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Thread: Low G compensated saddle

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2015
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    Sweet Home Osaka Japan
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    Question Low G compensated saddle

    Do you have low G compensated saddle (blue line on the bottom figure)?

    A friend of mine has a soprano high G. He wants to change his uku Log G. His uku has a high G compensation (green line on the figure below). We are going to change it just straight saddle (without any compensation). I know there are many log G players here. We are just wondering if anyone has a low G compensated saddle.

    Kamaka HF-1 100

  2. #2
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    Upper Hale, Surrey/Hants border, UK.
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    Most of my ukes have low G - & I've never needed to do anything other than change strings.
    Trying to do justice to various musical instruments.
    Formerly known as uke1950.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    That's an interesting question and one I've never given any thought to! My most recent Kamaka that I play low G has a compensated saddle. I've never felt the need to change it - I have an older Kamaka also strung low G, that has a straight saddle, and my ears cannot detect any differences, good or bad, caused by the saddle.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Pickering, ON, Canada
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    Same here. I have many tenors in low G, some with compensated saddles some without and they all sound fine. It might be just luck but no intonation issues with any of them. A saddle that is ompensation for a certain string might not be correct for another brand that is a different material, diameter and tension.
    Ukuleles.............yes please !!!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Honoka'a, HI
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    IMO, for the average Joe, your fretting fingers are going to negatively adjust the intonation just as much as a compensated or straight saddle might "fix" it. So why bother?

    Intonation on an 'ukulele is pretty much a stab in the dark anyways. I've played some pretty nice ukes. I don't recall any that had a compensated saddle. If they did, I certainly did not think, "Wow! This plays so much more in tune than every other uke I've ever played!"
    Peace,

    Brad Bordessa
    Webmaster of Live 'Ukulele.com
    Admin for The Ukulele Way


    My original folk rock album, If Only, is available now!
    'Ukulele Chord Shapes - 55 pages of all the chords and know-how you'll ever need to stay found on the fretboard.

  6. #6
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    Mar 2015
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    USA
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    I hope you try it with the saddle as-is to begin with. If you replace: I would just go straight saddle too if it were mine. The more I mess around with compensated saddles, especially on sopranos, I just don't think they make enough difference to bother with. There are plenty of ukes out there with straight saddles and great intonation. Think of the Flukes and Fleas for example.
    I agree that strings used, and the way you play are huge factors too. Of course the height of the saddle comes into play as well.
    You probably already know this, but just in case: Make sure the nut slot is wide enough so your new low G string doesn't bind in it and cause tuning stability issues.
    Last edited by jer; 11-09-2017 at 06:56 AM.

  7. #7
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    May 2015
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    Richmond, California
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    Quote Originally Posted by jer View Post
    I hope you try it with the saddle as-is to begin with. If you replace: I would just go straight saddle too if it were mine. The more I mess around with compensated saddles, especially on sopranos, I just don't think they make enough difference to bother with. There are plenty of ukes out there with straight saddles and great intonation. Think of the Flukes and Fleas for example.
    I agree that strings used, and the way you play are huge factors too. Of course the height of the saddle comes into play as well.
    You probably already know this, but just in case: Make sure the nut slot is wide enough so your new low G string doesn't bind in it and cause tuning stability issues.
    Yup, everything jer said!
    Robert Edney
    Robert@ElixirViolins.com

    Much more interested in playing the ukulele than making violins just now...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2015
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    Sweet Home Osaka Japan
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    Thank you folks! We've decided no to change the saddle. We use this high G compensated saddle for low G. We name it Jimi Hendrix saddle. Thank you Dave!

    Kamaka HF-1 100

  9. #9

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    Btw the Stratocaster looks kind of cooler the Jimi's way

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jarmo_S View Post
    Btw the Stratocaster looks kind of cooler the Jimi's way
    Btw we are same age, and we enjoyed this soap opera.

    Last edited by zztush; 11-10-2017 at 04:40 AM.
    Kamaka HF-1 100

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