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Thread: "Chords are just arpeggios"

  1. #41
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    "Chords are just arpeggios played fast" is absolutely correct

    If you are down strumming, you first hit the 4th string and then the 3rd, then the 2nd and lastly the 1st string. They are played in sequence, not simultaneously. The fact that the separation is not easily heard does not make them actually simultaneous.

    All chords are arpeggios. Even if you pluck all 4 strings, if you record that on an oscilloscope, you will find that the 4 strings do not start absolutely simultaneously. Therefore, stop quibbling. It is not possible to manually play 4 strings simultaneously - all chords are arpeggios.

    Nuf said

    sopher

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by sopher View Post
    "Chords are just arpeggios played fast" is absolutely correct

    If you are down strumming, you first hit the 4th string and then the 3rd, then the 2nd and lastly the 1st string. They are played in sequence, not simultaneously. The fact that the separation is not easily heard does not make them actually simultaneous.

    All chords are arpeggios. Even if you pluck all 4 strings, if you record that on an oscilloscope, you will find that the 4 strings do not start absolutely simultaneously. Therefore, stop quibbling. It is not possible to manually play 4 strings simultaneously - all chords are arpeggios.

    Nuf said

    sopher
    Although I agree that a strummed chord is a fast arpeggio....
    If you can't hear the separation, and need to slow it down mechanically..... is there a difference if you pluck them simultaneously?

    Here's a thing....
    An up strum and a down strum do sound different.
    So you can can hear a separation. The first note in the attack is different, and the last note on the stack also makes a difference
    And a fast strum sounds different from a slow strum, which is really the same as a slow vs fast arpeggio.

    But if you pluck, you don't hear the separation.

    In the end, its the ear we are trying to influence, by up strum, down strum, or pluck.
    If we make a difference in how we play it to get that sound... then there is a difference.

  3. #43
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    <pedant alert>
    When you downstrum a re-entrant tuned Ukulele, are you playing an arpeggio or a broken chord?

    I suggest the latter as you are not going low to high through out but start high then drop to low

    Does it really matter?
    </pedant alert>

    Seriously, one of the features of reentrant tuning is it down plays the difference between the down strum and the up strum since the strum in both directions starts with a high note.

    As others have pointed out elsewhere it also changes the chord voicing compared with linear tuning as it puts the "bass" of the chord in a different place i.e. You are playing different inversions of the chord with the two tunings
    Geoff Walker

    I have several ukuleles in various sizes and am not planning on getting any more...

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    I also play some blowy things and a squeezy thing

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  4. #44
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    I'd say that many, but not all, chords are just arpeggios played fast. Besides when they are plucked (simultaneously), what about when a chord has a 7th in it, for example? That note is in the chord, but it is not in the arpeggio....

    bratsche
    A bunch of stringed instruments tuned in fifths. And a bunch of cats!


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  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by bratsche View Post
    I'd say that many, but not all, chords are just arpeggios played fast. Besides when they are plucked (simultaneously), what about when a chord has a 7th in it, for example? That note is in the chord, but it is not in the arpeggio....
    bratsche
    You could play arpeggios for all types of chords, not just triads- 7th chords, dim7, aug, etc

  6. #46
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    Okay, I concede your point. I was commenting while so fondly remembering my teen years, and the violin arpeggio studies.... 1,3,5,1,3,5,1,3,5,1,5,3,1,5,3,1,5,3,1.... up and down three octaves (sometimes four), major and minor in every key. Ugh!

    bratsche
    A bunch of stringed instruments tuned in fifths. And a bunch of cats!


    "There are two refuges from the miseries of life: music and cats." - Albert Schweitzer

    GearGems - Gifts & apparel for musicians and more!

  7. #47
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    As I have sometimes told students- you have to do it, it is good for you, like eating your vegetables!

  8. #48
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    Wanna cite the Federal Statute or Supreme Court ruling that so narrowly defines arpeggio?

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by ubulele View Post
    First, check any dictionary. Almost all say somethings like:
    arpeggio: the notes of a chord played in succession, either ascending or descending.

    Then, try Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arpeggio

    Yes, a lot of people (even many regarded as authorities) use "arpeggio" as a fancy synonym for "broken chord," but technically arpeggios are only certain types of broken chords.
    Don't be the old fart that thinks that dictionaries are the world of God and language is immutable. Dictionaries are always changing and they are always behind. They add words to the dictionary and change the meanings of words all the time because they haven't kept up with life.

    For pianos I will accept fancy smancy broken chords vs arpeggios. For ukes, broken chords = arpeggios, most chords are normally played inverted and there is no difference. It isn't reasonable to say arpeggios are only non-inverted when most of the chords are inverted - don't you want to insist that everyone is "strumming inverted chords, not chords?" You make me laugh. Especially when you think wiki is some kind of supreme reference. You know that's not allowed in formal bibliographies, right. Hey, you can call them broken chords, or you can call them arpeggios, or you can call them hippopotamus, but I'll call them all arpeggios, and "technically" it's all good. I hope you can lower your nose enough to read this without hurting your neck! ;-)

  10. #50
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    In my Guitar Lessons I learned: The term "arpeggio" means 2 different things:

    1. The notes of the chord are played in succession (broken chords)
    2. Arpeggios as melodic patterns using the notes of the chord

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