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Thread: what are you reading?

  1. #391
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
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    Stone Harbor, NJ
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    842

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    Quote Originally Posted by janeray1940 View Post
    I really enjoyed that one and am thinking it might be time for a re-read. Did you know Sylvie Simmons is also a singer-songwriter who also plays ukulele?
    Sounds good, I will give it a try.
    DEPENDENTS:

    In order of age:

    Kamaka HF-4 Baritone C Linear Tuning 6/2009
    Martin C-1K Concert, Bb Re-entrant Tuning 4/2014
    KoAloha KTM-00 Tenor C Linear Tuning 7/2014
    Kala KA-SRMT-TRI Tenor C Linear Tuning 6/1/2015
    Pono MTD-CR Tenor C Re-entrant Tuning 6/21/2016
    Koaloha KCM-00 Concert Bb Linear Tuning 4/20/2017

  2. #392
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    Jan 2009
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    Quake Country
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    I'll have to get the Cohen book.

    I'm currently reading Neil Gaiman's "Trigger Warning". Beautiful book!
    I should be curling up with a good uke, a book and my dog.

  3. #393
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
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    Southern California
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    I'm so busy plowing through unread magazines and "how to play ..." books, that I don't have time to read a book!
    Last edited by Down Up Dick; 03-17-2017 at 05:04 AM.
    Kala "Spalted" baritone - Lo D GBD -
    Kala tenor eight string - gG cC EE AA

    Luna "Peace" concert - Hi-F BbDG
    Flea "Red" concert - Hi-G CEA -
    Kala "Exotic Mahogany" soprano - Hi-A DF#B

    Mahalo yellow "Smiley" soprano (Dad's Day gift) - C
    Ka-Lai Pineapple soprano (old) gift - C

    Down Up Down and still above ground.

    God gave us old age so we wouldn't mind dying so much.

  4. #394
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
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    Upper Hale, Surrey/Hants border, UK.
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    3,572

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    I've gone back to reading my copy of Love of Chromatic Harmonica, just 660 pages...........
    Keith M --> likes a long neck - & being different.....

  5. #395
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,131

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    imgres.jpg
    Eternal Troubadour: The Improbable Life Of Tiny Tim

    I just finished this book and I enjoyed it. Tiny Tim was certainly an interesting and curious character. What you saw of Tiny is what he was, it wasn't an act. I wasn't aware that he was so devoutly religious which lead, most notably, to his interesting views and approaches to sex, sexuality and marriage. He was horribly mismanaged and taken advantage of throughout his career and was his own worst enemy when it came to finances. He probably made millions in the course of his career but never saw much of it. I don't know that he really cared. I think all he really wanted was to perform. He was definitely one of the most famous ukulele players in the world. If you are curious about Tiny Tim, it's definitely worth the read.

    **This book was passed on to me from another forum member who asked that I do the same once I finished it. I will mail this book free of charge to anyone in the USA if they would like to read it and then pass it on when they are finished. PM me if you are interested. **
    Last edited by mikelz777; 04-15-2017 at 06:57 AM.
    Lanikai LU-21C concert - nato laminate (my starter uke!)
    Ohana CK-42R concert - solid sinker redwood top, solid rosewood back and sides, maple binding
    Kala KA-FMCG concert- solid spruce top, laminate spalted flame maple back and sides, mahogany binding

    Money can't buy happiness but it can buy a ukulele which is basically the same thing.

  6. #396
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    2,286

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    I'm finally nearing the end of the 21 books of the The Cadfael Chronicles by Ellis Peters!

    Non-fiction books I'm currently reading are Gunnar Dickfeld's "Leben und Tod" (a German book on the fundamentals of life and death in the game of Go) and Josh Waitzkin's "The Art of Learning".

    Ukulele-wise, I bought the three volumes by Ukulelezazza which he shipped today, so these will be my songbooks for a while, at least for re-entrant! I really want to start to properly study the "Everything" book on music theory.
    Current main players: Moon Bird concert and Barron River tenor. My other ukes are listed on my profile page.

