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Thread: New Top and Back Clamping Method: Not Happy

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    central CA
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    554

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    I'm with Michael N. Go bar deck is quick and effective
    My Real name is Terry Harris

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Little River, California
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    1,475

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevs-the-name View Post
    As a hobby builder, I love this method...

    You have already said it does a champion job of clamping!
    Whats the rush
    I hear ya. What's the rush, but there is a practical side too. I timed how long it took me on the back and it was about 12 minutes. This is approaching the point where aliphatic glue (ie Titebond) is starting to set and skin over and optimal bonding is not taking place. Maybe just glue anxiety. Anyway, the method gave me absolutely beautiful perfect joins because I could perfectly control the clamping pressure. Not too tight not too loose. Love that. ... I'm already thinking how to speed things up and make it more efficient. Shorter bolts is a good start. Those are 6 1/2 inch and 5 inch would work fine. That is by my calculation 33 inches of less screwing. Less screwing is better! I like the idea of a regular nut and a driver. The way to go for sure because I'm not into butterfly nuts.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Stockton on Tees..North East UK.
    Posts
    4,258

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    I wouldn't change my method, with driver and set screws and clamps ...put together in less than two minutes.
    http://ukulele-innovation.tripod.com ebay i/d squarepeg_3000

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
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    Not that I've used it that much but I love my go-bar deck... I incorporated it into my workbench on a lazy susan bearing.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Oregon
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    59

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    Is there any reason the spool clamps are round? They would be just as good square with cork pads and a nut and a nut driver rather than a wing nut and easier to make.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    UK
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    987

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    Don't have to be round. Mine are but I think I just used some pre turned stock, dowel or broom handle, sliced up and T- nuts inserted. It must be 35 years since I made them, still going strong. I've had to oil the threads a few times. Once oiled they spin fast, a lot faster than wing nuts, although they probably can't compete with a drill driver.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
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    524

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    Quote Originally Posted by FarmerBill View Post
    Is there any reason the spool clamps are round? They would be just as good square with cork pads and a nut and a nut driver rather than a wing nut and easier to make.
    I made my own spool clamps, rectangular with cork pads for protection. They work with wing nuts which I have zero issues with. Takes just a few minutes to glue a top or back on.
    Kind Regards
    Dennis

    dpophotography@yahoo.co.nz
    Southern Cross banjo ukes
    New Zealand

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Little River, California
    Posts
    1,475

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    Quote Originally Posted by Timbuck View Post
    I wouldn't change my method, with driver and set screws and clamps ...put together in less than two minutes.
    OK ok. I will quit whining. I'm going to cut the bolts way down to about 5 threads and I will try to match your time of 2 minutes. Three cups of coffee, get set, get ready go!... Anyway, I'm loving the results. Perfect clamping pressure all around.

    Yes, yes the blocks could be square or any shape one wanted. Even perfectly matching the curves (over kill?). Square might even be better. It is just that round dowl is so available when I made the clamps.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Waterford, WI
    Posts
    400

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    I actually just use green, painters masking tape. Works great as long as there's not too much wood to trim off from the edges.

  10. #20

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    Here is another way. The photo is a set-up, because I had already cut some binding ledges. Obviously, those would not be there and the back would be slightly overhanging when I'm really gluing a back on. One hand will hold all the spring clamps needed to do a uke back. Takes less than 2 minutes to put a back on with very precise control of where you want the pressure.The same clamps work for guitar sizes or uke sizes. Since I started using these maybe 30 years ago, I've done many hundreds of instruments in mixed guitar and uses sizes. You can bend them in or out to get the tension for the body size, and the spring steel never loses it's spring tension. Pretty amazing stuff. Excellent for repairs too. A single box spring and a hacksaw, or better a cheap pair of bolt cutters will supply all the clamps needed to do several instruments at a time. The ends are 1/2" dowel drilled half way through in a press fit size for the spring. The jagged cut end of the spring sticks nicely into the wood and seldom falls off. The base has a radius to match the top and a hole where the sound hole is for glue clean-up. The whole deal is very light and can be put aside to dry without awkward clamps falling off. Works for me, though admittedly I have not been very successful in convincing others to try it.
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