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ukemunga
09-08-2011, 05:06 PM
Do you have any that you think just sound better with a low g?

I guess from what I've read in general, jazz and blues?

Specific songs?

Thanks,
Fred

mr moonlight
09-08-2011, 05:36 PM
I don't think it really makes any difference. You just have to arrange a song differently for high G vs. low G. Sometimes it is easier to arrange and play a song in one or the other. A number of solo classical/jazz uke players prefer to arrange using a low-G, but there are a lot of players who play classical and jazz songs with re-entrant so in the end it's more of just personal preference. I prefer low-G since I come from a classical guitar background and I'm just hardwired to think the lowest string will be the bass.

allanr
09-08-2011, 06:12 PM
I'm still working my through that question too, but I have formed a preliminary opinion based on my limited experience. Songs written for ukulele, especially the early classics from the 20s and 30s nearly always sound better on a reentrant uke. So do bluegrass songs when strummed. Songs written for guitar, rock, blues, etc seem to sound best when played with a low G uke.

TCK
09-08-2011, 09:07 PM
I agree with AllanR and will go one step further in saying that if you like Travis picking and old country or folk music, well it sounds great on a linear tuning, and garbage on a re-entrant. I will go a step further in saying that I think Bluegrass sounds a lot better on a linear set up than a re-entrant one, if you play the flat picking part. If you tend more toward the Mando sound, re-entrant is the way to go.

Hippie Guy
09-08-2011, 09:58 PM
Check out Herb Ohta Jr. if you're looking for a specific artist. He's the top dog when it comes to plain, beautiful low-g 'ukulele work. Something like his "Sand Castles" is a brilliant piece.

Jake Wildwood
09-08-2011, 10:17 PM
I agree with AllanR and will go one step further in saying that if you like Travis picking and old country or folk music, well it sounds great on a linear tuning, and garbage on a re-entrant. I will go a step further in saying that I think Bluegrass sounds a lot better on a linear set up than a re-entrant one, if you play the flat picking part. If you tend more toward the Mando sound, re-entrant is the way to go.

It's all in the interpretation and playing style... picking sounds just fine on a re-entrant, you just have to locate your bass on the 2nd string. As far as blending with folkie music... a faux or almost clawhammer or two-fingers approach gives a re-entrant uke a beautiful tone when mixing in on old-timey and folkie stuff, where that same uke would sound sort of dull and lackluster with a low-G. The sparkle of a re-entranted tuned uke in that sort of music is just plain pretty (and driving) in the same way a well-played 5-string is.

BWright
09-09-2011, 01:29 AM
I agree with TCK about the old country ("cowboy") songs. Since you asked for specific songs, "Streets of Laredo" is one I like in low-g.

Doc_J
09-09-2011, 01:48 AM
My low-g favorite songs: "Hallelujah" and "City of New Orleans"

ukemunga
09-10-2011, 05:21 PM
My low-g favorite songs: "Hallelujah" and "City of New Orleans"

I'm absolutely mesmerized by Rachel Pearl's version of Hallelujah. She is awesome! Check it out on youtube if you are not familiar with it.

Fred

ukemunga
09-10-2011, 05:26 PM
I'm still working my through that question too, but I have formed a preliminary opinion based on my limited experience. Songs written for ukulele, especially the early classics from the 20s and 30s nearly always sound better on a reentrant uke. So do bluegrass songs when strummed. Songs written for guitar, rock, blues, etc seem to sound best when played with a low G uke.

Makes perfect sense!

Doc_J
09-11-2011, 03:34 AM
I'm absolutely mesmerized by Rachel Pearl's version of Hallelujah. She is awesome! Check it out on youtube if you are not familiar with it.

Fred

Rachel Pearl's version (http://youtu.be/WHzQgP_s1Gw) was excellent. Thanks for the info.
My favorite Hallelujah version is still Jeff Buckley's (http://youtu.be/y8AWFf7EAc4).