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Thread: Loprinzi Mahogany Soprano (Model A)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    Default Loprinzi Mahogany Soprano (Model A)

    Model A
    Solid Mahogany Top, Back and Sides
    Unbound Body
    Satin Finish
    14 Frets to Body
    19 Fret Rosewood Fingerboard

    This Uke is in great condition. Even at 14 frets to body, it is still a normal soprano scale and not a SS. I have owned it for about 4 weeks. Purchased new from Spruce Tree Music. Reason for selling is that I have contracted a very bad case of UAS and I am funding for another soprano that I just purchased. The only mark I can really see is on the back of headstock. See in photos. Comes with case. $Sold,Thanks! Shipped in lower 48. Only US sales at this time. Please email or PM with questions. I can also send more photos if needed.
    Thanks,
    Chris





    Last edited by cds; 04-26-2018 at 12:31 PM.

  2. #2
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    st. paul, MN
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    Purty!
    Trying to wrap my head around this: does 14 frets to the body mean it's smaller bodied or bridge saddle is further from bottom bout than a regular soprano...?
    Tracie

    Island Koa Instruments, prototype soprano, Peter Howlett #153
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    Kanile'a K1 Concert
    Kamaka 1969 Tiki Concert
    Kala Elite 1MHG Concert
    Larrivee UT40MHO spruce/hog Tenor
    Guild Bari

  3. #3
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    Tracie,
    I do not think the body is smaller. I put it up against my Martin and it seems to be the same size body. Maybe has something to do with the bridge placement. This is the answer I got from Loprinzi after I bought it.

    "Hi Chris,

    No it's not a concert scale and it would have been marked as an super soprano(SS) if it was. We changed our standard neck joint to 14 frets to the body several years ago for both sopranos and concerts.

    Thank you
    Edette Yancey/Sales
    LoPrinzi Guitars and Ukuleles"


    That is all I know. Maybe someone will chime in. It does sound nice though. Just not getting played as much as the Martin.

  4. #4
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    Jan 2010
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    I have seen some Loprinzis that have 12 frets to the body, but many seem to be 14, which I think are sometimes referred to as long necked or super sopranos by other makers. (although don't quote me on that) It would be interesting to see how they measure, but from the pics, the bridge does not seem to be different from a standard soprano. Some instruments I have seen from other makes seem to have it placed differently.
    Last edited by EDW; 04-21-2018 at 12:42 PM.

  5. #5
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    Utah
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    Kanilea & Islander sopranos are 14 frets to the body. They are soprano scale, and not super/long neck sopranos.

    I'm assuming this has the 1 3/8 inch nut like most Loprinzi ukuleles?
    My ukulele family.....
    Islander Acacia laminate soprano
    KoAloha concert - circa 2006
    Loprinzi cedar & rosewood concert
    Gary Gill concert scale tenor, Douglas Fir & Mahogany

  6. #6
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    Not a super soprano. All things (scale length, body size) being equal, a 14th-fret join moves the bridge higher on the body (toward the sound hole). Some will say that this causes the bridge to miss the "sweet spot" on the lower bout, but it can be argued that the added resonance/sustain from the extra wood in the neck makes up for any loos of sound.
    (Some will disagree with everything I said, and I'm okay with that).

  7. #7
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    Price drop $375

  8. #8
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    Springfield, IL
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    Hey cds, I know this can be difficult to quantify, but from one of your photos (showing a close-up of the friction pegs) it looks like this uke has a fairly "slimline" neck; in other words, when you're playing in first-position, it's relatively easy to get your hand around the neck, as opposed to certain necks that kind of feel like you're holding onto the barrel of a miniature baseball bat. Would you describe this one as being more in the "slim" category? (Again, I'm not talking neck width, as much as neck "depth".) Thanks!
    Last edited by Bill Sheehan; 04-26-2018 at 05:21 AM. Reason: clarification

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Sheehan View Post
    Hey cds, I know this can be difficult to quantify, but from one of your photos (showing a close-up of the friction pegs) it looks like this uke has a fairly "slimline" neck; in other words, when you're playing in first-position, it's relatively easy to get your hand around the neck, as opposed to certain necks that kind of feel like you're holding onto the barrel of a miniature baseball bat. Would you describe this one as being more in the "slim" category? (Again, I'm not talking neck width, as much as neck "depth".) Thanks!
    Yes. I would say your description is accurate. Let me know if you have any other questions.

  10. #10
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    Thanks! -Bill

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