Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Another Neighbor Luthier

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Little River, California
    Posts
    1,571

    Default Another Neighbor Luthier

    Another of my neighbors just up the road who is a luthier: James Goodall of Fort Bragg. Check out this video. It about guitar building of coarse and not ukuleles but has a few tips and little ideas for you builders out there. Check out the shop. Looks more like an operating theater than a shop. Beautiful.

    Note: This is a very long video so get a cuppa or a glass of beer before watching. Hint: A few secrets revealed so pay attention...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gS78...ature=youtu.be

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Cumbria, NW England
    Posts
    375

    Default

    This must be one of the best videos on acoustic guitar making. Virtually every process is shown, there's much use of machine tools and jigs but also a lot of hand work. The attention to detail is what hit me most. I was intrigued by the short session on voicing the soundboard and thought the way he binds was interesting. I spend a lot of time finishing necks by hand so it good to see the effort here too (albeit using a power tool). The finished guitar looked fantastic.

    I watch a lot of Youtube on instrument making and this is certainly worth watching for both beginners and those who have already made a few instruments

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    178

    Default

    This video is making the luthier forum sites and even experienced builders are taking things away. I did not jot down things I want to use, I'll have to go through it again. Oh whoa is me.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Little River, California
    Posts
    1,571

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by greenscoe View Post
    I was intrigued by the short session on voicing the soundboard
    Yes I thought this was interesting too... Different. I can vouch for the result because the tops sound great.... The part about the thicker reinforced sides adding base notes was also something to think about. Not sure I buy it, but what the hell do I know. Great video.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Wales, UK
    Posts
    4,702

    Default

    Priceless comment from a man who knows who he is and what he is about, "We don't use hide glue..." and then goes on to say why they use TiteBond. Now I am pretty sure that if I had made this statement ont his forum I would have been shot down in flames

    James is refering to th extensive work done in the classical guitar field stiffening sides to the point of laminating them. I don't know if it works but that is the reference point and I am sure that video with O'Brian and the Austarlian guru of double tops will have something about it in the interview.

    Great jigs and tools and the Goodall workshop. I wanted to see the electric hand plane at work trimming cross banding on the centre seam - this guy has reall worked everything out.

    Interesting point - outsourcing the finishing. Many luthiers do this and it makes sense. It is a completely different branch of the business that most of us struggle to get satisfactory results at.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Herts, UK
    Posts
    152

    Default

    I thought it interesting that he splashed a liberal helping of CA glue all around the sound hole area before routing the rosette. So much for being careful using CA on spruce tops.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    178

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Andyk View Post
    I thought it interesting that he splashed a liberal helping of CA glue all around the sound hole area before routing the rosette. So much for being careful using CA on spruce tops.
    Yeah, I noted that also.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Little River, California
    Posts
    1,571

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Andyk View Post
    I thought it interesting that he splashed a liberal helping of CA glue all around the sound hole area before routing the rosette. So much for being careful using CA on spruce tops.
    Yes, of everything on the video that made me wince it was that. I've had some very unpleasant results with CA glue running up the grain and always liberally seal with shellac before getting near a spruce or redwood top with CA. Evidently it works for them though. I think this is because CA won't run on you unless it gets on the endgrain and runs. Flat on the top really seals and probably gives a helleva nice tight cut with no danger of tear out. Still, I'm gonna stick with 2 coats of shellac. Hey whatever works...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Wales, UK
    Posts
    4,702

    Default

    Other things of note - he does not refer to his son or himself as a 'luthier'. I thought that was interesting. He has a jig for practically everything but knows when to use hand tools. All actions are measured and deliberate. His workshop is ordered... essential when you share that space with someone else. His thoughts on top tension; were really interesting. 50' radius for a guitar front is so minimal and the complete opposite as a front building idea to me and my ukulel fornts. His explanation for this explains a lot about my sound.... Furthermore - "I didn't want to reproduce the Martin sound..." High 5 buddy - it is truly overated and over enthusiastically promoted by those who know of nothing else. I'm just glad we don't have the same problem making ukulele... I mean, what is the 'benchmark' sound? I'll be darned if I know or would even dare to put a name on it.

    BTW - superglue only 'wicks' up end grain so you are totaly safe smearing on the front if it is spruce. If you use fly cutters you get very little furring. Now I use CNC technology I'm going to try the superglue trick...
    Last edited by Pete Howlett; 11-15-2017 at 03:59 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Little River, California
    Posts
    1,571

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Howlett View Post
    BTW - superglue only 'wicks' up end grain so you are totaly safe smearing on the front if it is spruce. If you use fly cutters you get very little furring. Now I use CNC technology I'm going to try the superglue trick...
    Final thought on the CA glue fill: I am pretty sure they used SMD 20 instead of the watery 10 weight. The 20 weight doesn't wick like the 10 does. Neat trick. Would work on binding channels too. I would let it cure for a day though. Could gum up the works if you hit it too early. Me, I'm going to stick with 1lb shellac. The thought of staining the top gives me pause.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •