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Thread: Banjo uke in low g

  1. #1

    Default Banjo uke in low g

    Considering buying a banjo uke. I play my Tenor uke in low g and wondered how low g and high g compare on a banjo uke.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Twin Cities, Minnesota, USA
    Posts
    261

    Default

    Well I'm sure you could do it, but somehow it just seems like a crime against nature to put low G on a banjo uke. I have low G on my two regular ukes, but have kept a high G on my Magic Fluke Tenor Firefly. It just sounds right.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    PHX, AZ
    Posts
    2,144

    Default

    I've never done it either on any banjo uke that I own/have owned. I am not a fan of low G in general, and I'm guessing I would be even less so on a banjolele.... However, I'm interested to hear your thoughts if you do it.
    "If a lot of people play the ukulele, the world would be a better place to live."

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    JoCo, NC (near Raleigh)
    Posts
    3,287

    Default

    Replying to see what others say. I wanted to try low G on my tenor GoldTone but couldn't due to the tailpiece not accepting a fat G string. Traded it for a chambered body to try something else different. If I ever get another banjo uke it will probably be ordered with low G (or low A more likely) in mind.
    Current Stable:
    -Ohana TKS-15E - Eb cuatro
    -Iriguchi Tenor "Weeble" - Bb, SC SMU
    -Blue Star 19" baritone Konablaster - DGBE
    -KPK pineapple SLN-GCEA
    -Cocobolo 16" SC#1-gCEA, SC SLMU
    -Ono #42 19" baritone, Ab, LW
    -Imua iET-Bb, M600
    -Covered Bridge CLN pineapple - Eb cuatro, SC XLL
    -Rogue bari
    -Bonanza super tenor, FBL cFAD
    Once upon a time:
    -RISA Concert Stick
    -Bruko sop. custom #6
    -Lanikai lam hog bari
    -Kala SLNG
    -Bruko bari
    -Gold Tone BUT


    Jim's Blog

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    712

    Default

    As a builder of banjo ukes I believe they are at their best with high g, or in other words, sounding like a banjo uke should sound. However, if low G is your bag, go for it, just don't be surprised if it don't sound like it should.
    Kind Regards
    Dennis

    dpophotography@yahoo.co.nz
    Southern Cross Instruments
    New Zealand

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Wiltshire, UK
    Posts
    355

    Default

    I owned a vintage (I guess 1930s or so) "Tonella" banjo ukulele until recently which was evidently designed to take a low G, as the hole for that string in the tail-piece was that much larger than the other three, as was the friction tuner! I never played it with a low G myself as I play left-handed so I can't tell you what it sounded like in that configuration. The banjo uke itself was rubbish quality - the frets were very visibly unevenly-spaced so intonation was always awful. I eventually sold it at a car boot sale in the hope that somebody would stick it on the wall as a decoration and never torture anyone by playing it again.

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