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Thread: Please convince me against picking up classical guitar at this stage

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
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    If you can play the ukulele you are actually technically two thirds of the way to playing the guitar. A ukulele is tuned the same as a guitar in that it is in 4 ths and it starts at the equivalent of the 6th fret on guitar. The fifth fret being GCEA on the guit box.....the chord shapes are the same except on the git box you add the two bass strings as well. So a full chord would like the ukulele chord + 2 . There is no huge mystery once you can get your head round the two bass strings and that you are starting lower down the scale....in fact just thing of it as a low tuned uke with extra bassy strings. In actual fact ...SMH ...DGBE the open strings higher up are exactly the same as baritone ukulele tuning......and you have the EA bass strings too.....If you go classical or Spanish with nylon strings then that at least reduces the pain of developing steel string callouses.Which you probably will on the round wounds anyway...


    A C chord on the uke is this 0003 or the full fat version is 5433......the same shape on the guitar at the third fret is G except it would be 320003..and you can play it as XX5433 or 335433..same shapes...


    Just to square the circle.If you try a guilele you will find that C is ...320003...and etc.


    Thing is it's up to you, your itch. Do you scratch or leave it alone......?
    Last edited by CeeJay; 08-18-2016 at 02:59 PM.

  2. #22
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    I wonder what she ended up doing, and where she went with it?
    I don't want to live in a world that is linear.

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/1978485476...rds=R.+L.+Link

  3. #23
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    May 2010
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    UK
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    Don't know but I'm not sure what the difficulty is with playing both, many people do. You don't have to read standard notation to play the classical guitar. I don't even though I can read music.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
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    Lower Slower Delaware
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    No good. I just took the plunge at age 64 (months from 65.) Someone wanted me to review a new Cordoba guitar for beginners and I agreed and took the plunge.

    The old Zen proverb: When the student is ready, the teacher appears" seems to hold true for me. I struck out finding teachers and suddenly ran across a guy in our largest city, about 35 minutes from my house. Unfortunately he only teaches at night, but he's so AMAZING a teacher, it's worth it. He's also a luthier and runs the local classical guitar society.

    I'm REALLY enjoying it. It's vastly different than the ukulele except that I always loved fingerstyle. He's a bug for good hand position and how to move on the fretboard with maximum efficiency. The uke doesn't require such rigor because you aren't stretching over 2 inches of board.

    The Cordoba Protege is fairly nice, has a truss rod which even my old Yamaha didn't have and it's not going to break the bank. One probably should restring it. It comes with Savarez, but I prefer D'Addarios.

    I can't dissuade you. Because I'm enjoying it myself. Just find a good teacher. I was blessed. My guy is amazing.
    Ukes: Mainland mahogany tenor, Eleuke Tenor Solid Cutaway Sunburst
    Guitars: Yamaha GS-90, Marcario flamenco negra, Cordoba Protege 3/4

  5. #25
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    Dec 2011
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    Lower Slower Delaware
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    I forgot to add something important.

    You need to read music to truly play classical guitar. Frankly, reading music is good for any instrument, but really good teacher will want you to read music, not tabs.

    I'm very lucky in that I've read music since I was 8 years old and I'm fluent in sightreading both clefs. (Piano player.) It's a skill that I'm sorry to say is being dropped by our government schools. Like languages, it's best learned young, but it can be learned. If you do not read music, find a tutorial that will get you at ease with it. This opens a world of riches to you.
    Ukes: Mainland mahogany tenor, Eleuke Tenor Solid Cutaway Sunburst
    Guitars: Yamaha GS-90, Marcario flamenco negra, Cordoba Protege 3/4

  6. #26

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    I played guitar for years before playing ukulele. The conversion from guitar to ukulele was easy, but I think going from ukulele to guitar is a lot harder.

    As far as instrumental solos and fingerpicking, I do both on guitar and ukulele. I have reached a much higher level of proficiency on ukulele than I ever did on guitar. Classical guitar requires more discipline and time than I was ever willing to give to it.

  7. #27
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    Sep 2012
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    Time is certainly the problem. I have a cordoba mini that calls out to me sometimes but I know it's going to need serious time. I also have piano, voice and strings background and I was very proficient sight reading 5 or so different clefs in college. Attaching notes to guitar frets and strings is the effort part (esp since I'm used to seeing notes at ukulele pitch), and of course my whimsical nature regarding instruments I want to learn.
    In order of play time: Martin OXK, Lanikai LU21B, Islander MT4, Rubin Sopranino

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
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    Picking up classical guitar was the best things I've done for my playing. I started last year and finished this book https://www.amazon.com/Classical-Gui.../dp/0634093290 , which is an excellent book to get you up and running on classical guitar. I supplemented the book with classical guitar courses on www.udemy.com .


    Classical guitar developed finger independence on both hands, taught me to sight read, and gave me the technical skill to play other types of music using finger style.

    I took up Jazz guitar and the classical guitar techniques helped with making chords and finger style Jazz.

    I've noticed that I can play blues guitar, rock guitar, or finger style guitar much easier. These would be much more difficult without learning classical guitar.

    Not to mention that ukulele is much easier now.

    Classical guitar can be a fun instrument and not at all stuffy. I have fun with and it's just one of the guitar styles that I'm learning.

  9. #29
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    Absolutely agree with you that guitar-uke is easy, uke-guitar is NOT. But guitar is a totally different animal. I love the sound of those bass strings. You really do accompany yourself, the way you do with piano. I do love the uke, but guitar is well worth learning and it's added so much to my life. But challenging? Oh my. I think it's almost as bad as a violin. No one tells you this. But there is so much to learn in subtle, tiny things. Hand position across the strings, your FINGERNAILS (my teacher files my nails if they aren't angled correctly), the left hand--how to move around the fretboard. Fingering both hands, important. And how to fool the ear--holding one note to keep a sustain going, even if it's a different note to give the ear something to listen to as you move to new notes on the fretboard (as my instructor says, "Smoke and mirrors.")

    The uke is great but the addition of those deep notes brings such a dimension to music.
    Ukes: Mainland mahogany tenor, Eleuke Tenor Solid Cutaway Sunburst
    Guitars: Yamaha GS-90, Marcario flamenco negra, Cordoba Protege 3/4

  10. #30
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    Nov 2016
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    Orange county.
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    Classical guitar has a steep learning curve in the beginning because of demands for precision in fingering unlike any other guitar style or uke discipline. Also you really need to learn to read standard notation.
    It takes a while but if youre persistent, the reading ability comes eventually (like typing /instant reaction) but it comes w persistence and patience.
    All for sale; pm me:


    Brand new Loprinzi Honduran mahogany soprano w new hardshell case. $350 -> 325

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