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Thread: Baritone Soundboard - Repair/Replace

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Queanbeyan, NSW Australia.
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    1,514

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    Quote Originally Posted by ash13brook View Post
    I was trying to give an idea of the bow in the neck and nut height. But, I see that really doesn't say much. I'll lower the nut slots to about where I want them, then take care of the saddle. If the nut still needs some tweaking, I'll finish it then.
    What about stripping the finish? any advice there?
    Do you think I would be better off with a flat sound board, intonation-wise? I have no qualms about trying to replace the top as a learning experience.

    Thanks,
    Matt
    I'm all about measuring so measure the intonation and see where its at now. Assuming you have a clip on headstock tuner or another suitable tuner get the instrument in tune and then gradually fret up the neck and see what the intonation does. That's the first step and it could conceivably be flat or sharp.

    The next step is to use a rule and measure up the instrument but lets just start with what a tuner tells you about the intonation.

    I have no experience in stripping/refinishing an instrument.

  2. #12

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    I'll do some checking of the intonation in the next couple of days and get back.
    Y'all can forget the refinishing question. I read a little about it and it ain't for me.

    Thanks,
    Matt

  3. #13

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    The intonation goes sharp at the first fret on all strings.
    I'm using a Snark tuner. They go sharp about a "line" and a half at the first to a little over two at the highest. Not a full half-tone, though.

    Matt

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Queanbeyan, NSW Australia.
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    OK, that's going quite a bit sharp, which is unfortunately "normal" these days but we needed to know for sure before we started. The saddle rotating forwards probably contributed to this sharpness but its not responsible for all of that. The intonation going sharp from the first fret indicates that the nut could be misplaced as well. The thing to note here is that even if you put in the work to raise up the saddle to correct the forwards rotation you still wouldn't have corrected all the sharp intonation.

    Do you know what the scale length on the instrument is , supposed to be?

    You are going to have to measure from scratch anyway. The zero/zero point when measuring the scale length/intonation is the centre of the 12th fret at its highest point where it comes into contact with the strings.

    The formula for actual scale length is nominal scale length + saddle compensation or more accurately the distance from inside nut to centre of the 12th fret x 2 + saddle compensation. If the instrument is going sharp the first culprit is a lack of saddle compensation yet on your instrument I suspect that the nut is also placed further away from the centre of the 12 fret than it should be.

    OK, Measure from the inside nut to inside the saddle to get a ball park figure for the scale length. A fraction more than a "roundish" figure is what we are looking for with the "roundish" figure being the nominal scale length and the fraction more being the saddle compensation. The roundish number could be 19", 20", 20 1/4", 20 1/2" or even 21". It could also conceivably be in metric. The distance from the centre of the 12th fret to inside the nut should be precisely half of the "round" number.

    Start measuring the instrument and see what you get.

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