Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Mandolin voicing on ukulele?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    13

    Default Mandolin voicing on ukulele?

    Hi all. I was at a ukulele workshop over the weekend, and one of the things demoed was mandolin voicing. This article covers it, for example: https://liveukulele.com/chords/mando...e-open-chords/


    Three chords we were shown were:
    0087 -- C
    0058 -- Fadd9
    0037 -- C

    I love the sound of the 0087 and 0058 C and Fadd9, and I'm wondering where I can find more chords with the open first two strings. Is there a G floating around somewhere there, for example?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Leeds UK
    Posts
    184

    Default

    Just off the top of my head.

    0088 Csus4
    0068 C7sus4
    0035 Gsus4
    0077 CMaj7

    There must plenty more.

    If you want a G then 0275 would be a similar voicing but probably a bit of a stretch.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    13

    Default

    Thank you for the information, Dibblet and ukulele! I look forward to playing around with those.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Near Lake Okeechobee, Florida
    Posts
    205

    Default

    For a full 2-octave G, try: 0-2-7-10. Not the easiest fingering, but oh-so-satisfying!

    Some other G chords:

    0578 (G7)
    0-11-10-10 (G)
    Last edited by bacchettadavid; 06-19-2017 at 08:11 PM.
    "Who hears music, feels his solitude Peopled at once -- for how count heart-beats plain / Unless a company, with hearts which beat, / Come close to the musician, seen or no?" - Robert Browning, "Balaustion's Adventure"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Near Lake Okeechobee, Florida
    Posts
    205

    Default

    I spent a couple hours early this morning working on these open voicings, and I've come to a few realizations:

    1. One reliable means of creating these chords is to fret each string as if playing the same chord in different positions on the neck simultaneously (this is how I came upon 0-2-7-10).
    2. So long as you are careful about which scalar degree you're gaining and which degree you're sacrificing, another reliable way to open up the voicing is to fret the A string 3 frets higher than the C string (to create the octave interval). For example, 0215 would be G7 but lacks the third scalar degree, so it becomes a G7sus/D. Chord substitution techniques usually offer workarounds in most keys.
    3. Working around the ukuleles limitations and discovering these chords is a great way to deepen your knowledge of the ukulele fretboard and harmonic progressions as they apply to the uke.

    And 4. Low G would make this *so* much easier!
    "Who hears music, feels his solitude Peopled at once -- for how count heart-beats plain / Unless a company, with hearts which beat, / Come close to the musician, seen or no?" - Robert Browning, "Balaustion's Adventure"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    13

    Default

    Thank you very much for taking the time to work on these, and then sharing your information with us! I'm a relative newcomer to the instrument, and I am very interested in learning to progress beyond the first three frets. Your info is quite helpful!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    302

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jisa View Post
    I'm a relative newcomer to the instrument, and I am very interested in learning to progress beyond the first three frets.
    In that case, I suggest you take a root-centric view of your chord shapes and then learn (roughly in order of utility):
    • The same-note-name pattern (I call it the "zigzag").
    • Chord shape derivations, using the four main movable 7th shapes as templates. Who needs steenking chord charts when figuring out chord shapes directly on the fretboard, in any region, is so easy?
    • The fourths/fifths pattern, essentially, the "circle of fifths" mapped directly to the fretboard.
    • Relative root clusters or the closely related CAGFD system.
    • Cross-fretboard intervals.


    Although these things may sound complex, they actually simplify a lot of things because they unify all the piecemeal rote knowledge (and avoid the necessity of having to learn masses of other stuff by rote while keeping it all straight)I love generalized, easy-to-visualize patterns for their clarity and work reduction. The relative view underlying these patterns also better accords with how we really make sense of music subconsciously, so it's a huge aid in ear training and replicating things in any key, any fretboard position, any fleas tuning you choose. I wish I'd been taught these patterns at the very beginning, when I was just embarking on chord shapes and the main chords in the most common keys.

    A good resource for playing up the neck is Ukulele Fretboard Roadmaps by Fred Sokolow and Jim Beloff. I've heard there's an even better guide now, but I've never read it and I don't recall its name or author, sorry.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Near Lake Okeechobee, Florida
    Posts
    205

    Default

    I second Ubulele's advice. I'm remediating my own grasp of those fundamentals, and looking back, I wish I'd put in the work to learn the basics back when I started.
    "Who hears music, feels his solitude Peopled at once -- for how count heart-beats plain / Unless a company, with hearts which beat, / Come close to the musician, seen or no?" - Robert Browning, "Balaustion's Adventure"

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    13

    Default

    Thank you for the suggestion-I am getting that book from my local library!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    189

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ubulele View Post

    A good resource for playing up the neck is Ukulele Fretboard Roadmaps by Fred Sokolow and Jim Beloff. I've heard there's an even better guide now, but I've never read it and I don't recall its name or author, sorry.
    Perhaps you are thinking of Bordessa's Ukulele Chord Shapes?

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •