Page 17 of 19 FirstFirst ... 71516171819 LastLast
Results 161 to 170 of 185

Thread: Season 282 - Men In Black

  1. #161
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Aurora, IL US
    Posts
    1,621

    Default

    I never got around to learning this song, "Lucky Dog", which was recorded by Johnny Cash but never released. This video is of Verlon Thompson, the very talented man who wrote the song. He explains the story during the video.
    PS: watch his fingers


  2. #162
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    2,646

    Default

    Low hanging fruit from me again...but I like this song....I first heard it in 2003 as the opening and closing title soundtrack for the film "The Hunted".
    I just realised I forgot to do the spoken part....bum.....

    It's a bit long as well (No --CeeJay...you done a song a bit long ??? Never !!) But I tried three times to get it done a bit quicker , but this is the absolute limit before it loses its power and just becomes a parody. So, long it is !



    Last edited by CeeJay; 07-15-2017 at 05:10 AM.

  3. #163
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Oop North in England
    Posts
    5,075

    Default

    One of Roy Orbison's biggies.

    I notice a few folk have tried singing some of his songs in his original key. I don't think that's necessarily a good idea. If you can reach the notes and it fits the range of your voice, fine but if you are struggling to reach those top notes a) it doesn't sound too good if you miss them but, more importantly b) You will strain your voice and that's not a good thing.

    In popular music, the norm is to change the key of a song to fit your voice. There's nothing sacred about singing in the original key. Even in classical music where singing in the original key is normal practice, singers don't attempt songs or parts if the range is not within the range of their voice. It's important to look after your voice and not to strain it.

    In this case, I had the chords for the song in the key of G but I was not going to hit that final top G comfortably (I can do it but not when singing solo) so I took it down to F where I can quite comfortably reach the final note and it worked just fine.
    Geoff Walker

    I have several ukuleles in various sizes and am not planning on getting any more...

    at least, not yet.

    I also play some blowy things and a squeezy thing

    Internet:
    You Tube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TootlinGeoff
    Soundcloud: http://soundcloud.com/tootlingeoff

  4. #164

    Default


  5. #165
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Apeldoorn, Netherlands
    Posts
    1,030

    Default

    I've done this one for previous seasons, but I thought why not record another one, this is Roy Orbison's She's a Mystery to Me (which was written by U2).
    My youtube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/xommen
    My soundclouds: https://soundcloud.com/wvommen, https://soundcloud.com/uke22live
    The band: http://www.uke22.nl
    My ukes:
    Soprano: Black Korala, Bach Spruce top, Mahalo Steel String Electric
    Concert: Epiphone Les Paul, Ohana CKS-15E, Makawao UK 40
    Tenor:
    Hudson HUK-T.
    Bass: Harley Benton Kahuna CLU Bass.

  6. #166

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tootler View Post
    One of Roy Orbison's biggies.

    I notice a few folk have tried singing some of his songs in his original key. I don't think that's necessarily a good idea. If you can reach the notes and it fits the range of your voice, fine but if you are struggling to reach those top notes a) it doesn't sound too good if you miss them but, more importantly b) You will strain your voice and that's not a good thing.

    In popular music, the norm is to change the key of a song to fit your voice. There's nothing sacred about singing in the original key. Even in classical music where singing in the original key is normal practice, singers don't attempt songs or parts if the range is not within the range of their voice. It's important to look after your voice and not to strain it.

    In this case, I had the chords for the song in the key of G but I was not going to hit that final top G comfortably (I can do it but not when singing solo) so I took it down to F where I can quite comfortably reach the final note and it worked just fine.

    I both agree and disagree with you on this interesting subject, though you sounded good on this song. Obviously if a key is wrong for a person it is gonna sound bad, and of course I don't want anyone to damage their vocal chords from straining. Use common sense is what you're saying. Proper technique is also a key factor of course, which even many superstars don't use. In a solo situation like this changing keys is not as big of a deal, but in band situations, it can be a huge headache, if you learn the parts, especially the instrumental solos, and a singer comes in and wants to sing it in a different key. I've been in disastrous situations with that over the years in bands. Also, some songs just sound "right" in a particular key, I can't explain why, the tone is just correct, and in a different key, they always sound off. Other songs it doesn't seem to matter at all, baffles me, but I've noticed it. Also, I'm not advocating straining ones voice exactly, but sometimes to stretch it out a bit to reach for a note is a good thing, can help with the projection, and confidence, and some songs need that "oomph" to "sell" the song properly I think, again, other songs don't need that. And just for me, sometimes it's just a challenge to see if I can do it in the original key, and a lot of times I do, but I move keys up and down a lot too, so it's not like I'm married to it, or find it sacred, but there is some merit to it. I find this to be an interesting subject, thanks for bringing it up.

