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Thread: Alternatives to a strap

  1. #21
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    A strap button DRILLED into my beautiful mango Pono?!?!?!?

    :thud:



    OK, I'm hearing that a real strap is probably the way to go.

    There is a music store near by that sells guitars and I'm sure they could do it, but I don't like the vibes I get in there. They seem kind of shoddy. I don't think I would trust them.

    I watched "got a uke" and saw it done. I have a drill. I think I have a tiny drill bit, too. If not, I can get one. I can find strap buttons. I can even practice on my Lanikai concert.

    Heck! I FINALLY got over my fear and put new strings on it. This will be a breeze, right?

    :thud:



    I'll keep you posted!
    Jan >^..^<
    (AKA Chopped Liver)

    You say 'Crazy Cat Lady' like it's a bad thing!

    "Out of clutter, find simplicity." Albert Einstein

    "Hold everything with open hands." PereBourik

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graham Greenbag View Post
    I'd be interested to read her past posts and comments - bound to be something worthwhile there - but haven't managed to find her on the members list. Does anyone know what name she uses here?
    try this: http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/...p?113721-Sammu

  3. #23
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    Please do not let my comments be the ones that encourage you to work on your Pono. The Uke I fitted a button to would cost me about £75 to replace ($100?) and despite making a 'spot on' job of it I'm reluctant to do my more expensive Ukes (the dearest of which cost a mere £150) for fear of messing the job up or otherwise devaluing them. That reluctance might not be sensible - Ukes are meant to be played and enjoyed rather than continually kept safe in a display cabinet or case - and I really should just get on with it and carefully do the work.

    I'm reasonably skilled with hand tools but if I weren't then I'd take my Uke to someone who I both trusted and was widely known to be capable, and doubly so if I had a Pono! If the local music store and tradesmen aren't giving you confidence then please do wait and look for the right person to do the work for you ...... and select something really tasteful to match your beautiful Pono.
    Last edited by Graham Greenbag; 07-09-2017 at 04:23 AM.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Booli View Post
    try this ....
    Many thanks, I'll do just that. It's nice to have stars amongst us, and I hope that members, etc., respect that privilege. Unfortunately her old posts don't seem to be listed, pity but that's how it goes.
    Last edited by Graham Greenbag; 07-09-2017 at 04:02 AM.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chopped Liver View Post
    A strap button DRILLED into my beautiful mango Pono?!?!?!?

    :thud:
    ...
    If power tools make you uncomfortable, there is always a hand drill, aka a 'pin vise' that may be easier to control, they are not really expensive, and most times come with smaller diameter drill bits, which may be of the correct size for the screw used in a strap button. See below on Amazon for examples:


    https://www.amazon.com/Fiskars-Manua.../dp/B000ON00IA


    https://www.amazon.com/Fiskars-85116.../dp/B00004T80S

    When I've installed a strap button on my own ukes, I use a dremel tool with a thin drill bit, and place the uke upside down (headstock to the floor), and hold it between my knees, and then try to keep the drill perpendicular to the flat butt-end of the uke while also straight up-and-down. It may not be absolutely perfectly the same every time, but I've never had a problem.

    Prior to drilling, I put a strip of painters tape over the area, and then measure excatly 50% of the depth and make a pencil mark, and then also try to 'eyeball' the center (left-to-right), and make another mark.

    Usually if larger than a soprano the sides of the uke are 2 different pieces of wood, and you can see the seam, which is the 'center' as per it's construction (unless it was poorly made).

    However, if all the above is too intimidating, as Graham has said, finding a trustworthy and experienced person to do it is likely going to be less stressful for you.

    An experienced shop should not charge more than $15-20 for both the strap button itself AND the labor to install it. If they wanted $50 for the job, I'd tell them to kiss the sky.

    But 'nobody' will tell you there is a law for having, or not having a strap - it is what makes your own life easier that is most important.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graham Greenbag View Post
    Many thanks, I'll do just that. It's nice to have stars amongst us, and I hope that members, etc., respect that privilege. Unfortunately her old posts don't seem to be listed, pity but that's how it goes.
    If you click the link to her profile (above) you will only see maybe the past 90 days of posts on her profile page, HOWEVER, in the left column of ANY UU profile, you can click the link 'FIND LATEST POSTS' and that will show their entire history in reverse-chronological order (in a very differently formatted display on the screen), the most recent of which for Samantha was in May 2016...

    BTW - this works for all UU members.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graham Greenbag View Post
    Please do not let my comments be the ones that encourage you to work on your Pono. The Uke I fitted a button to would cost me about £75 to replace ($100?) and despite making a 'spot on' job of it I'm reluctant to do my more expensive Ukes (the dearest of which cost a mere £150) for fear of messing the job up or otherwise devaluing them. That reluctance might not be sensible - Ukes are meant to be played and enjoyed rather than continually kept safe in a display cabinet or case - and I really should just get on with it and carefully do the work.

