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Thread: Low G

  1. #1
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    Aug 2017
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    Default Low G

    It seems like a lot of folks use low G on tenors. How does a low G work on a concert?

  2. #2
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    Nov 2009
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    It's a matter of personal preference, but I think it works just fine. In the link in my sig, you can hear me playing a low G Kamaka concert. My low G string of choice is the Fremont Soloist - personally I think non-wound low G sounds awful, and prefer wound strings.

  3. #3
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    Feb 2012
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    I just recently put one on one of my concerts. I'm not sure I'm a fan. For strumming, I would give it a thumbs down overall. Maybe I'm too used to the high G sound but it's not really working for me. It sounds good on some songs but overall I much prefer a high G. I've been trying to learn some finger-picking and I'm going to see how I like it as a picker. I gave it a short try only once so far and it worked better for me as a picker. I just need to spend more time picking with a low G before I make a final decision about how I feel.
    Lanikai LU-21C concert - nato laminate (my starter uke!)
    Ohana CK-42R concert - solid sinker redwood top, solid rosewood back and sides, maple binding
    Kala KA-FMCG concert- solid spruce top, laminate spalted flame maple back and sides, mahogany binding

    Money can't buy happiness but it can buy a ukulele which is basically the same thing.

  4. #4
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    I'll give another vote for the Fremont Soloist, I use them on Soprano, Concert, Tenor & Baritone, coupled with Oasis Fluorcarbon trebles.
    All the best,
    Campbell

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
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    I have a low G on one of my concerts. It suits that uke really well. I've had one on my other concert, and I prefer high G on that one. Anyway, try it and see. It's only a few dollars wasted if you don't like it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
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    Whidbey Island, WA
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    Default

    The PhD low G strings sound great on my KoAloha concert.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikelz777 View Post
    I just recently put one on one of my concerts. I'm not sure I'm a fan. For strumming, I would give it a thumbs down overall. Maybe I'm too used to the high G sound but it's not really working for me. It sounds good on some songs but overall I much prefer a high G. I've been trying to learn some finger-picking and I'm going to see how I like it as a picker. I gave it a short try only once so far and it worked better for me as a picker. I just need to spend more time picking with a low G before I make a final decision about how I feel.
    My opinion.
    The balanced sound of most uke chords in "standard" gCEA tuning is is my opinion because "open" chords don't have any notes in octaves. The C major being an exception, but it sounds ok because the octave note is the root. Any other note doubled as "bass" does not sound good to me. So in general the sound is bright and happy.

    What low G gives is added notes for melody playing that can be really convenient for playing song melodies and also soloing in general. If I did not have a guitar I'd certainly consider getting a low G ukulele.

    Even low G does not add things like alternating bass runs and much depth that the guitar has, so I treat them as different instruments. You still need the 2 lower strings and then it is a Guitalele, a different instrument

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by RafterGirl View Post
    It seems like a lot of folks use low G on tenors. How does a low G work on a concert?
    Very well indeed. My Kala concert is fitted with Aquila "reds" and is my instrument of choice for those tabs written for an instrument with a low G.
    There are those who will wax lyrical about the ability to play a double shuffle with a split fan and a tight G-string ...
    it just makes me walk funny!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2015
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    Sweet Home Osaka Japan
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    Hi, RafterGirl!

    When four four rhythm, we count four like figure 1 below. They are down beats. In ukulele and guitar, we normally play like figure 2, because right hand repeats down and up. In music, no one play down and up on same stress. Basically down is always stronger than up, this is general rule. Otherwise rhythm is broken.



    Low G has an advantage of making this good rhythm same as guitar. Actually it is very good for beginners in terms of rhythm.
    Israel Kamakawiwo'ole played very nice strumming with his low G ukulele. I like his quite effective strumming. It is worth to try in your concert.
    Kamaka HF-1 100

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
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    Upper Hale, Surrey/Hants border, UK.
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    Default

    I've had Low G on my ukes since I started out, couldn't get on with reentrant, being a melody player, it also increases the range of the uke from two to two & a half octaves.

    I had it on soprano too, don't let anyone tell you that it doesn't work, because it does.

    When I started to do sing & strum is the only time that I put a reentrant on any of my ukes.
    Having both, they do sound different strummed, & suit different songs, I believe.
    Trying to do justice to various musical instruments.
    Formerly known as uke1950.

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