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Thread: "Vintage" -- fancy name for old & low-tech?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichM View Post
    That's funny-- I also collect fountain pens and was going to use that exact example. Small world!
    LOL! Fountain pens are so nice.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rllink View Post
    I don't accept the proposition that stuff was made better in the old days. I'm old, and I have friends who like to get in their way-back-machine and talk about how good things were back in the day, and that can be everything from kids to cars, and if they played ukuleles they would say that they just don't make them like that anymore, but I don't buy that way of thinking.
    Some things were made better, I think. Not machines, necessarily, but there was more of a sense that things need to be durable. Clothes, for example. But I don’t think that applies to everything.

    My fountain pen example is of something that was made in a different way that’s not done any more, and to some they are better old. Ukes were made of better materials early on, but I think overall construction is better today. They made them with a particular l sound in mind, not so much sustain, etc. So they’re different. “Better” is strictly one’s opinion.
    Laura

    Haʻina ʻia mai ana ka puana

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by raffrox View Post
    I bought the uke before seeing your post so I'll see how I go. It has no cracks and one small scratch apparently. It's a player according to the seller but see how we go. Thanks again!
    Hope it's a good 'un! One scratch in 80-100 years is pretty good going.

    You will be surprised by how (comparatively) loud it is, and also that it weighs nothing in your hands. I wouldn't part with mine.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rllink View Post
    I don't accept the proposition that stuff was made better in the old days. I'm old, and I have friends who like to get in their way-back-machine and talk about how good things were back in the day, and that can be everything from kids to cars, and if they played ukuleles they would say that they just don't make them like that anymore, but I don't buy that way of thinking.
    My answer would be that it all depends on what it is. Some products were made to last and be durable. It was not unheard of for someone to have a Maytag washer that would last 40 years. I doubt today's appliances would last a quarter of that. Some products today have the advantage of computer aided design and manufacture which in some cases has meant better quality control.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by ProfChris View Post
    Hope it's a good 'un! One scratch in 80-100 years is pretty good going.

    You will be surprised by how (comparatively) loud it is, and also that it weighs nothing in your hands. I wouldn't part with mine.
    So my Kumalae arrived today. Really happy with it. No cracks or major anything wrong. The scratch is pretty minor. No label in the sound hole and one not original tuning peg but otherwise a really nice uke.

    Like your said ProfChris it's amazingly light for its volume and projection. I'm still getting my head around wooden friction tuning pegs as far as precise tuning goes but it sounds great so far

  5. #25
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    Mine has wooden pegs too, and they're rather vague - this because they (or the holes) have changed shape with age.

    A violin repair shop could fix this very easily, as they have the reamers and peg shapers needed. Once fitted, wooden pegs work well.

    I really should sort mine out, but because I have a reamer I could (in theory) make a peg shapers, and so it's all waiting on my doing that. Maybe this year

    Any pics yet? Glad you're happy with it, like I said, mine's a definite keeper.

  6. #26
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    20180103_192948.jpg

    Here's a pic. I'm quite happy with the figuring on the sound board. That's a good idea as far as taking it to a violin repair shop. There's a very fancy looking one that I went past the other day. I'm a bit worried about what the cost might be from a place like that but no doubt they would do a great job. Although i think I'd consider having a go at it myself as well I've been having a dabble making a cigar box uke and I think wooden pegs would suit pretty well so I'm keen to learn more.

    I'd be keen to hear how you go if you do give it a try to change your wooden pegs. Cheers ProfChris!

  7. #27
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    A great looking instrument. Enjoy.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by raffrox View Post
    20180103_192948.jpg

    Here's a pic. I'm quite happy with the figuring on the sound board. That's a good idea as far as taking it to a violin repair shop. There's a very fancy looking one that I went past the other day. I'm a bit worried about what the cost might be from a place like that but no doubt they would do a great job. Although i think I'd consider having a go at it myself as well I've been having a dabble making a cigar box uke and I think wooden pegs would suit pretty well so I'm keen to learn more.

    I'd be keen to hear how you go if you do give it a try to change your wooden pegs. Cheers ProfChris!
    Very nice indeed! You have a Style C, there should be a pencilled serial number inside ending in c.

    Ask the violin shop how much - it should only take 30 mins or so to refit the pegs. To do it yourself you need a 30:1 taper reamer and a peg shaper, which will cost USD 60-200 depending where you buy them, so it's not an easy job at home. You can get close by glueing sandpaper to a peg (maybe the next size down), but not close enough to get them working above "acceptable".

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by pritch View Post
    A great looking instrument. Enjoy.
    Cheers

    Quote Originally Posted by ProfChris View Post
    Very nice indeed! You have a Style C, there should be a pencilled serial number inside ending in c.

    Ask the violin shop how much - it should only take 30 mins or so to refit the pegs. To do it yourself you need a 30:1 taper reamer and a peg shaper, which will cost USD 60-200 depending where you buy them, so it's not an easy job at home. You can get close by glueing sandpaper to a peg (maybe the next size down), but not close enough to get them working above "acceptable".
    Sounds like I'm getting the violin shop to do it!! Happy to if it keeps it going for the foreseeable future. I think it will make quite a difference getting it done propoerly as the non-original peg losens after 20 min or so, so its currently pretty tough to keep it in tune but when it is it sings! The action is pretty high compared to my other ukes but I can live with it.

    You're right about the serial number. Cheers for that. A style C it is. I didn't realise the serial number was there until I looked for it

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by EDW View Post
    My answer would be that it all depends on what it is. Some products were made to last and be durable. It was not unheard of for someone to have a Maytag washer that would last 40 years. I doubt today's appliances would last a quarter of that. Some products today have the advantage of computer aided design and manufacture which in some cases has meant better quality control.
    I inherited my mother's sewing machine; and while I'm not into sewing like she was, it has worked for me every time I've had to use it, and I've only replaced a belt. It's over 65 years old.

    We have a refrigerator that was in our house when we moved here (1999) that was already old then, and it's still running, despite having outlived a couple of newer models. (We need at least two working ones here.) We were recently told by several technicians that nowadays, if a fridge is 6+ years old, it's cheaper to replace it than repair it. Some life expectancy!

    bratsche
    A bunch of stringed instruments tuned in fifths. And a bunch of cats!


    "There are two refuges from the miseries of life: music and cats." - Albert Schweitzer

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