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Thread: Is it really fishing line?

  1. #11
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    After doing my homework reading on the subject, I bought bulk Seaguar Premier leader in two gauges, each to replace the 3rd string on my fifths tuned ukes, a tenor in CGDA and baritone in GDAE. I had previously installed Thomastik classical flatwounds, which I still use on both instruments for the 4th string. To this lifelong musician's ears, the Seaguar sounds extremely good - full sound, ample sustain, and intonation is right there. I can't speak for any other fishing line or brands. This is Seaguar's most expensive product. The main reason I chose to try it was to reduce finger noise. (Yes, even with Thomastiks, I could hear it - I just have noisy fingers, I guess!) For that reason I prefer an unwound third string, and this turned out to be just the ideal substitution I had hoped for in every way.

    (If string makers aren't using Seaguar leader, one wonders by what strange coincidence certain companies have fluoro strings with identical gauges to theirs. Hmmmm.... )

    bratsche
    A bunch of stringed instruments tuned in fifths. And a bunch of cats!


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  2. #12
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    @MOPman, why do you say this so definitively? I’m curious on what basis you’re so sure since the topic has remained a bit of mystery for many.

    My understanding is there are only a handful of factories that make fluorocarbon line. They make all the fishing line, all the flouro instruments strings, etc. there is no other source.

    I happen to know several people who use large spools of fishing line, selecting different gauges for each string. And this is worth a read for those interested:

    http://www.gotaukulele.com/2015/05/s...ulele.html?m=1
    Last edited by Ukulele Eddie; 11-11-2017 at 08:20 AM.
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  3. #13
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    I have been using fishing line (leader) at different levels since 2010. Here is my take on it...

    Seaguar is owned by Kuhera. Kuhera was the first producer of fluorocarbon classical guitar strings for Savarez.

    Over the years I have used about a half-a-dozen manufacturers and fishing line levels. There are definitely differences between fishing line manufacturers and within their offerings. I have no doubt that there are formulary differences in the manufacture of fishing line. Therefore, it stands to reason that there will be differences between some (all???) fishing line and ukulele strings.

    While not privy to manufacturing cost and run size, I would imagine a company would need to run a substantial amount of ukulele strings to develop totally unique formulas. But that may not hold true.

    Bad fishing line usually make poor strings. They all work, but there are significant differences in sound and intonation. Intonation is driven by string/fishing line consistency.

    Today I use only 2 sizes of Seaguar fishing leader to replace either the C string or the A string; and only if a slightly thinner string sounds/balances out better. I only use Seaguar Premier because it is IFGA rated for tournaments so it is made to closer tolerances and is higher quality. It makes an excellent string, but I wouldn't recommend stocking up on a bunch if sizes. But for me it is cheaper than buying a set of ukulele strings just for an A or a C.

    John
    Last edited by 70sSanO; 11-11-2017 at 08:39 AM.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by MopMan View Post
    Totally, completely, and in all other ways FALSE. There are a hundred different kinds of fluorocarbon strings, none of which are fishing line.


    I have heard that some people have tried using actual fishing line... seems silly to me...

    Edit: It seems my statement above may be incorrect. It seems some fluorocarbon strings might in fact be indistinguishable from fishing line. Either way, I wouldn't let that fact deter you from using fluorocarbons.
    Not to burst any bubbles, but the common wisdom of the Hive Mind of both the uke-world and classical guitar realm will take you to task for an authoritative source for the original statement.

    I'd suggest that you to learn from the experience of others here in this community on UU if you wish to enhance your ukulele experience.

    Oasis Strings started their fluoro strings lines with assistance of master artisan luthier Chuck Moore, and have openly admitted to using fluoro fishing leader as the source of the strings, and there are threads here on UU that show the beta-testing and discussions of the entire process. You can find those threads by searching the forum.

    Oasis Strings are loved by MANY here in the uke community, and really are just fluoro fishing leader, cut from spools to 63" lengths for two sets in the pack and labeled as 'ukulele strings' or other lengths and sold as 'classical guitar strings' in their GPX-named products.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ukulele Eddie View Post
    @MOPman, why do you say this so definitively? I’m curious on what basis you’re so sure since the topic has remained a bit of mystery for many.

    My understanding is there are only a handful of factories that make fluorocarbon line. They make all the fishing line, all the flouro instruments strings, etc. there is no other source.

    I happen to know several people who use large spools of fishing line, selecting different gauges for each string. And this is worth a read for those interested:

    http://www.gotaukulele.com/2015/05/s...ulele.html?m=1
    I agree with you here, and thanks for posting this so I don't have to.

    After personally testing over 100 different sets of strings, including fluorocarbons from many many string makers, I can confirm that while all the strings labeled as 'fluorocarbon', some are different, and not just in color, gauge, feel or tension.

    Some products like Fremont Blacklines, or Worth Browns are colored differently, but also FEEL and SOUND different than the clear strings of the same gauges by the same maker.

    -

    Is it all snake oil? I don't know, as I am not a chemist, nor care to split hairs, but I know that not all fluoro strings will play the same (not talking about gauges/diameters), and having tried Seaguars fluoro fishing leader myself in sets given to me that are the same gauges as the Worth CT strings, I could not tell any difference between the Seaguars and Worths on the ukes I tested them on.

    YMMV
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  5. #15
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    I once proposed this on the Marketplace BB and was accused of fishing for gullibles.
    So here goes again. I've wondered if using hollow core, constant diameter fly fishing line for all four strings and filling the 3 descending strings with increasing density material to produce the proper notes with almost the same tension on each string.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by spongeuke View Post
    I once proposed this on the Marketplace BB and was accused of fishing for gullibles.
    So here goes again. I've wondered if using hollow core, constant diameter fly fishing line for all four strings and filling the 3 descending strings with increasing density material to produce the proper notes with almost the same tension on each string.
    Isn't this something like what Dirk over at Southcoast attempts? Uses a variety of materials to get strings of similar gauges and tensions with different densities in order to produce sets that feel consistent across all four strings for good, predictable response when playing? I've never used his strings so I can't say for sure, but I'm sure I read it on their site - that they aim for consistent tension across the set and gauge where possible.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by jer View Post
    When you mention titanium strings up there, I'm guessing you're talking about the D'addario Titanium strings. Those are not fluorocarbon. They are monofilament.
    "Monofilament" just means it is a single extruded piece of plastic - not woven or spun or wound. So D'Addario Titanium strings may not be fluorocarbon, but calling them monofilament doesn't prove anything.

  8. #18

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    Fluorocarbon strings = fishing line...Fake news!!!
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  9. #19
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    Well said, Bill.
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  10. #20
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    Just think, in an inverse scenario. snobby fishermen who own the best gear and fish from the priciest yachts might be on their forums discussing the provenance of their specially engineered, top-of-the-line competition grade leader in similar terms:

    "From a factory that makes ukulele strings, you say? What slanderous, blasphemous twaddle!"

    bratsche
    A bunch of stringed instruments tuned in fifths. And a bunch of cats!


    "There are two refuges from the miseries of life: music and cats." - Albert Schweitzer

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