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Thread: campanella

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevepetergal View Post
    You've been given good answers to your original question, but this is a bit misleading. The re-entrant tuning gives the ukulele player one additional tool for playing campanella style. Campanella can be played just as well with a linear tuning. Some of us play this style with both types of tuning. Remember, campanella is a guitar technique adopted by us ukulele players.
    Thank you for that insight. I admit I was unaware of this technique being used on guitar ... I'll bear it in mind
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  2. #12
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    It is not true that campanella technique is a guitar technique adopted by the ukulele.

    Campanella technique was used long before the classical guitar existed. In fact it was used on instruments that were very similar to the ukulele. Some of them were even tuned in GCEA tuning just like the "modern ukulele". There are even roughly 500 years old tabs for those instruments which can be directly played with the ukulele.

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    Wilfried
    Visit my ukulele web site: http://www.ukulele-arts.com/ for tabs, e-books and other uke related stuff!

  3. #13
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    Don't use campanella for the sake of campanella. It doesn't work musically for every type of music piece. That's where John king got it wrong sorry.
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  4. #14
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    Since initiating this thread, that has been my conclusion as well. Currently I consider it an adornment such as legato, pizzicato, or trills. It works where it works. It is kind of like cinnamon: a little bit enhances the flavor, but too much makes it bitter and unpalatable. On a practical level, the one place that campanella seems to contribute to my style is in playing scales and modes. Since scales/modes span across all strings (or,at least, 3 strings in re-entrant tunings) it is a nice effect to use the cross-resonances of the appealing pealing bell sound of campanella by going back and forth between strings. It really breaks up the scale and makes it sound more musical and less linear.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Debussychopin View Post
    Don't use campanella for the sake of campanella. It doesn't work musically for every type of music piece. That's where John king got it wrong sorry.
    Would you be so kind as to elaborate on King's mis-application of campanella?

    I'm not trying to be difficult, but if such an issue exists, I'd like to become aware of it so as to avoid contributing to the problem myself.

    A video or sound sample would help to clarify, if possible to add one to a written description.

    Thanks in advance.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill1 View Post
    ...Campanella is but one path to this goal there are plenty of others. If you don't like King's arrangements, maybe you will be able to publish some books and videos of your own arrangements which get the same recognition as we see recorded in this obituary?
    Thanks for that info and link Bill.

    I am not experienced enough yet with campanella to have a qualified opinion as to what he did wrong, or did right, and merely just beginning to study his technique and arrangements via:



    https://www.fleamarketmusic.com/stor...?idproduct=170

    Which I am happy to use as a starting point, even if other folks consider him to be less than an optimal example of this style of playing.

    I am ignorant of why one would avoid his techniques, and that was why I had asked the above question in my other post.

    While it has not happened yet, I would caution other folks to not speak ill of the deceased, even if only out of respect for their contributions which might be esteemed by other folks. We all have our likes and dislikes and opinions can be expressed without putting down anyone or anything. Kindness is all that is required.

  7. #17
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    I just wanted to clarify my ambiguous post above. I wasn't agreeing that King had got it wrong. I was agreeing that campanella, like everything else, has a time and place. I have King's book, as well as Tony Mizen's, on campanella. As beautiful as those arrangements are, I had to admit that they don't apply to what I'm trying to do. That's all.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill1 View Post
    [...] However, it wont work as well on the longer scale ukes like tenors and baritones because you have to move your hands too much. But of course that really does not matter because every serious ukulele player wants to master the soprano size, no matter what size they start on, it is like the important endgame of ukulele playing.
    My experience is exactly opposite. I much prefer playing campanella on tenors and baritones because I have fewer problems with shifts than with scrunched fingerings. I can play much more cleanly on tenors and baris, especially in the upper neck and over the body. In fact, one reason I put a bari in reentrant G tuning was to allow me to play campanella even more comfortably and cleanly than on my tenors. The occasional stretches I can manage; scrunched positions are more common and more challenging. One's hand size doesn't shrink as one moves up the neck to narrower fret spacings, and there's a minimum space required to move one's fingers around freely. You pass that threshold lower on the fretboard on sopranos and concerts.

    Sopranos also tend to have fewer frets, and consequently a more limited range, with a body joint more typically at the 12th fret, and they seldom have cutaways for accessing the higher frets. So having tried campanella on concerts, tenors and baris (no need to even touch a soprano), my top choices are a cutaway bari or tenor with a 1.5" nut (and string spacing to match), the antithesis of what you envision as the ideal.

    Your second statement is pure BS: the many deficiencies of sopranos in comparison to concerts and tenors have been pointed out repeatedly. This myth that soprano is the ideal size—simply because it was the first—needs to die, and it's hardly true that all (or even most) serious players aspire to play sopranos—tenor is a more popular size among the pros, and rock music has taken over the general uke repertoire, which has changed the kind of tone serious musicians prefer.

  9. #19
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    There are merits to all of your guys points above, but why does everything have to be absolutely either/or or all-or-nothing?

    By default, I reject dogma and doctrine, and once I understand John King's style I will pick and choose how to use it FOR MYSELF and not according to the rules of some magisterium.

    I have no intentions of joining an orchestra or symphony where they impose a hard discipline upon the musicians in the ensemble.

    My music is for me, and I really dont care about 'the rules' as long as it makes a pleasing sound, and by golly that usually follows along with the study and application of Music Theory...unless one's intention is to create dissonant music, and do something completely different...

    Nobody has to be 'wrong' here for all of us to find joy in the application of various techniques.

    If mis-information is being distributed, we can have a civilized discussion, which I would prefer, and elevate the level of knowledge without anyone feeling slighted.

    Thanks for reading, I will now step down from the soap-box.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Booli View Post
    Would you be so kind as to elaborate on King's mis-application of campanella?

    I'm not trying to be difficult, but if such an issue exists, I'd like to become aware of it so as to avoid contributing to the problem myself.

    A video or sound sample would help to clarify, if possible to add one to a written description.

    Thanks in advance.
    I rather explain verbally than try to type out my thoughts and what I know about music theory (both piano and guitar, and I'm sure for most western music and instruments) p m me
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