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Thread: Using thumb to fret

  1. #31
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    Sounds nice Jose. I like you other videos on your YouTube channel. Great playing!
    ( o)==::

    Half fast, not half assed

  2. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Maguwa View Post
    Sounds nice Jose. I like you other videos on your YouTube channel. Great playing!
    Thanks dude

  3. #33
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    Hi, Lapyang! You don't need to feel guilty to use thumb to fret.

    These are 4 important movable chords on ukulele.



    People use thumbs for these chords.

    Kamaka HF-1 100

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by gitarzan View Post
    Nothing to fret over


    Quote Originally Posted by ripock View Post
    One thing to mention in this regard is that a player shouldn't use the thumb out of necessity. While I have been attaining proficiency with the instrument I have been frustrated and I did some silly things to be able to play E major, C# major, and the B major chords. In each case, once I practiced more and more it became unnecessary to do these things and doing these things did nothing but delay my progress. So, as a novice player myself, I would say practice more and innovate less; there's a reason standard fingerings are standard. That being said, I see nothing wrong with using the thumb if it is merely a choice and if it speeds up the transitioning. However, in this case, I don't see the benefit. There is a lot of wasted motion going on, whereas with the standard fingerings, all you need to do is move one finger without changing the position of the palm and wrist.
    I agree with riprock. Once you acquire a certain level of skill I think you will find that fretting with your thumb is not the best way to do it.

    That being said, do whatever works for you. No two people are the same and part of the process is discovering what movements and positions you can use to your advantage. There are many ways to play and there is no one correct technique. If you can swing the 4th string thumb-fret maneuver and you are comfortable with it, no one is going to stop you from using it.

  5. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill1 View Post
    I am not sure of the tuning of the Cuatro in the video. I am sure it has varied tunings. The wikipedia indicates that one of its tunings is what ukulele players call D tuning, ADF#B. So if the instrument in the video is in D tuning, any ukulele player can copy the shapes and play this piece on a ukulele, using your thumb to fret as shown in the video.
    That's correct! ADF#B is by far the most widespread tuning, so it's straightforward to adapt this technique.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by zztush View Post
    Hi, Lapyang!

    I think your Em and Am are like these below.



    In similar case, thumb for Am is natural.
    If you have to use your thumb for those chords then you are truly doomed when it comes to really hard chords.

    -- Gary

  7. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sculptor View Post
    If you have to use your thumb for those chords then you are truly doomed when it comes to really hard chords.

    -- Gary
    You might try explaining that to Jorge Glem

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by José de Londres View Post
    You might try explaining that to Jorge Glem
    With Jorge Glem and Jake, possibly the two top "Ukulele" players extant both using their thumbs, you certainly don't want to dismiss this technique, even if it doesn't suit you personally. But I'd emphasize two things in this discussion.

    First, even if you prefer not to thumb fret, muting the 4th string can be very useful in some pieces; it's generally easier to do with your thumb.

    Second, ZZ refers to the Standing Position. Obviously it's easier to use your thumb when you also have a strap, as is customary when standing. But strap use isn't confined to the Standing Position. From "Early Romantic Guitar":

    Nearly every period guitar came with a strap button. In the early 19th century, classical guitarists often played using a strap. A period portrait of Giuliani depicts Giuliani playing the guitar standing up and wearing a strap; ...(but) the strap was also worn to help hold the guitar body in position, even while sitting.

    We've always put a strap button on our instruments, in large part to make it easier for those who like to use their thumbs.
    Last edited by southcoastukes; 11-05-2017 at 04:10 PM.
    Dirk Wormhoudt



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  9. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by southcoastukes View Post
    With Jorge Glem and Jake, possibly the two top "Ukulele" players extant both using their thumbs, you certainly don't want to dismiss this technique, even if it doesn't suit you personally. But I'd emphasize two things in this discussion.

    First, even if you prefer not to thumb fret, muting the 4th string can be very useful in some pieces; it's generally easier to do with your thumb.

    Second, ZZ refers to the Standing Position. Obviously it's easier to use your thumb when you also have a strap, as is customary when standing. But strap use isn't confined to the Standing Position. From "Early Romantic Guitar":

    Nearly every period guitar came with a strap button. In the early 19th century, classical guitarists often played using a strap. A period portrait of Giuliani depicts Giuliani playing the guitar standing up and wearing a strap; ...(but) the strap was also worn to help hold the guitar body in position, even while sitting.

    We've always put a strap button on our instruments, in large part to make it easier for those who like to use their thumbs.
    In the case of Glem it's a bit different though. It isn't that he's getting away with using the thumb because he's a technical wizard. The use of the thumb is an established and accepted technique in the cuatro repertoire. It's the norm when it comes to the cuatro, which interestingly is an instrument traditionally played strapless.

  10. #40
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    Hi, Lapyang!

    Michael Jackson's multi-millionaire model daughter Paris plays Am like us on her ukulele.



    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz...ng-France.html
    Kamaka HF-1 100

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