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Thread: String a uke at headstock

  1. #1
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    Default String a uke at headstock

    I see some ukes strung like this pic, with G and C wound on outside of the posts, presumably to allow turning the pegs in a certain direction. Any technical pros/cons there, or is it just personal preferece?

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  2. #2
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    Right, this is to get all the pegs tuning in the same direction. Personally, I string the upper left and lower right strings the opposite way to minimize the string angle from the nut and reduce interference with the other strings. But I admit I never know whether to turn left or right to pitch up or down. . ;-)
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Hanks View Post
    Right, this is to get all the pegs tuning in the same direction...
    I also think that this is why someone would do it that way.

    Geared tuners (like on guitar) all turn the same direction because there are different pairs for left side and right side the way that the worm gear on the button shaft connects to the gear wheel that is attached to the string post.

    I've also seen friction tuners where the G and A strings wrap around from the 'outside', but dont recall the reasoning behind that.

    Regardless of tuner type, I've always strung my ukes such that the strings wrap around the posts from the 'inside', mirroring the E and A strings in the photo you included, like this:

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  4. #4
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    Mine are as Booli's picture - turn them anti clockwise to tune up, clockwise to tune down.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Croaky Keith View Post
    Mine are as Booli's picture - turn them anti clockwise to tune up, clockwise to tune down.
    It's not actually my own picture nor of a uke I own - that photo is linked from http://www.get-tuned.com/how-to-string-a-ukulele.php, which was easier than taking a photo myself and uploading it when there are millions of 'ukulele headstock' photos available via an image search.
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  6. #6
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    I've heard of stringing the G and A strings going outside instead of in to give a straighter path to the tuning post. I'm not sure that it actually helps tuning stability like some claim...maybe. I do know of cases with some instruments, like some cigar box guitars, that it does help by simply keeping the strings spaced apart more on an otherwise cramped headstock.

    That said, I think doing it the way it is in the pic you posted just doesn't make sense. It looks like the C string is rubbing against the post of the G string's tuner. Other than that, it just looks wrong to me. I string up the traditional way. All strings go to the inside, like in the pic Booli posted.

  7. #7
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    My soprano ukulele came strung with G and A on the outside, and C and E on the inside. It recently went to the shop for a repair, and when I got it back they were all strung on the inside.
    I kind of liked the original way as the strings were straighter through the nut (but I always do end up turning it the wrong way at first).
    I think this way of stringing must be unique to friction tuners, as I've never seen non-friction tuners done this way.
    Last edited by sbanacho; 12-09-2017 at 05:39 PM. Reason: corrected strings and directions

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