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Thread: Popular chord transitions to work on with E chord

  1. #1
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    Default Popular chord transitions to work on with E chord

    Hi all,

    I am working on a variety of things with my uke, currently spenidng time with the E chord. I am wondering, in general, what are the chords you tend to see before and after E in the songs you play?

    Basically, I want to practice the E chord by moving from E to other chords and back again - but dont want to just randomly practice E-F over and over or E-C just 'cuz I can do them easy, especially if they are not usually found in real songs.

    This question comes from the fact that I have been teaching myself acoustic guitar the last couple of years and realized a few things as I was teaching myself that would have made it easier (i.e. different fingerings for chords to make for easier/better transition to other ones etc). I simply want to avoid some of the mistakes I have made with guitar as I am learning ukulele.

    Thanks all.

  2. #2
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    please email me at ( rohiguchi@seattleschools.org ) and I will share some
    possibilities with you.

    they will be in the key of Eb, but you'll get the picture.

    also, please check my Ukulele Boot Camp materials in my signature below for
    other suggestions for other keys. Each Practice Sheet is a transposition of
    every other sheet (if that makes sense).

    anyway, I hope it helps

    Also, any other UU member who would like the Practice Sheets for the keys
    of Bb and Eb, please email me at the address above.

    keep uke'in',
    Uncle Rod Higuchi
    ( rohiguchi@gmail.com )

    MP3s: http://www.mediafire.com/?50db7nls4o6m6
    Ukulele Boot Camp, FREE Songbook, Holiday Songbook & More: http://ukulelebootcamp.weebly.com

  3. #3

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    In what musical keys the E-chord is most used?

    In E of course, but also the neighboring keys A and B. Neighboring in the circle of fifth sense. Also A minor, but in it you can usually use the E7 chord.

    I could give the 3 most important chords in those major keys, but they have also other chords and their change, into E and to them from E, that you should practice, so a songbook maybe. A is they key with 3 sharps and B with 5 #s, E key is with 4.
    Last edited by Jarmo_S; 09-13-2017 at 08:33 AM.

  4. #4
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    Not to be too much Captain Obvious but if you are looking for transitions in "actual songs"
    to practice, nothing beats looking up actual songs!
    Blues-y tunes in A or E will use the E chord a lot.
    You will also come across C#m with E if you are playing rock.
    Just play!
    1:5255
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  5. #5

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    From this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circle_of_fifths you can find the the basic 6 chords in every major key.

    I paste from it:

    -------------------------------------------------------
    The major and minor chords in each major key:

    I ii iii IV V vi

    C major: C Dm Em F G Am
    G major: G Am Bm C D Em
    D major: D Em F♯m G A Bm
    A major: A Bm C♯m D E F♯m
    E major: E F♯m G♯m A B C♯m
    B major: B C♯m D♯m E F♯ G♯m
    F♯ major: F♯ G♯m A♯m B C♯ D♯m
    G♭ major: G♭ A♭m B♭m C♭ D♭ E♭m
    D♭ major: D♭ E♭m Fm G♭ A♭ B♭m
    A♭ major: A♭ B♭m Cm D♭ E♭ Fm
    E♭ major: E♭ Fm Gm A♭ B♭ Cm
    B♭ major: B♭ Cm Dm E♭ F Gm
    F major: F Gm Am B♭ C Dm
    -------------------------------------------------

    In songbooks you are not likely to find many songs in the key of B, but some in A and E. Ukulele is a nice instrument for an accompanist, because it is C-centric

    Those are only 3 note chords, but important are also ii7, iii7, V7 and maybe vi7 too. And Imaj7 and IVmaj7 could be played too.

    Then there are the minor keys and things get even more complicated. I think those are a lot already.

    I just practice songs.
    Last edited by Jarmo_S; 09-13-2017 at 10:10 AM.

  6. #6

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    Regarding the E chord, I always use this fingering:
    1x02
    I mute the C string with my index finger that is producing the 3rd. It is an easy piecy chord to play

    The alternative 1402 does not give any new notes or anything, so it basically sucks, because it makes just for harder fingering.
    The 4442 gives also nothing else except the 3rd is on 2nd string so it my be heard better than on the 4th string when strumming?

    Given that ukulele is not a guitar and not able to give such a deep E chord for blues. etc and also how seldom it is needed in any songbook songs, I do recommend the 1x02 fingering for all, except maybe for low G string users.

    Now this analysis is then for the normal re entrant stringing.
    I posted this advice already on the E chord alternatives sticky thread, but wanted to post here too if some might have not read it or otherwise not knowing this.
    Last edited by Jarmo_S; 09-15-2017 at 02:03 AM.

  7. #7
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    I haven't thought 1x02 before. 1x02 sounds better than 444x. Thank you Jarmo!
    Kamaka HF-1 100

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