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Thread: what are you reading?

  1. #21
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    GinnyT11, I couldn't agree more. My wife and I have a B&N Nook, but I never use it. I too like the feel of a book in my hands, and I like to make notes in it and go back to check something on earlier pages. Nothing like a good book, a nice, comfortable chair and a glass of Irish whiskey.
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  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Down Up Dick View Post
    Nothing like a good book, a nice, comfortable chair and a glass of Irish whiskey.
    Irish whiskey...? We're studying single-malt Scotch whisky (see how the spelling varies by country?), usually while watching Netflix movies, but maybe sipping while reading is an equally good combination. Does the sun have to be low?

    .
    Last edited by GinnyT11; 08-31-2014 at 04:13 PM.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Down Up Dick View Post
    I like to make notes in it and go back to check something on earlier pages.
    I do this too! To the point where I'm sometimes a bit embarrassed to lend books to others because they'll find out too much about me

  4. #24
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    Just finished The Sun Also Rises; finally! Made it three-quarters way through some seven years ago, but for reasons that escape me, I stopped. Interestingly, I tried to get my oldest son to read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn- which I've read, probably my favorite book ever- but he's only starting fifth grade this year (like, in two days) and I think it's over his head as yet; but, here's a quote from Hemingway about Huck Finn which ultimately made me dust off my old copy of a The Sun Also Rises, only recently:

    http://classiclit.about.com/od/adven...inn_writer.htm

    I'm only halfway through the reread of Huck Finn, but nevertheless I suppose Hemingway made a valid point about the ending, although I think, so far, halfway through again, it might not matter- considering how powerful the beginning and bulk of the story are. I'm rambling now and there's a fat chance this post is riddled with typos; alas, so it goes, so it goes... -- Matt

  5. #25
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    Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven which was good, but painfully real and sad, but very well written.
    Glad to see some Murakami reviews; might have to check the newest out.
    Excitedly waiting for the new David Mitchell novel this week
    "If a lot of people play the ukulele, the world would be a better place to live."

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by wickedwahine11 View Post
    I have a side job working for a publishing company, so often times I am reading those books, but when I can read whatever I want, it is usually escapist thrillers -- James Patterson, Gone Girl, that kind of mind candy. Right now I am reading the second book in the Game of Thrones series, Clash of Kings. I'm trying very carefully not to get ahead of the tv show and heard it is safe to read through the fourth book since it is about a book a season. Did Storm of Swords basically match up to the third season of the show?
    I only caught the tail end of the third season because I really don't watch much TV at all (it just became "what we did" after playing D&D on Sundays)...but so far, it's exactly like the third season. I started the first book way back when it first came out...and it's taken me all this time to get through to the end of the third.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fred Ukestone View Post
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  7. #27
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    Soupking, you mention rereading Huck Finn. How many of you reread books? There are SO MANY that it seems you're losing opportunities to read new recommendations when you go back.

    Some books don't hold up...I found Catcher in the Rye to be really boring when I reread it a couple years ago.

    However, if many years pass between readings, you get an interesting view of yourself and how you've changed. When I read Diary of a Young Girl as a teen, I identified with Anne Frank. When I read it in my 30s, I identified more with her mother and the could see her difficulty in dealing with a teen daughter who didn't like her.

  8. #28
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    I kust finished our own steveperrywriter's Dog Paddling the Third Wave and enjoyed ithoroughly.

    Mahalo, Steve!

    (Now, off to his Matadora series again . . . )

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  9. #29
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    GinnyT11, I read Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath" and Michener's "The Source" and Scott 's "Ivanhoe", so many times I had to get rid of them. I cut my library way down because I wasn't reading anything new. A really good book is a treasure. I've just gotten back to reading lately. I guess I had book burnout.
    Kala "Spalted" baritone - Lo D GBD
    Kala tenor eight string - gG cC EE AA

    Luna "Peace" concert - Lo - G CEA
    Flea "Red" concert - Hi-G CEA -
    Kala "Exotic Mahogany" soprano - Hi-A DF#B

    Mahalo yellow "Smiley" soprano (Dad's Day gift) - C
    Ka-Lai Pineapple soprano (old) gift - C

    Asthma is not conducive to singing or even whistling.

    God gave us old age so we wouldn't mind dying so much.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by GinnyT11 View Post
    Soupking, you mention rereading Huck Finn. How many of you reread books? There are SO MANY that it seems you're losing opportunities to read new recommendations when you go back.

    Some books don't hold up...I found Catcher in the Rye to be really boring when I reread it a couple years ago.

    However, if many years pass between readings, you get an interesting view of yourself and how you've changed. When I read Diary of a Young Girl as a teen, I identified with Anne Frank. When I read it in my 30s, I identified more with her mother and the could see her difficulty in dealing with a teen daughter who didn't like her.
    I've done my fair share of re-reading over the years - I usually pick a writer or subject and make it my "summer reading" project. Last year it was re-reading Kerouac for the first time since my teens; this year it's been Joan Didion. I do this in part for the reason you mentioned - it's an exercise in learning about myself! And sometimes it really makes me wonder about the person I was at 16 or whatever who just loved this book or that - mostly I find myself wondering how the heck I understood it at that age.

    And I've kept a copy of "The Grapes of Wrath" on hand my entire adult life to re-read when I'm in tough economic times. Really gives one perspective!

    As for "Catcher in the Rye" - I've NEVER been able to make it through that book. Didn't relate to it as a teen, can't relate to it as an adult. Makes me wonder if I'm just not the target audience - wrong gender, wrong economic class, wrong coast to have been born and raised on - or if there's just something my head is too thick to "get." Same goes for much of Fitzgerald's fiction, for that matter.

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