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Thread: Is a baritone just a lazy man's little guitar?

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by pabrizzer View Post
    So the only proper way to sing is soprano?
    And which saxophone is the 'true' saxophone?
    And the violin? Viola and cellos are just some pale imitators?
    There is a ukulele family! With lots of members.
    Sopranino. Soprano. Concert. Tenor. Baritone. Pineapple. Banjoukulele. 6 string. 8 string. Guitalele.
    Play them. Or talk about them. I know what I prefer......
    Here, here.......you get my vote for President of the World Ukulele Society, very well said. Play them all, love them all, they all have UKULELE in their name
    Last edited by DownUpDave; 10-13-2017 at 12:42 AM.
    Ukuleles.............yes please !!!!

  2. #42
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    The answer is yes or no, it depends. If a guitarist strings a bari linear and just uses it to strum along with a uke group, then yes, it is just a lazy mans little guitar.

    I string my bari reentrant and I actually very rarely strum it. I play fingerpicking/chord melody stuff almost exclusively. I play John King and Rob McKillop stuff and Tony's Beatles instrumentals all the time.

    The reason I have a bari is the same reason I have a tenor recorder - I like a range a little lower and in my mind a little more "richer" in sound that the standard recorder or uke. I think there's room for all of us here under the uke tent!

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jarmo_S View Post
    No zztush, ukulele or guitar are not fourth interval tuned instruments.
    They have an exception between 2nd and 3rd strings, the interval is major 3rd. Other strings are yes tuned fourth apart from each other. Well on uke it would actually need low G for even that.
    Technically, you are correct but it is common practice to refer to this type of tuning as 'fourths tuning'. Viols and Renaissance lutes were also tuned in fourths with a major third in the middle, typically between the third and fourth strings but they are still described as being tuned in fourths.
    Geoff Walker

    I have several ukuleles in various sizes and am not planning on getting any more...

    at least, not yet.

    I also play some blowy things and a squeezy thing

    Internet:
    You Tube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TootlinGeoff
    Soundcloud: http://soundcloud.com/tootlingeoff

  4. #44
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    This is interesting! I have, er ... a couple of baritone ukes, one of which is super-huge (bigger than a tenor guitar), and I have to admit that I am beginning to prefer the DGBE tuning to the traditional soprano tuning. I also have a tenor guitar, tuned DGBE (I couldn't cope with the fifths tuning ... big stretches), so similar to a baritone uke, but with steel strings. And I ALSO have a travel guitar (Baby Taylor) ... I found the nut width on a classical guitar too much for me; and the same applied to the Islander Guitalele I had, with a nut width of 2". I'm still coming to grips with the guitar, as I started from the ukulele end. (Well, to be honest, I'm still coming to grips with playing the uke!) My very big baritone DOES have a more guitar-like sound, so whether that means I'm a "lazy" guitar player, I don't know ... I think I'm a "wannabe" guitar player.
    Last edited by LimousinLil; 10-13-2017 at 02:50 AM.
    Walnut Flea Soprano, Eleuke Peanut, Rob Collins Soprano, Motu, Ukubidon, Gretsch Camp Ukulele, Tenor "Style Manouche", Hora mahogany Baritone, Roger Terry baritone, Sylvain Enjoubaut concert, Outdoor Ukulele (tenor), Ohana Vita, Ohana KA-6 (6-string tenor), DoudsandJo electro-acoustic tenor.

  5. #45
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    Does anyone think of their guitars as gigantic ukuleles with two extra low strings that they use to give them more range to facilitate playing melody?
    I don't want to live in a world that is linear.
    Check out the G&B Detective Series by yours truly.
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/1978485476...ords=r.l.+link

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rllink View Post
    Does anyone think of their guitars as gigantic ukuleles with two extra low strings that they use to give them more range to facilitate playing melody?
    That’s a point. A guitar is a baritone ukulele that you can Travis pick.

  7. #47
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    Well, I never knew a baritone wasn’t a ukulele. My husband plays his in standard Uke tuning cause he has big hands. I play mine in regular baritone tuning cause I want to challenge my aging brain. The same reason why I'll bring my concert also to jams, challenges. Guitar, well, I’ve started lessons. Of the instruments, I find the baritone takes me more effort to get what I want. A guitar has 6 strings so you can find lots of places to find chords. Interesting thread.

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Down Up Dick View Post
    No it doesnít. I donít know what youíre talking about, and I donít think you do either. But never mind-forget it.
    You may not know what he's talking about, but I do and I'm sure that he does as well.

  9. #49
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    Glise de Sherbrooke 1&2.jpg

    Glise de Sherbrooke 3.jpg


    I had two of my 10 year old students, whose lessons came one after another, play a duet for our recital. Ariana is learning guitar and Kyra is learning ukulele. They both learned their parts really well (a fiddle tune called Glise de Sherbrooke), but the guitar seemed to overpower the ukulele. Last Wednesday, I gave Kyra my guitar with the capo on the fifth fret and it sounded great.
    The tabs above are for ukulele, all three parts. The first measure of the B part for ukulele#1 was dropped an octave to make it easier for the kids to play. The asterix shows the proper octave.
    Last edited by Jim Yates; 10-13-2017 at 08:15 AM.

  10. #50
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    Interesting thoughts by Russel Southard of the Ukulele Review. Being the owner of a Rosewood/Cedar Mainland bari, I agree with everything he says here, particularly his comparison of it to a parlor-size guitar, and the intimate music of which it is capable. Serenading a sweetheart, oh yes!

    Despite that comparison, it's still a uke to me.


    http://www.theukulelereview.com/2017...wood-rbshc-pc/


    Cocobolo Pineapple #1
    Ohana Sopranissimo
    Maccaferri Islander
    Harmony Soprano
    D. Heilman ULO #7 Concert
    Mainland Cedar Baritone
    Kala Elite Custom Lebanese Cedar Tenor
    Kanilea K-1 SC
    Bonanza Retro Mint Pear Tenor
    Druid Moon Koa Tenor
    Primrose Cedar/Maple Soprano
    Flea Lava Soprano
    Outdoor Amethyst Soprano
    Cocobolo Cedar Top Tenor
    1933 Martin 1K Soprano

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