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Thread: smart chord app

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Sunny Wales
    Posts
    2

    Default smart chord app

    Smart chord is an free app I use that has quite frankly revolutionised my playing. It covers pretty much any instrument with a fret board and strings. I use a custom setting on the 4 string banjo for my tenor guitar, the uke setting of course and I reset the cigarbox to tune my baritone.

    It gives a tuner for whatever instrument you choose.

    It then depending on setting gives a chord dictionary which is optionally massive. Alternatively fingering, wierd tuning not problem. Lost a finger somwhere, there is setting it.

    It even does some scales although it is eurocentric ones , they are fun to noodle about with and do free form jamming with.

    I have no connection with the company. The app is free, it is not full of ads, its doesn't fill your cache memory with junk and doesn't ask for permission for silly stuff.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Florida Space Coast
    Posts
    11,820

    Default

    Looks cool. I found the web page, but I can't change the instrument from guitar to uke. I notice a "download" link in the menu. Any tips?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Cleveland, OH
    Posts
    622

    Default

    Just tried it out. It has way more features than I bargained for on a free app. Very nice addition. Thanks!
    Lanikai SMP-TCA Monkeypod Tenor * RISA Uke-Solid Tenor * Kala KA-TG tenor * Ken Timms Style 0 Soprano * Ohana SK-38 Soprano * Mainland Honeybee Soprano * 1930's KlearTone banjolele
    1920's Favilla soprano * 1920's Criterion birch soprano * Makala Dolphin

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Belgium
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    181

    Default

    Unfortunately, only on Android...
    UkeFever... ukulele tabs for free!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    wLa, CA
    Posts
    111

    Default

    x2 for smartChord.
    circle of fifths wheel, transposer, metronome....pretty packed for a free app, and dev is responsive, so hooked up a doni.
    Before you speak, before you act;
    imagine your mom, kid, and childhood idol are standing before you.
    Would you do/say the same thing?


    Capitalization: the difference bewtween you helping your uncle Jack off a horse, and you helping your uncle jack off a horse.


    You don't know what you don't know till you know you don't know it; the more you know, the more you realize how much you really don't.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    West Los Angeles, California
    Posts
    131

    Default

    Anyone seen a video on how to use the arpeggio function? Or can anyone here make a video explaining it?

    I see it. I can read it. I can change the key. I just don't understand what it is for and how to use it!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Walla Walla, WA
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    378

    Default

    I use that app, too. For a small fee, you can unlock more functions, most of which I don't use, but could, such as a place to file and organize your music (I use ForScore on the iPad for that). One thing I do use, just to amaze myself, is the magic "what's this chord" function. This app is amazing.
    Kiwaya KTS-6
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    Mahilele 3.0 Skull

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    264

    Default

    I use a hard copy app called "Ukulele Chord Dictionary" from Alfred by Morton Manus. I have had it since about 2006. As well as the chords, it shows a lot of moveable chords shapes, some basic music theory, a fingerboard chart, some alternate chords and so on, all in a book which fits in a soprano case. It does not need an ISP or batteries or software updates and the chord shapes and fretboard wont change in the next 50 years. I think you can still get it on Amazon for $3.47. ISBN 0-88284-208-0.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    on the path
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    5,329

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill1 View Post
    I use a hard copy app called "Ukulele Chord Dictionary" from Alfred by Morton Manus. I have had it since about 2006. As well as the chords, it shows a lot of moveable chords shapes, some basic music theory, a fingerboard chart, some alternate chords and so on, all in a book which fits in a soprano case. It does not need an ISP or batteries or software updates and the chord shapes and fretboard wont change in the next 50 years. I think you can still get it on Amazon for $3.47. ISBN 0-88284-208-0.
    LOL Bill you are too funny!

    While I agree somewhat with the implied perception of the absurdity of 'the gold rush' to make everything an app - there is some merit to having a pocket device that can hold a greater density of information and at much lower carrying weight than a stack of books...

    Kindle holds at least 2,000 books and weighs less than a pound, and most smartphones can ALSO do that and tonnes more, with power about equal to a desktop or laptop computer from about 7-8 yrs ago, in your hand or pocket with a battery that can last all day...

    In the end, when the internet apocalypse comes, and access to information goes back to how it was in the 1970's, those who have the dead-tree versions of an information repository might be considered as 'wealthy'.

    Who knows, the Public Library may experience a surge in popularity ?

    I gave away lots of books, but some I will keep forever.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    264

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    Computer apps are wonderful while you are in line of sight to a base station antenna. They can cost you the price of a ukulele (in Australia) every year if you pay an ISP and buy apps which you really don't need. I keep reading posts about how much ukuleles cost, posted by people who have a $80 per month ISP bill and who seem to have no worries buying apps and paying twice, once to the ISP for the data and then a fee to the company that makes the app. 12 x $80 = $960 per year.
    However, the reality is that UU has many members from the world of computers, their fun comes from doing stuff on computers, so I don't see why they wouldn't try to write and find apps to download use, that is what they like to do. On the other hand, If you are a beginner who is not a computer person, in some cases you are going to learn a lot more by buying a useful hard copy chord chart book. Little things in the computer programs like enharmonic chord names can be very confusing to beginners. Look at the recent post with the Ab and G# chord for example.
    It is an apt day to be talking about the apocalypse, 23 September 2017.

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