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Thread: Scale techniques/practice: what scale to do after Major and Minor

  1. #1

    Default Scale techniques/practice: what scale to do after Major and Minor

    Been practicing the 1st position major and natural minor scale up and down the neck (along with the 4th position of both). Wondering what I should do next?

    Do I learn the 2nd through 5th forms of the major, or do I move to pentatonic or something else?

    Thanks for the advice...
    Ukes: Kamaka, Kanilea, Martin, Haiku, Luna, Ko'Aloha

    To My Heroes of WW2: All gave some; some gave all; Nisei solders gave more.

  2. #2
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    All the best,
    Campbell

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    You sound like a beginner music student. "Done. What's next to master??"

    Keep going over the basics of running through all major and minor scales most importantly in the higher positions not just first position.
    And focus on clarity, articulation, then speed.
    I practice on a Yamaha gl1 6 string it has a very high action but I practiced scales on it slowly that now after several months I am able to speed through scales clearly on a high action fretboard.
    Even the masters keep working on the elementary basics.
    Keep doing them.
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  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Debussychopin View Post
    You sound like a beginner music student. "Done. What's next to master??"
    Yup. I am a beginner.

    Quote Originally Posted by Debussychopin View Post
    Keep going over the basics of running through all major and minor scales most importantly in the higher positions not just first position.
    Sure, but if I followed that advice, I'd only know only three cords and one song. Trying to expand my understanding and enjoyment of the instrument.

    Please know I wasn't saying I "mastered" anything. Just wanting to know what would be a good next scale to add to the practice routine on top of the major/minor/and 4ths I'm currently doing.

    Thanks in advance....
    Ukes: Kamaka, Kanilea, Martin, Haiku, Luna, Ko'Aloha

    To My Heroes of WW2: All gave some; some gave all; Nisei solders gave more.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Camsuke View Post
    Thanks! Downloaded.....

    But, the tablature for the scales is much different than expected; for example, p17, D scale - I'm guessing this is a different form of the basic major scale, but it doesn't state it? A bit confusing to a neophyte uke player...
    Last edited by goforbrokeukulele; 10-03-2017 at 11:25 AM.
    Ukes: Kamaka, Kanilea, Martin, Haiku, Luna, Ko'Aloha

    To My Heroes of WW2: All gave some; some gave all; Nisei solders gave more.

  6. #6
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    As a music educator, I think the question is fair—and relevant. We want kids to practice until they can’t get it wrong—and when they do, it is time to add the next challenge. That doesn’t mean that you stop practicing what you know. Michael Jordan probably STILL practices free throws...and he is long retired!

    As I have said before, I have a PhD in music and mainly have studied classsical music. I dipped my toe into guitar education (another story) and was blown away by how so many guitarists know so many scales and modes, not just the major and minor scales.

    The scales do work their way back into music, so, sure, memorizing the fretboard (the whole thing) will need to happen, but that won’t happen overnight.

    Practically, if you have an iPhone, buy Guitar Toolkit, set it to “ukulele” and choose scales. I’m seeing 116 scales available starting on the 3rd String C.
    Playing ukulele since January 2016.

    Have you participated in the thread, "How the Ukulele Found You?" If not, please consider adding your story--they are just fun to read.

    http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/...lele-found-you

  7. #7
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    Learn the major scales "everywhere." All the keys. All the frets. All the strings.

    Pentatonic and other scale types are just distractions until you figure out a way to use them (and even then, most come back to a basic major or minor). I imagine that it's infinitely more useful to know all of your major scales up and down than to know a few major scales in XYZ position, a few pentatonics in XYZ position, a Turkish scale in XYZ position, etc...

    Just my two cents.
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    Quote Originally Posted by goforbrokeukulele View Post
    Thanks! Downloaded.....

    But, the tablature for the scales is much different than expected; for example, p17, D scale - I'm guessing this is a different form of the basic major scale, but it doesn't state it? A bit confusing to a neophyte uke player...
    No, it's a normal D basic major scale. You may have been playing it on different string/fret combinations. There are many possibilities. Check out the campanella fingered one on page 19.

    That looks like an excellent book but I'd ignore the campanella fingered exercises for now at least.

  9. #9

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    Thanks for the additional responses and advice....was initially thinking I had made some sort of mistake asking about scales or asking on the UU forums. I've been "playing" the guitar for almost 2 decades but only chords/strums to accompany singing so really don't consider myself beyond a beginner; I'm attempting to be a whole lot more serious about the uke hence trying to practice scales everyday.

    Growing up playing Suzuki on the piano (memorization) and the French horn in school (1st chair!), I'm fine with reading music but this didn't transfer well to guitar playing which was all chords. I'm now thinking perhaps its music theory I'm actually asking about, but my focus will remain on getting "proficient" with the uke. My level with the guitar is where I know I don't want to be....trying to figure out where to go with the uke.
    Ukes: Kamaka, Kanilea, Martin, Haiku, Luna, Ko'Aloha

    To My Heroes of WW2: All gave some; some gave all; Nisei solders gave more.

  10. #10

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    I don't think anybody's quite answered the question, so here' my thoughts -- after getting very comfortable with the major and minor scales, keep practicing them for sure, but the next scale types to learn are, in my opinion:
    Mixolydian -- same as major but with the 7th degree of the scale a half-step lower: C D E F G A Bb C (for example)
    Blues scale -- take any major scale and use only these notes with these alterations: 1 b3 4 #4(or b5) 5 b7 1 (3 and 7 are flatted in case my typing isn't clear) and #4 can be thought of as the 4th note raised a half-step or the 5th note lowered a half-step, whichever is easier to think of: C Eb F F# G Bb C (for example)
    Whole Tone Scale -- there's a whole step between each pair of notes: C D E F# G# A# C (for example)
    Pentatonic -- same as major scale only leave out notes 4 and 7: C D E G A C (for example)

    Learn those scale types for each key and combined with the majors and minors you'll have a great arsenal for improvising.

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