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Thread: Uke for a location that isn't climate-controlled

  1. #11
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    If you are really set on taking an all solid wood uke it will be ok with the right treatment. Get a good hard case and keep in it there unless playing it. Put a D'Addario humidipak in the case, its a two way system that will keep the humidity level inside the case at approx 45%. It release moisture when levels are low and absorbs when high. They need replacing every three months or so.
    Ukuleles.............yes please !!!!

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by DownUpDave View Post
    If you are really set on taking an all solid wood uke it will be ok with the right treatment. Get a good hard case and keep in it there unless playing it. Put a D'Addario humidipak in the case, its a two way system that will keep the humidity level inside the case at approx 45%. It release moisture when levels are low and absorbs when high. They need replacing every three months or so.
    I'll second the Humidipaks. I'm a fan of those too. However, how long they last depends.... Just replace it when they dry out whether that is one week or three months. It'd get pretty expensive for someone to have to replace them often. I have heard of that happening in harsh conditions.
    Last edited by jer; 10-11-2017 at 03:23 PM. Reason: Fixed typo.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jer View Post
    I'll second the Humidipaks. I'm a fan of those too. However, how long they last depends.... Just replace it when they dry out whether that is one week or three months. It'd get pretty expensive for someone to have to replace them often. I have hard of that happening in harsh conditions.
    Yes very true. A flea, fluke or all laminate would be much more worry free for sure.
    Ukuleles.............yes please !!!!

  4. #14
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    And I’m not sure when they are coming out, but I would definitely recommend the Orca after owning a prototype for under a week.
    Playing ukulele since January 2016.

    Have you participated in the thread, "How the Ukulele Found You?" If not, please consider adding your story--they are just fun to read.

    http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/...lele-found-you

  5. #15
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    Thanks for all of the replies. So it sounds like either go with a plastic uke (ala Flea, ODU), a laminate that might hold up better, or be willing to take a risk on a higher quality tenor while constantly monitoring humidity levels. I'm still unsure, but we'll see.

  6. #16
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    I second the Blackbird Farallon or Clara. Exceptional instruments, and they don't care about ambient humidity, heat, or much of anything. Can get a used one at a good price... (~$750-850 Clara, $1000-$1150 Farallon)
    _____________________________________________

    Current Uke Stable:

    Soprano:
    Kala travel uke (spruce & mahogany) (KA-SSTU)
    Tenor:
    Romero Creations Tiny Tenor (Spruce & Mahogany)
    Kala Spruce-Ovangkol (KA-ASOV-T)
    Blackbird Farallon (Tobacco Sunburst)

    Beginning uke player with early onset UAS. Just getting started...!

    PM me if you'd like to be in touch...

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by neo1022 View Post
    I second the Blackbird Farallon or Clara. Exceptional instruments, and they don't care about ambient humidity, heat, or much of anything. Can get a used one at a good price... (~$750-850 Clara, $1000-$1150 Farallon)
    Yeah, that's probably out of my price range, but I'll check them out to see what I am missing.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikhou View Post
    Hey there. I have a question for you guys. I've been playing guitar for about 15 years and uke for less than a year. (Being a UU+ member for the last year has really helped me along in learning.) I really enjoy the uke. It's so accessible that you just want to pick it up and play! It's such an intimate little instrument as opposed to my guitar. Anyway, I have been playing an Ohana CK-10 for the last year (a concert-sized uke with solid mahogany top and laminated mahogany back and sides). I really love this little uke. Anyway, I am an American living and working in a 3rd world country in the humanitarian aid sector. Where I live it's cold in the winter and hot and dry in the summer with no climate control indoors. We heat with a woodstove heater, and we cool with fans. So here's the question. I'd like to get a nicer tenor as I'll be back in the States in a few months. But with the plans to come back over here, I am wondering if I should go with something cheaper and laminated for stability, or should I go ahead and get something nicer and take the risk that the lack of climate control could harm it. FYI, I am considering the Pono AT, Pono MGT, Mainland Red Cedar Tenor, or Mainland Mango Tenor. These are all solid wood, but if you think they wouldn't survive the environment, I'd consider going with another Ohana laminate. Thoughts?

    mikhou
    With you being a long term Guitar player I guess that you have picked up skills on the Uke quite quickly and have an ear for the sounds that you are producing. If that’s the case then you’re not a typical second time buyer but still have problems in common with the more experienced players here. As I understand it you are currently playing an all laminated concert Uke that might be fairly described as a good (for) beginners model - https://ohana-music.com/product/ck-10-mahogany-concert/ . As I understand things your Uke is relatively affordable, I believe that some more expensive laminates perform significantly better than the CK10 and so justify their higher price tag.

    The questions that I think you need to be asking are what do you want to achieve musically; are your perceptions of laminate and solid Ukes correct; in what ways does your current Uke not meet your needs; what Calander time span do you actually need to buy for; and in practice how much care would you find restrictive.

    YMMV but to me the answers point away from the expensive solid wood models that you have suggested and towards a better quality laminate that’s built for sound and durability.
    Last edited by Graham Greenbag; 10-12-2017 at 02:43 AM.

  9. #19
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    I will put in my vote for the Fluke or Flea, there's a megthread you can get to from clicking here, with lots of previous discussion on their merits.
    Just the FAQs __________less is more

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graham Greenbag View Post
    With you being a long term Guitar player I guess that you have picked up skills on the Uke quite quickly and have an ear for the sounds that you are producing. If that’s the case then you’re not a typical second time buyer but still have problems in common with the more experienced players here. As I understand it you are currently playing an all laminated concert Uke that might be fairly described as a good (for) beginners model - https://ohana-music.com/product/ck-10-mahogany-concert/ . As I understand things your Uke is relatively affordable, I believe that some more expensive laminates perform significantly better than the CK10 and so justify their higher price tag.

    The questions that I think you need to be asking are what do you want to achieve musically; are your perceptions of laminate and solid Ukes correct; in what ways does your current Uke not meet your needs; what Calander time span do you actually need to buy for; and in practice how much care would you find restrictive.

    YMMV but to me the answers point away from the expensive solid wood models that you have suggested and towards a better quality laminate that’s built for sound and durability.
    I don't disagree with you on your last sentence. What would you expect to pay for a "better quality laminate that's built for sound and durability." Any suggestions?

    Quote Originally Posted by Booli View Post
    I will put in my vote for the Fluke or Flea, there's a megthread you can get to from clicking here, with lots of previous discussion on their merits.
    Thanks for the suggestions, but I just can't seem to get my head around the idea of a Fluke. The body shape just doesn't seem right to me.

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