    I'm reasonably skilled with hand tools but if I weren't then I'd take my Uke to someone who I both trusted and was widely known to be capable, and doubly so if I had a Pono! If the local music store and tradesmen aren't giving you confidence then please do wait and look for the right person to do the work for you ...... and select something really tasteful to match your beautiful Pono.
    I hear you! And yet, as you say, they are meant to be played. No point in having the pono if I can't play it.

    Don't worry! If I do it, I will not hold you responsible!
    Jan >^..^<
    (AKA Chopped Liver)

    You say 'Crazy Cat Lady' like it's a bad thing!

    "Out of clutter, find simplicity." Albert Einstein

    "Hold everything with open hands." PereBourik

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Booli View Post
    If power tools make you uncomfortable, there is always a hand drill, aka a 'pin vise' that may be easier to control, they are not really expensive, and most times come with smaller diameter drill bits, which may be of the correct size for the screw used in a strap button. See below on Amazon for examples:


    https://www.amazon.com/Fiskars-Manua.../dp/B000ON00IA


    https://www.amazon.com/Fiskars-85116.../dp/B00004T80S

    When I've installed a strap button on my own ukes, I use a dremel tool with a thin drill bit, and place the uke upside down (headstock to the floor), and hold it between my knees, and then try to keep the drill perpendicular to the flat butt-end of the uke while also straight up-and-down. It may not be absolutely perfectly the same every time, but I've never had a problem.

    Prior to drilling, I put a strip of painters tape over the area, and then measure excatly 50% of the depth and make a pencil mark, and then also try to 'eyeball' the center (left-to-right), and make another mark.

    Usually if larger than a soprano the sides of the uke are 2 different pieces of wood, and you can see the seam, which is the 'center' as per it's construction (unless it was poorly made).

    However, if all the above is too intimidating, as Graham has said, finding a trustworthy and experienced person to do it is likely going to be less stressful for you.

    An experienced shop should not charge more than $15-20 for both the strap button itself AND the labor to install it. If they wanted $50 for the job, I'd tell them to kiss the sky.

    But 'nobody' will tell you there is a law for having, or not having a strap - it is what makes your own life easier that is most important.
    Thanks for the details!
    Jan >^..^<
    (AKA Chopped Liver)

    You say 'Crazy Cat Lady' like it's a bad thing!

    "Out of clutter, find simplicity." Albert Einstein

    "Hold everything with open hands." PereBourik

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by ubulele View Post
    When I'm not using a standard strap, I still use a uke thong, though you wear it around the neck, which you said you don't like. I haven't tried a uke leash, because I mainly want support for the body, but I know a lot of folks like them, and Lori's system is somewhat adaptable. I tried the Mobius strap, and it's a great option for standing, but I found that when I sat (as I mostly do), there wouldn't be enough weight on the strap at all times, to keep it taut, so it would rise up where it passes under the strings and make contact with them. If you position the uke higher than I usually do, you might not have this problem, and of course, I don't have shapely breasts, so I have no idea how that effects the equation.

    The other thing about the Mobius strap is that you can't quickly change ukes—with a thong, it's the work of seconds; I don't know what's involved with a leash, but if I recall it's just a matter of unsnapping from one headstock adapter onto another. (That's another downside to the leash: you'd want an adapter for every uke you play regularly, and an extra for occasional use with other ukes. Can get spendy—a reason I just decided to get dedicated straps, with more stability still.)
    I mostly play sitting. Good points! Thank you!
    Jan >^..^<
    (AKA Chopped Liver)

    You say 'Crazy Cat Lady' like it's a bad thing!

    "Out of clutter, find simplicity." Albert Einstein

    "Hold everything with open hands." PereBourik

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chopped Liver View Post
    I just heard back from her. So, this is what she said:

    I tried using a guitar style Ergoplay Tappert rest. It is too big, however, for the soprano and I stopped using it as it kept falling off. Now I use a strap and find the uke is held securely and my hands are free.. She asked them to make one for the ukulele but they said they had one for it. It is too big for soprano.

    So, now I have to decide between the uke leash (ukelease.com) or the mobius strap (mobiusstrap.com). Any suggestions?

    After her e-mail, I decided to ask which of her books I should start on as a beginner and got her response to that, so that is good! Thanks for suggesting I e-mail her, Booli!

    And because someone might ask which books she suggested:
    Probably the best book to start with is Carulli. Iíve just done a Carulli Volume 2 but Iíd say go for the 1st one. It has right hand fingering maps which are good to practise if you are a beginner finger picker. Donít get too strung up (pun!) on the rights and wrongs of right hand fingerings. It should be instinctive but takes some detailed practise before you get to this level. The Right Hand Technique book and fingering maps are suggestions - there is no absolutes because everyone is slightly different. The exercises are just that - exercises.

    Sor is also good. All of the books have a variety of standards.
    My vote is for the Uke Leash ukeleash.com, and if you don't like it you can return it. I am a bit biased, but I can guarantee good customer service.

    Are you in the USA? International shipping can get expensive.
    ĖLori

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