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Thread: Mandolin voicing on ukulele?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ripock View Post
    Perhaps you are thinking of Bordessa's Ukulele Chord Shapes?
    No, the book I'm thinking of is more general than that, and the title is more indicative of complete fretboard mastery, though I was unable to locate it with various Amazon searches; it's been mentioned here several times in other threads on moving up the fretboard. I've just looked at a preview of Brad's book, and it mostly takes a "compendium" rather than a derivation approach, so as much as I respect Brad and think he's one sharp guy, I can't recommend his book. But I've already thrown this thread too much off-topic, so I won't go deeper into that here.

    I will point out that if you just want a reference compendium of movable chord shapes by type, a two-page chart in an appendix of UFR covers the ground pretty well.

    My apologies for the digressions, and now, hopefully, back to "mandolin" open voicings.
    Last edited by ubulele; 06-21-2017 at 10:10 AM.

  2. #12
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    Perhaps Ubulele is thinking of "Mastering Chord Inversions for Ukulele" by Mark Kailana Nelson.
    "Who hears music, feels his solitude Peopled at once -- for how count heart-beats plain / Unless a company, with hearts which beat, / Come close to the musician, seen or no?" - Robert Browning, "Balaustion's Adventure"

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by bacchettadavid View Post
    Perhaps Ubulele is thinking of "Mastering Chord Inversions for Ukulele" by Mark Kailana Nelson.
    No, probably a good book, too, but not the one I was thinking of. (And don't get me started on the popular misuse of "inversion" which probably pervades this book if it's in the title.)

    Judging from some of Nelson's other books, his wouldn't be my top choice for a (hopefully) comprehensive guide: his books are very good at what they aim to do, particularly clear for inexperienced players, but they only carry one so far. (I haven't read this particular book, so I could be off-base here; please seek other reviews.)

    I got the impression this other book was pretty soup-to-nuts while remaining readable and clear, easier to follow than UFR, and with more examples and guided exercises. UFR is dense with info and assumes a certain amount of initiative on the reader's part, or perhaps that the reader is working through the book with a mentor. You don't just read the book and absorb by playing through copious examples, you have to practice what is presented in your own way, mostly inventing your own exercises. You may have to carefully reread parts until confusing bits click, until you see the point you missed in a comment or diagram. At times, I found it useful to draw up my own, less cluttered diagrams, so I could visualize the models on the fretboard more clearly.


    Edit: After prowling about, I think my mystery book was either (Mel Bay) Understanding Ukulele Chords by Robbert van Renesse or Ukulele Breakthrough by Calvin Chin. But both were published in 2004, whereas I have the impression my mystery book was published more recently.
    Last edited by ubulele; 06-21-2017 at 05:28 PM.

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