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Thread: low G string resonating too long

  1. #11
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    Box physics is a problem too, but not the same problem. If you went mad and put a soprano neck on a baritone body you'd still have problems with a low G because the scale length is too short for the string to work effectively.

    And conversely, put a baritone neck on a soprano body when the strings will work fine, but the body can't reproduce the sound effectively.

    Most people recognise that body size makes a difference, but it's harder to understand intuitively why scale length does too.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ProfChris View Post
    though of course the nut slot will require widening
    Another common misconception! I've put low G on several sopranos and longneck sopranos, and have never had to widen a nut slot. Wound strings tend to work better than fluorocarbons if this is a concern.

  3. #13
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    In addition to the sound advice given above - using less attack on that particular string - there are also techniques to stop the string(s) from ringing, using either your fretting hand or your strumming hand, like putting the palm or a finger on the string(s) or lessening the pressure of your fretting fingers momentarily. There are many types of music which require this sort of playing, especially with fast rhythms and quickly changing chords. An example is featured in this video, starting at about 0:57.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVOKN_5dG_s

  4. #14

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    Wow, very helpful, thanks all!!

    Yeah, the original set works great: no squeaks, all resonating for the same length of time.
    The first low G was squeaky AND resonating way longer.
    The second low G isn't squeaky, but still resonates longer than the three remaining original strings.

    The issue doesn't come up in strumming so much as in picking, where three strings stop singing shortly after a pluck, but one just keeps going and going, lol. In strumming, they're all hit over and over again in the same intervals so it sorts itself.

    Sounds like there are multiple potential variables, so I'll start checking them out one at a time.

  5. #15
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    I've found that any problem with the equipment, other than something obvious, usually isn't the equipment, but is usually Yours Truly.
    DEPENDENTS:

    In order of age:

    Kamaka HF-4 Baritone C Linear Tuning 6/2009
    Martin C-1K Concert, Bb Re-entrant Tuning 4/2014
    KoAloha KTM-00 Tenor C Linear Tuning 7/2014
    Kala KA-SRMT-TRI Tenor C Linear Tuning 6/1/2015
    Pono MTD-CR Tenor C Re-entrant Tuning 6/21/2016
    Koaloha KCM-00 Concert Bb Linear Tuning 4/20/2017

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by janeray1940 View Post
    People will say "low G doesn't work on soprano," but then as evidence that it can - Ohta-San.

    Jane, Ohta-San is a tiresome and misleading example that's brought up all the time when this topic comes up. If you want to share your personal experience and tell folks how it's worked in your case, fine, but there are a lot of beginners on this site and you do them a big disservice by not pointing out the obvious in your lead-in.

    There's a big, giant electric chord coming out of the bottom of that instrument. Surely you must understand that amplification takes acoustics out of the equation, but not everyone reading your post or listening to that video may grasp that. There's too much misleading information on the internet in general. No need to contribute here with this sort of thing.
    Dirk Wormhoudt



    website: http://www.southcoastukes.com

    email: sales@southcoastukes.com

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by southcoastukes View Post
    Jane, Ohta-San is a tiresome and misleading example that's brought up all the time when this topic comes up. If you want to share your personal experience and tell folks how it's worked in your case, fine, but there are a lot of beginners on this site and you do them a big disservice by not pointing out the obvious in your lead-in.

    There's a big, giant electric chord coming out of the bottom of that instrument. Surely you must understand that amplification takes acoustics out of the equation, but not everyone reading your post or listening to that video may grasp that. There's too much misleading information on the internet in general. No need to contribute here with this sort of thing.
    Agree to disagree here - I think it's fair to present both sides to the story. I was once a beginner too, and struggled to play larger instruments because low G supposedly "didn't work" on soprano. It took me a few years before I had the bright idea of - wow, lightbulb moment! - try it for myself and see.

    And you know what? I'm fine with it. I'm not a professional player, I don't play amplified, but it works for me and for the ensemble that I play in. Personally I don't give a hoot about the science behind all of this - I play for fun, and I think that's true for a lot of folks on this forum.

    Feel free to ignore me going forward and I'll do the same for you.

  8. #18
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    wow - that went bad pretty quick...

    I guess Aloha is forgotten, and tolerance is now lost here.

    Sad to say, but it seems to have taken a dark turn...just shaka, for just a moment and take a nice, deep breath, and think how our words and actions can harm other folks...

    Compassion can go a long way.

    Mahalo.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by southcoastukes View Post
    If you want to share your personal experience and tell folks how it's worked in your case, fine, but there are a lot of beginners on this site .......
    .......& that is why I said it works perfectly well - from personal experience.
    Keith M --> likes a long neck - & being different.....

  10. #20
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    Booli, I don't see it quite as negative. Most of the posts do deal with the original question, give explanations as to where the problem might come from and/or provide advice for how it could be resolved. Rightly connected to this are the facts about physics (body volume and scale length), which I find very interesting and good to know, especially for beginners, along with examples of contradicting personal experience and preferences, which I find informative as well.

    What I learned from this discussion is that sheer physics work against the endeavour of having a soprano strung with low G, but that there are plenty of personal arrangements to make it work subjectively for several members of this forum as well as for a respected musician such as Ohta-San. With these arguments in mind, I think anyone can and should go out to find what he or she personally likes.

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