  7. #167
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Matamoras, Dauphin County
    Posts
    2,120

    Default

    Heres one Orbison and Cash sang together, along with Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee Lewis, A perrenial favorite, pulled out for Woody Guthrie's Birthday yesterday but my internet was down, (mumble grumble).

    "Inspire me muse to sing of the wanderer, who sailed the wine dark sea and toppled the towers of Ilium"
    "Make a Joyous Noise"
    "Let there be song to fill the air"

    Uncle Tommy's Holiday Camp

  8. #168
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Matamoras, Dauphin County
    Posts
    2,120

    Default

    I would like to weigh in on this one.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tootler View Post
    I notice a few folk have tried singing some of his songs in his original key. I don't think that's necessarily a good idea. If you can reach the notes and it fits the range of your voice, fine but if you are struggling to reach those top notes a) it doesn't sound too good if you miss them but, more importantly b) You will strain your voice and that's not a good thing.

    In popular music, the norm is to change the key of a song to fit your voice. There's nothing sacred about singing in the original key. Even in classical music where singing in the original key is normal practice, singers don't attempt songs or parts if the range is not within the range of their voice. It's important to look after your voice and not to strain it.

    In this case, I had the chords for the song in the key of G but I was not going to hit that final top G comfortably (I can do it but not when singing solo) so I took it down to F where I can quite comfortably reach the final note and it worked just fine.

    Quote Originally Posted by Recovering Bassist View Post
    I both agree and disagree with you on this interesting subject, though you sounded good on this song. Obviously if a key is wrong for a person it is gonna sound bad, and of course I don't want anyone to damage their vocal chords from straining. Use common sense is what you're saying. Proper technique is also a key factor of course, which even many superstars don't use. In a solo situation like this changing keys is not as big of a deal, but in band situations, it can be a huge headache, if you learn the parts, especially the instrumental solos, and a singer comes in and wants to sing it in a different key. I've been in disastrous situations with that over the years in bands. Also, some songs just sound "right" in a particular key, I can't explain why, the tone is just correct, and in a different key, they always sound off. Other songs it doesn't seem to matter at all, baffles me, but I've noticed it. Also, I'm not advocating straining ones voice exactly, but sometimes to stretch it out a bit to reach for a note is a good thing, can help with the projection, and confidence, and some songs need that "oomph" to "sell" the song properly I think, again, other songs don't need that. And just for me, sometimes it's just a challenge to see if I can do it in the original key, and a lot of times I do, but I move keys up and down a lot too, so it's not like I'm married to it, or find it sacred, but there is some merit to it. I find this to be an interesting subject, thanks for bringing it up.
    Geoff and RB have valid points here. I came up as a musician through the Bluegrass and Old Time route. For the most part in these circles you are locked into the "Suzuki Method" i.e. the tunes must always be played in the same designated key. This might be good for teaching seven year olds how to play the fiddle but is an arbitrary and meaningless distinction for people playing music. Ait annoys me when some Old Time performer gets in a huff when I play Golden Slippers in G, like they have done in Philadelphia at least since the Advent of The Mummers Parade, rather than D like somebody from Virginia always played it on his back porch. Similarly If I want to play "Yellow Rose of Texas" or "Angeline the Baker" In the Keys thet were written in, there is a stunned silence. Geoff is right in the main. The singer should be able to choose their own key. RB is also correct that certain songs don't sound right in certain keys, tough call there. A while ago I sat in with a local uke group at a nursing home gig. Five of us did 35 songs in an hour, all from some ukulele songbook bible. I was told to play it like it was written, forget the back beat! One song was done in Eb or something. None of us could comfortably sing in that key. My suggestion is to play a song in thev kery that sounds best to you!
    "Inspire me muse to sing of the wanderer, who sailed the wine dark sea and toppled the towers of Ilium"
    "Make a Joyous Noise"
    "Let there be song to fill the air"

    Uncle Tommy's Holiday Camp

  9. #169

    Default

    Here's one I've always wanted to try, love the intensity on the Cash record of this song.


  10. #170
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Eastern CT
    Posts
    442

    Default

    I almost did this one when we had a Leonard Cohen season a while back, but I'm glad I saved it for now. Like damn near everyone over the last few decades, Johnny Cash did a version of this Cohen song. My version owes a lot more to him than to any other rendition I've heard.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •