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Thread: My advice to beginners is: get 2 ukes. Why? . . . .

  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Salt Lake City, UT
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    636

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    I started out with two - a Kala tenor and an Islander soprano that I bought for my daughter and promptly borrowed. It worked out well for me because the tenor had setup issues and the soprano played great. I doubt I would have been able to progress as far as fast with just the tenor.
    Blackbird Clara
    Concert Flea
    Pono MB
    Deering Goodtime Banjo Uke (concert)
    Hadean Uke-Bass
    Deering Goodtime Special (5-string banjo - currently with 4 strings...)

    Buckle Up

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    199

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rllink View Post
    Me neither. If someone had told me that I needed two ukuleles right off the bat, I would have probably taken up the guitar instead.
    Me too. How many beginners (true beginners, not transitioning classically-trained guitarists) get started on ukulele by reading tab and playing melody? The overwhelming majority of uke players I've met play chords and sing. Try explaining to them the difference between linear and re-entrant tuning and they zone out. It's easy to scare a beginner away and that's a darn shame when it happens.

    Let's not make this more complicated than necessary. Tell beginners to buy a uke and enjoy it. If they decide they need another uke, then they can go ahead and buy it. Not like that ever happens ;-)

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    The U.K.
    Posts
    126

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    Most ukulele players that I know,try Low G and decide it's
    not for them! The re-entrant tuning is what gives the uke
    it's distinctive sound,and that seems to be why people love
    it! Each to their own,of course. I too have tried Low G but
    soon went back to the 'original' uke sound!
    All power and respect to you Concert,Tenor and Baritone players, but Soprano is what does it for me every time!

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    691

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    Two? Why stop there?
    Ask NOT what your country can do for Uke...ask what Uke can do for your country.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    214

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ukecaster View Post
    Two? Why stop there?
    I know. Despite--what?--about three pages of responses, the original post is completely non-controversial and common sensical: there are two tunings and you'll need two ukuleles. I came to the same conclusion within a week of getting my first ukulele. However, upon reflection you realize that you need a ukulele devoted to open G tuning, one devoted to open C to get that banjo sound, one devoted to open E to approach Duane's sound, etc. You need to get creative when approaching the wife with a precis of a request for funds for a new ukulele that has a purpose. For example, I had to throw myself upon the mercy of the court officiated by my wife because I need, absolutely need, a tenor with a 485mm scale--otherwise I cannot play the tonic, the submediant, and subdominant shapes of my minor pentatonic in the same key. I simply need a custom-made long neck tenor with a cutaway!

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    220

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    I started with one soprano Uke, a Solid Spruce Top with laminate back and sides and Mahonany neck. Then bought a second uke some time afterward, another soprano but quite different, actually i think it was a Mahalo LP model.
    I think in hindsight now, i started to make little mods with the LP model, continuing to play both randomly as i felt like it, and also little things like making adjustments to action etc. i think it allowed me to start to understand the dynamics of Ukes at the time, as i was not familiar with them at all previously but had some limited experience with guitars already. Im still learning now, and much more to learn with playing the instrument, thats ongoing always for me, and im still learning more about Ukes, learning is ongoing, but anyway i think having two Ukes at the time is a great foundation for learning about Ukuleles in all regards due to having comparisons and a good basis for early understanding of the instrument.
    People tend to learn differently, have different styles, tastes etc but nonetheless having two Ukes provides a sound foundation. Thats what i think from my own experience.
    Take one of your two Ukes to a Uke Group and enjoy learning to play along with others as well, meet and talk with others and learn bits about playing and get to listen to different sounds and see other people's Ukes also, enjoy it.

    Happy Ukeing
    Last edited by Dean Beaver; 10-22-2017 at 07:55 AM.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Sweet Home Osaka Japan
    Posts
    578

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    My advice is just buy a low G string and swap it whenever you need. I mostly use low G. When I need high G, I just change G string. There is a good and fast way to change string (see the figures below). When we just simply wind the string (X in the top figure), some times it slips. Some times hard to wind, sometimes hard to tune for a while. Especial it is hard for swap strings because they are often shorter. I make a knot (see the bottom figure). This is fast and stable. This technique works even on slotted head classical as well as acoustic guitars.

    Kamaka HF-1 100

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Buffalo, NY
    Posts
    887

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    When I started, I learned on 1 uke, learned all the basics and when I felt comfortable, I ventured out and got more ukes. What I also learned was the more time I spent buying ukes, the less I progressed. I don't want to judge anyone, but I feel a lot of people spend more time buying and looking at their ukes than playing them. If that makes them happy, I'm all for it though. Just not my taste really. I'd rather have 1 uke that I adore and play endlessly than to have 10 ukes I switched between.
    Just Feel The Groooooove

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Upper Hale, Surrey/Hants border, UK.
    Posts
    4,109

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    Actually, it took me 4 ukes to find my right size, I first bought a tenor as was recommended, but it was too much of a stretch, so then got a soprano, which was too cramped, so a concert came along, this felt almost right.

    I then saw a long neck soprano, having a concert scale & small body looked right, it was, & I used that uke for most of the first 6 months of my learning journey.
    Trying to do justice to various musical instruments.
    Formerly known as uke1950.

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