  7. #397
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    5,413

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikelz777 View Post
    imgres.jpg
    Eternal Troubadour: The Improbable Life Of Tiny Tim

    I just finished this book and I enjoyed it. Tiny Tim was certainly an interesting and curious character. What you saw of Tiny is what he was, it wasn't an act. I wasn't aware that he was so devoutly religious which lead, most notably, to his interesting views and approaches to sex, sexuality and marriage. He was horribly mismanaged and taken advantage of throughout his career and was his own worst enemy when it came to finances. He probably made millions in the course of his career but never saw much of it. I don't know that he really cared. I think all he really wanted was to perform. He was definitely one of the most famous ukulele players in the world. If you are curious about Tiny Tim, it's definitely worth the read.

    **This book was passed on to me from another forum member who asked that I do the same once I finished it. I will mail this book free of charge to anyone in the USA if they would like to read it and then pass it on when they are finished. PM me if you are interested. **
    PM sent. This sounds really enjoyable. I recall a brief mention of Tiny Tim in Suze Rotolo's memoir about Greenwich Village, and have always been curious to know more.

  8. #398
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    2,839

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mivo View Post
    I'm finally nearing the end of the 21 books of the The Cadfael Chronicles by Ellis Peters!

    Non-fiction books I'm currently reading are Gunnar Dickfeld's "Leben und Tod" (a German book on the fundamentals of life and death in the game of Go) and Josh Waitzkin's "The Art of Learning".

    Ukulele-wise, I bought the three volumes by Ukulelezazza which he shipped today, so these will be my songbooks for a while, at least for re-entrant! I really want to start to properly study the "Everything" book on music theory.
    I read and enjoyed some of the Cadfael books, and my wife and I watched all of them on TV. Some of them twice. My wife likes mysteries, and I like history.

    Derek Jacobi is terrific in whatever he plays. "I Claudius" was another good series.
    Kala "Spalted" baritone - Lo D GBD -
    Kala tenor eight string - gG cC EE AA

    Luna "Peace" concert - Hi-F BbDG
    Flea "Red" concert - Hi-G CEA -
    Kala "Exotic Mahogany" soprano - Hi-A DF#B

    Mahalo yellow "Smiley" soprano (Dad's Day gift) - C
    Ka-Lai Pineapple soprano (old) gift - C

    Down Up Down and still above ground.

    God gave us old age so we wouldn't mind dying so much.

  9. #399
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Quake Country
    Posts
    1,917

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    "Lincoln in the Bardo" by George Saunders.

    I bought the book expecting it to be about, well Abraham Lincoln in the bardo, and it is not. It is about his son Willie in the bardo. Lincoln spends time in grief and contemplation while visiting his son's body in the crypt in which he was laid. He is profoundly affected and his state of mind is depicted, and acted upon, by those nearby souls who are actually still stuck in the bardo. Those souls are enraptured by the "sight" of Lincoln grieving for his son, of his deep love and suffering over the loss of his boy, and of the boy in soul form trying to connect with his father as he had in life. The majority of the book depicts those characters, so I feel the title is a little misleading.

    Lincoln has to find the psychological strength to continue his leadership of the divided country in the face of the tragedy that is the Civil War while floored by such a tremendous personal loss. Losing his son increases his empathy with all the others who have lost their sons to the war, and solidifies his need to bring an end to it in the quickest way possible. The book provides an account of how he managed to continue on in the face of so much personal grief without falling into the refuge of, and thus becoming lost to, a deep depression.

    It's an unusual format, not a narration so much as conversation followed by observation. There is a lyrical beauty to the writing. Through the majority of characters the reader vicariously comes to terms with the transience of life and the inevitability of death.

    I am now reading Neal Gaiman's "M is for Magic".
    I should be curling up with a good uke, a book and my dog.

  10. #400
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    Nov 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teek View Post
    "Lincoln in the Bardo" by George Saunders.
    Your couple of paragraphs actually made me want to read this more than any other writeup of it I've seen. Might have to put it on the library list!

    On the bardo topic, I'm reading Robert Thurman's Tibetan Book of the Dead right now (and wishing all the while I had bought it hardcopy rather than on my iPad, since I've concluded I really hate reading e-books).

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