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Thread: Leeward Lounge Ukes, back to the drawing board

  1. #21
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    Jan 2011
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    Waterford, WI
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sven View Post
    I like the design, very curious about the brass binding. How will you glue it? And that end block looks a bit massive. I think you could use some half inch baltic plywood so it doesn't stick into the soundboard as far.
    From what I've read on a pen makers forum, Titebond CA glue works well if you rough up the gluing surface a bit. I will test it out first, and if it doesn't work I'll try some type of slow setting epoxy. As for the end block, you are probably right, now that I've stared at it for a while. I got the dimensions for it from the Hana Lima Ia plans, which I've made dozens of. Should I worry about soundboard deflection if the end block isn't as wide?
    Last edited by finkdaddy; 08-22-2017 at 06:48 AM.

  2. #22
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    I have used large end blocks, but noticed on a spruce soundboard that it telegraphed as a flat spot when the rest was domed. So I started slanting the top of the block so the contact area was as wide as the lining strip. Then I started using thinner blocks so the entire block is now as deep as my lining. Width I keep at around 35 mm, would that be 1 1/2 inch..?
    Building blog - http://www.argapa.blogspot.com
    Music and atrocities - http://www.goodcopbadcop.se

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sven View Post
    I have used large end blocks, but noticed on a spruce soundboard that it telegraphed as a flat spot when the rest was domed. So I started slanting the top of the block so the contact area was as wide as the lining strip. Then I started using thinner blocks so the entire block is now as deep as my lining. Width I keep at around 35 mm, would that be 1 1/2 inch..?
    Great, Sven. Thanks for the advice! I was planning a flat, hardwood top but having a domed bottom. Either way, your same advice applies. I really appreciate it.

  4. #24
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    I've been working a lot on my new design. I'm going to try a zero-fret on this one. It took a while for me to wrap my mind around the way it works, but I think I have it all worked out on paper now. Now I have to work out my neck geometry and profile. I'm very excited to get this build going!
    IMG-0497.jpg

  5. #25
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    Little River, California
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    Time to put the pencil down and start putting saws to wood and make some saw dust. Good luck!

  6. #26
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    I think it looks very exciting and elegant. One question though, are you sure the C- and E-strings won't hit the tuners of the G and A? I can't tell on the screen.

    Sven
    Building blog - http://www.argapa.blogspot.com
    Music and atrocities - http://www.goodcopbadcop.se

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sven View Post
    I think it looks very exciting and elegant. One question though, are you sure the C- and E-strings won't hit the tuners of the G and A? I can't tell on the screen.

    Sven
    I have thought of that. It will be pretty close. When the tuners get in I will measure them before I cut anything for the headstock. Since the posts aren't as wide as the holes for the machines, I think I will be ok. If not, I will bump out that angle by the nut by about 5 degrees or so and that should give me some more space.

    Thanks for the input, guys!

  8. #28
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    So, while I'm waiting around for raw materials to arrive, I have been making all new jigs, and templates to accommodate my new design.

    One of the scariest things I've done is to make a new bending form and alter the shape of my Waldron side bending machine. My upper bout is so narrow that the machine as it came didn't work for my design, so I had to disassemble it, cut nearly an inch off the front of it, and reassemble it. It worked fine, but since that side of the machine is so much shorter, the springs didn't work the way they were designed to, so I had to pull that side in tighter with some twine while the machine did it's magic.

    The other alteration I had to make on it was to make the waist shaping part of it much narrower because the waist on my design is so narrow. That was no fun at all! The metal that is used on it is way thicker than I had imagined, so it was pretty tricky to bend the steel back into place and get it all screwed back together.

    I was scared to make any changes to the bender, because I was afraid of messing it up and it wasn't exactly cheap! But when it was all apart I traced all of the pieces onto large sheets of paper and stored them away just in case I had to make new parts. Fortunately, it all worked out ok.

    I've got this one solved, so it's on to the next thing!

    IMG-0513.jpg

    ps, I have no idea why that pic is sideways.

  9. #29
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    I would love a Waldron bender but can't afford one so I made a primitive bender that works ok. Made out of scrap around the shop which keeps costs down to a couple bucks. Design and construction self explanatory. Uses aluminium gutter material as heat conveyor (not ideal, steel better but it was available and works ok) and a heat gun as heat source. Side plates wet down and wrapped in a aluminum foil. Tape to hold down where necessary and a big honkin clamp for the waist caul.

    DSCN7476.jpg

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by sequoia View Post
    I would love a Waldron bender but can't afford one so I made a primitive bender that works ok. Made out of scrap around the shop which keeps costs down to a couple bucks. Design and construction self explanatory. Uses aluminium gutter material as heat conveyor (not ideal, steel better but it was available and works ok) and a heat gun as heat source. Side plates wet down and wrapped in a aluminum foil. Tape to hold down where necessary and a big honkin clamp for the waist caul.

    DSCN7476.jpg
    Pretty cool! It's essentially the same thing as the Waldron bender. I don't know that I could work without a heat blanket anymore though. I rely on it too much!

    Apparently my cat, Talulah, has decided to help me with my drawings. She's soooooo helpful!

    Talulah.jpg

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