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Thread: Interesting accident

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Waterford, WI
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    399

    Default Interesting accident

    I haven't built a uke in quite a while. So, I had a piece of wood thicknessed for sides that I had lying around and I decided to practice with it and make sure that my new bending form worked right.

    I cut it into 2 lengths and put them into my bender, 1 piece at a time.
    The second piece came out just perfect, but I wasn't paying attention on my first piece and let it go about 150 degrees hotter than I would normally let it go. I only noticed when my shop suddenly got hazy and the whole place filled with the scent of burning wood!

    In a panic, I turned everything off, unplugged the heating blanket, and let it all cool down. In the end, no damage was done to anything. The clamps on the Waldron bender got a bit scorched, as well as the edges of my newly designed bending form, but it was all very, very minor.

    However, the biggest surprise was how the bent side turned out. It looks gorgeous! If I had a way to control this effect, I might even use it for an entire uke. If I tried duplicating this with an oven, I wonder if I would do it before or after I bent the wood?

    Anyways, here is some pics of the two pieces side by side. Keep in mind that they were both from the same piece of wood!

    IMG_0511.jpg

    IMG_0512.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
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    JoCo, NC (near Raleigh)
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    Default

    I know Timbuck has experimented with baking wood prior to use, e.g. for fretboards. I'm not a luthier so I have no idea about the long term effects of this practice, but seems like it would really mess with the moisture content if nothing else.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Herts, UK
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    Default

    That's a "feature" that you can charge more for. Tell the customer that only one side was cooked to enhance the sustain <insert alternative BS lie>
    ... Or just break out the tin of dark stain and deny everything...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
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    523

    Default

    Put it together as is, looks cool, or hot if you prefer.
    Kind Regards
    Dennis

    dpophotography@yahoo.co.nz
    Southern Cross banjo ukes
    New Zealand

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Waterford, WI
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    399

    Default

    Ha! These were just scrap pieces for testing. But I think it would be cool to make a uke with drastically different colors of wood. You could mismatch the sides, like I did above, and also the book matching of the tops, bottoms, and headstock veneer!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
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    Grand Junction, Colorado
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    Default

    You can buy 'torrified' maple like this.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    central CA
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    Default

    I think that side was torturefied
    My Real name is Terry Harris

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Berkshire
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    336

    Default

    Following timbucks tips I tried cooking pine like this for Petes 4x2 challenge. It works great but I doubt it's be fun to bend after

  9. #9
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    The Vikings used torrefied wood because it absorbs less moisture so size and shape are more likely to remain consistent after it has been sawed and planed. In other words it’s stronger and more stable as well as being lighter, which means it’s equally well suited to shipbuilding, wooden flooring and guitar making.

    Guitar manufacturers such as Rickenbacker have long been using heat-treated timber for this very reason – while making no claims of tonal superiority. In recent years, Gibson has utilised torrefied maple for some fingerboards as an alternative to rosewood.
    Read more about it here
    http://www.theguitarmagazine.com/fea...-torrefaction/
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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
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    Default

    Torrefied wood still needs to be humidified- ALL wood absorbs/ releases moisture

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