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Thread: Most difficult basic chord

  1. #21
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    Have you tried a tenor ukulele? More space to fit your fingers.

  2. #22
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    Sep 2017
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    So far for me it's Bb but I haven't gotten to any Es yet. Nice to know I have something to look forward to?

  3. #23
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    If you are having trouble playing Bb, it would be worth considering whether the string heights on your uke need to be adjusted at the nut. Press each string down to the fret board at the third fret (individually). Ideally, that string should just about touch the top of the first fret. High strings make it much harder to hold down difficult shapes close to the nut.

    This is only a quick rule of thumb, but can be useful in deciding whether a set-up might help.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eljay View Post
    So far for me it's Bb but I haven't gotten to any Es yet. Nice to know I have something to look forward to?
    Keep practicing the Bb. Once you nail it, move the shape to the 7th fret and you're playing E!

    Or, like me, you can just play the 1X02 E chord which, despite what was said earlier in this thread, works equally fine with linear and re-entrant tunings. Playing the blues in E with something like a 1402 E chord is a nightmare. With the 1X02 it becomes the easiest key to play.

  5. #25

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    I'm glad it works also in low-G. I did not check it in my guitar or any. You will have low A and even B chords with your stringing ripock.
    Myself I was never much into blues. Closest I came was with my electric guitar, some solos with that.

    Closest also is Bonnie Raitt and her beautiful slide solos, though I always have liked more her singing with other genres than blues

  6. #26
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    I understand and, to be honest, I almost never play the blues. I essentially just use the progression with a new rhythm and strum pattern to create my own tunes. This is a topic for another thread but I actually think the blues, like Christmas songs, are an obsolescent art-form which sounds good in the proper historical context but sounds a bit silly when modern people try to create something in the genre.

  7. #27
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    For me, it is the G#7 chord. My little finger does not want to go where I want it to go.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by zhwen View Post
    For me, it is the G#7 chord. My little finger does not want to go where I want it to go.
    I practise familiar chord sequences as a brain teaser and to get to know many keys, from 4b to 4# keys. So I encounter it in E and related C#minor key.
    Like a minor sequence
    C#m: 1104
    F#m: 2120
    G#7: 1323 (this is G7 shape moved up one fret). I myself don't find it difficult at all because little finger has an easy reach, but everyones fingers are different

    What I find difficult is G#: 1343
    So difficult I usually play the weaker 5343. Weaker because G# is played on 4th fret instead 1st.
    This same chord is used also in Eb and Ab flat keys as Ab.
    Last edited by Jarmo_S; 11-13-2017 at 12:45 AM.

  9. #29
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    We need to identify basic chords first.

    Fist of all, we need to identify basic keys. My basic keys are only C and G. But I think many people think basic keys are F, C, G D and A (red circle in the figure below). Their diatonic chords are within green circle below. E is used by dominant instead of tonic, hence we don't count E as basic chord. We count E7 as basic chord (blue in the figure below) instead.



    The only difficult chords come up in this thread are Bb Dm and G (yeliow circles).
    Kamaka HF-1 100

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by zztush View Post
    We need to identify basic chords first.

    Fist of all, we need to identify basic keys. My basic keys are only C and G. But I think many people think basic keys are F, C, G D and A (red circle in the figure below). Their diatonic chords are within green circle below. E is used by dominant instead of tonic, hence we don't count E as basic chord. We count E7 as basic chord (blue in the figure below) instead.



    The only difficult chords come up in this thread are Bb Dm and G (yeliow circles).
    I would definately include also Bb and its related G minor key as basic. Quite easy chords.

    What I am not still quite happy is with F#7 in B minor key related to D major key. There are various fingerings. F# is easy in my opinion and there to go to 3421 that omits the fifth sound nice F#7. Anyways I just need to practice. That key is so common.

    Nice that you did put the Circle of Fifths picture in your post. It is such a powerful tool. As an example C and A minor keys. The chords can be found so easy. There is all chords of C: C, G, F and Dm, Am Em shown at a narrow sector. This facilitates easy transposing to other keys.
    In A minor tunes the Em can and most often is replaced with E(7).
    Last edited by Jarmo_S; 11-13-2017 at 02:17 AM.

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