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Thread: Short scale guitar options?

  1. #11
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    I've been studying up on resonators, and discovered Republic makes a short scale metal parlor that is around 22". Check out the website for the specific model #, but they are worth a look on YT.
    I should be curling up with a good uke, a book and my dog.

  2. #12
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    I like my Taylor gs mini, 23.5 scale. Got it used, mint cond $325. I don't find steel strings to be a big deal. My fingers are pretty callused from heavy uke playing. These guitars are well regarded on AGF for their big sound, small size and bargains can be found.

  3. #13
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    The Ibanez piccolo guitar, I own one and really like it!
    Sopranos: Martin 0XK, Gretsch G9100
    Concerts: Ibanez UEWT5E
    Tenors: Kala KA-SRT-CTG-E (Kala Solid Cedar top Rosewood), Cordoba tenor 20TM-CE
    Basses: too many!

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by timmit65 View Post
    The Ibanez piccolo guitar, I own one and really like it!
    Do you have any difficulties with fretting? A 42mm nut seems really narrow to me, for six strings. I don't have thick fingers, but even 44.5mm nuts require a level of precision I had to really get used to first. I think 46mm would me perfect to me (I know that 51mm is too wide for me). But, yes, a 17" steel string "guitarlele" is attractive to me too!

  5. #15
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    No. For me it's easier than either the Yamaha GL1 or Cordoba Guilele CE. I know the Ibanez is somewhat hard to find, but I'd recommend, at least, trying it before you buy.
    Sopranos: Martin 0XK, Gretsch G9100
    Concerts: Ibanez UEWT5E
    Tenors: Kala KA-SRT-CTG-E (Kala Solid Cedar top Rosewood), Cordoba tenor 20TM-CE
    Basses: too many!

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by timmit65 View Post
    The Ibanez piccolo guitar, I own one and really like it!
    How is the intonation on yours? How did you get it to intonate right? As suspected, my Ibanez Piccolo goes terribly sharp up the neck. Also, the nut is awefully narrow for me.

  7. #17
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    How is the intonation on yours? How did you get it to intonate right? As suspected, my Ibanez Piccolo goes terribly sharp up the neck. Also, the nut is awefully narrow for me.
    Note: I set up all of my stringed instruments. So, the action is lots lower than the factory set up....

    That said, it's good enough to not drive me crazy! I never think about it. I play lots of open chords some up the neck and it's fine. As with all instruments, it's subjective, but I really like it.

    It did come with, and I do use, a compensated saddle.
    Sopranos: Martin 0XK, Gretsch G9100
    Concerts: Ibanez UEWT5E
    Tenors: Kala KA-SRT-CTG-E (Kala Solid Cedar top Rosewood), Cordoba tenor 20TM-CE
    Basses: too many!

  8. #18
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    Feb 2017
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    Hi There!

    You can also go for Cordoba Mini M or O Guitars. I am using cordoba mini M guitar and enjoying my travel while playing the same. Hope this will help!

    Thanks!

  9. #19
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    Aug 2014
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    Also do you prefer nylon string or steel string? And what nut width, as some are wide like a classical guitar and others more closer to folk size width.

    Also, do you prefer shorter scale for easier fretting purposes, or just a smaller overall size guitar for travel purposes?

    The Pono someone mentioned is 21.4" scale and steel string, so just slightly larger than a baritone. You might also try the Kinnard Kiku. The Kinnard kiku is 20" scale, and nylon string. And Lichty makes a baby bard guitar and also I think a kiku that are shorter scales.

  10. #20
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    The problem with most 'guitar companies' that are making baritone scale guitars is that when they shorten the scale length down from 25.5", to 23" or less, they also make the nut narrower, some as narrow as 42mm or 1.65" and if you are used to playing a uke with only 4 strings on a 35mm or 38mm (1.375-1.5") nut, this is going to feel REALLY cramped unless your fingers are as agile as crab legs, with equally thin fingertips.

    It seems someone has brainwashed all these guitar makers that SHORTER scale = 7 yr old CHILD guitar and TINY fingers, and thus NONE of them are comfortable if you are used to a wider nut. or wider string spacing.

    I have the Cordoba Mini SM-CE, and it has a 51mm nut width (2") which is standard for classical guitar and it is VERY comfortable coming from ukulele. I played classical guitar before ukulele and the string-to-string spacing either way is very close, but nearly ANY steel string electric or acoustic guitar is very difficult for me to fret cleanly, and I seldom have a desire for steel strings these days.

    If you want a baritone scale and NOT pay big bucks for a 'kiku' from Kanile'a (Islander), Collings, Pono or Ko'olau, really the ONLY option in the budget side of things is the Cordoba Mini, which start at about $199 new.

    Even a Requinto, or a 1/2-size guitar is going to have a nut width of only 45mm, which for 6 strings is really cramped for me.
    Just the FAQs
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