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Thread: Barre for a G chord

  1. #1
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    Default Barre for a G chord

    Let me preface this question with the fact I've only been playing for three or four months.

    I saw a YouTube video where the G chord was barred on the 2nd fret across the C,E and A strings and the E string fretted on the 3rd fret. I don't know why I didn't think to play it like that as it is very easy to do.

    Is there a technical reason not to play it that way? I realize that there are many ways to play the same thing, but I just wondered if more experienced players do this but when they teach they use the three finger fretted method in order to not confuse beginners?

  2. #2
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    The simple answer to your question is beginners usually find barr chords difficult. I know some people that have been playing for a year or more and can't play barr chord.
    Ukuleles.............yes please !!!!

  3. #3
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    Barring it the way you describe also frees up the other fingers to play other notes up the neck. You'll be able to reach much farther and still play the chord.

  4. #4
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    Thank you both. Appreciate the input

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by DownUpDave View Post
    I know some people that have been playing for a year or more and can't play barr chord.
    Thanks for not mentioning my name Dave
    All the best,
    Campbell

  6. #6
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    That's basically the F shape moved up two frets. Moveable everywhere.
    "If a lot of people play the ukulele, the world would be a better place to live."

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by cohenja View Post
    Let me preface this question with the fact I've only been playing for three or four months.

    I saw a YouTube video where the G chord was barred on the 2nd fret across the C,E and A strings and the E string fretted on the 3rd fret. I don't know why I didn't think to play it like that as it is very easy to do.

    Is there a technical reason not to play it that way? I realize that there are many ways to play the same thing, but I just wondered if more experienced players do this but when they teach they use the three finger fretted method in order to not confuse beginners?
    I'm not an expert (just been playing a couple of years or so and learning all the time) but I find that there can often be more than one way to achieve the same thing and that some things work better for some folks than others.

    In my limited experience beginners typically find 'Barre Chords' to be difficult if not impossible to do effectively, I've found that mine have improved with practice, observation (part of which is to individually check that each string rings) and a well set up Uke. I suspect that, like a lot of other things, it's easy when you know how and a puzzle of imperfect results until then. I used to find the Bb chord impossible but four out of five times it's fine for me now, practice and looking at what's happening (or not) helps. I've a good idea of what I'm not always doing correctly and barre chords are still work in progress for me - some things in Uke playing take a lot of time to get consistently right.

    Early on in learning I too noticed that the G chord could be played with just two fingers but I find that (for me now) it's normally quicker and more reliable to use three. Of course YMMV but I suggest that you too will find it better to keep things simple and reliable by using the 'standard' three fingers for now.

    I'd leave the moveable F chord and barre (another way to play a G chord, and higher ones up the neck) alone for now too. To my mind there's no point learning to run before you can walk so the barre chords should be left until you're no longer a beginner.
    Last edited by Graham Greenbag; 07-21-2017 at 10:59 PM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alytw View Post
    Barring it the way you describe also frees up the other fingers to play other notes up the neck. You'll be able to reach much farther and still play the chord.
    Also you can move up and bar the third fret and use an A formation instead of the F formation, and you have a C. Move that up two frets to he fifth, and you have a D. You have the I-IV-V progression in the key of G right there. If you didn't already know that. A lot of people do that. Change the A formation to an A7 formation on the IV and the V and you have a twelve bar blues progression that you can just slide up and down between that G, C7, and D7.
    I don't want to live in a world that is linear.
    There's more than one road into Richmond. Lil' Rev
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2LEY9E_W5sw

  9. #9
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    Rit on. Barre chords open up a whole new world. Learn them as soon as you can.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by cohenja View Post
    Let me preface this question with the fact I've only been playing for three or four months.

    I saw a YouTube video where the G chord was barred on the 2nd fret across the C,E and A strings and the E string fretted on the 3rd fret. I don't know why I didn't think to play it like that as it is very easy to do.

    Is there a technical reason not to play it that way? I realize that there are many ways to play the same thing, but I just wondered if more experienced players do this but when they teach they use the three finger fretted method in order to not confuse beginners?
    for me, the only consideration is transitioning. If you use the 3-finger technique then you can easily attain the Gsus2, the Gsus4, or the G6 chord and even the Eminor chord by moving one finger. If you're not needing to do those things, then the barre chord serves your purpose.

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