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Thread: Sandwiched necks

  1. #11
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    Apr 2014
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    Bellevue, KY
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    There are many studies similar to this one on the interwebs. What I never see are studies showing the opposite to be true.

    ABSTRACT:

    "The neck of guitar is a mechanical structure with a complex geometry which involves many operations and technological solutions with minimal materials consumption, and providing rigitdity to maintain the strings tension during the playing. meeting these requirements is an ongoing challenge for manufacturing because the wood used in the structure of the guitar neck is different as a speicies, as a structure, as physical-mechanical properties and rheological behavior. The paper containing mahogany-maple-mahogany and others containing masarnduba-maple-masaranduba. The samples were subjected to the three-point bending with different intensities of loads (400, 800, 1000, 1400 N), determining for each maximum deflection and the maximum stresses. It was found that the use of laminated wood increases the rigidity of the guitar neck and the bending resistance; the most advantageous combination is masaranduba-maple-masaranduba."

    "Keywords: solid wood, glued laminated wood, guitar, three points bending, stifness, beam of constant strength"

    RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

    "Analyzing the values of maximum displacement in the force direction, it was found that samples from solid wood presents the greatest deflections, regardless of the applied load , which is about 120..250% higher than values obtained on laminated wood samples made from m asaranduba with maple (Fig. 4 a, b). This indicates that guitar neck stiffness can be increased by using a combination of least two wood species"

    http://aspeckt.unitbv.ro/jspui/bitst...%28Engl%29.pdf
    Victor Jones
    Blue Frog Ukuleles

    Bellevue, KY
    bluefrogvic@gmail.com
    http://bluefrogukes.weebly.com/index.html

  2. #12
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    Dec 2009
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    Massachusetts, USA
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    After all that, I need a sandwich, thanks!

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2018
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    Kekaha, Kauai
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    21

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    For my arch top guitars and ukulele, I sandwich a v shaped piece of mahogany between two pieces of maple, cut at 45 degrees. When shaped the neck looks like a piece of bookmatched maple with a thin mahogany stripe down the back. It is in fact about 70% mahogany, which is far more stable than maple.

  4. #14
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    Another angle on this...just got on a LoPrinzi tenor, with a sandwiched (laminate) neck. The depth of the neck is thinner than most, so I assume the laminate neck provides additional strength, although I see some LoPrinzis without it.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2015
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    333

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    Quote Originally Posted by Diogenes Blue View Post
    There are many studies similar to this one on the interwebs. What I never see are studies showing the opposite to be true.

    ABSTRACT:

    "The neck of guitar is a mechanical structure with a complex geometry which involves many operations and technological solutions with minimal materials consumption, and providing rigitdity to maintain the strings tension during the playing. meeting these requirements is an ongoing challenge for manufacturing because the wood used in the structure of the guitar neck is different as a speicies, as a structure, as physical-mechanical properties and rheological behavior. The paper containing mahogany-maple-mahogany and others containing masarnduba-maple-masaranduba. The samples were subjected to the three-point bending with different intensities of loads (400, 800, 1000, 1400 N), determining for each maximum deflection and the maximum stresses. It was found that the use of laminated wood increases the rigidity of the guitar neck and the bending resistance; the most advantageous combination is masaranduba-maple-masaranduba."

    "Keywords: solid wood, glued laminated wood, guitar, three points bending, stifness, beam of constant strength"

    RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

    "Analyzing the values of maximum displacement in the force direction, it was found that samples from solid wood presents the greatest deflections, regardless of the applied load , which is about 120..250% higher than values obtained on laminated wood samples made from m asaranduba with maple (Fig. 4 a, b). This indicates that guitar neck stiffness can be increased by using a combination of least two wood species"

    http://aspeckt.unitbv.ro/jspui/bitst...%28Engl%29.pdf
    So what does that tell us? Does it tell us that a laminate neck is stronger than a solid neck? No. The proper way of doing this would be to use the same wood in the laminate as the solid piece. By adding different woods to the laminate sandwich it is no longer apples to apples comparison but rather apples to oranges. What if solid samples of the Mahogany and the Masaranduba were stronger than the solid Maple? Making a sandwich of them and the maple is naturally going to be stronger.

    Sorry, I worked in a mechanical test lab and broke my share of samples. This paper is not worth a heck of a lot.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
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    Bellevue, KY
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    Most laminated necks include center strips of contrasting, quartersawn, woods that are often equally as strong or stronger than the main blank. Stronger more often than not. I think when builders talk about sandwiched necks, this is what we mean. Otherwise we'd be making bread sandwiches; small slices of bread between two pieces of bread, which doesn't seem very interesting or appetizing to me. Some, a few, are laminated from the same stock. I'd guess they'd be at least less susceptible to warping, possibly even stiffer, than a neck that hasn't been laminated, due to the opposing grain patterns. Wood goes where it wants to go, but it can be tamed, relaxed, stiffened, made stronger, by arranging it in various ways.

    Here's an illustration.

    laminated bread2.jpg
    Last edited by Diogenes Blue; 05-09-2018 at 07:09 PM.
    Victor Jones
    Blue Frog Ukuleles

    Bellevue, KY
    bluefrogvic@gmail.com
    http://bluefrogukes.weebly.com/index.html

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
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    669

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ukecaster View Post
    Another angle on this...just got on a LoPrinzi tenor, with a sandwiched (laminate) neck. The depth of the neck is thinner than most, so I assume the laminate neck provides additional strength, although I see some LoPrinzis without it.
    This reminds me of the Ibanez Super Wizard electric guitar necks. They are about as thin (depth) as they come and they use a similar multi ply neck.

    http://www.ibanez.com/products/u_eg_...329&color=CL01
    Last edited by bsfloyd; 05-10-2018 at 03:14 AM.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
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    Bellevue, KY
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    I'm a fan of the Super Wizard. That RG is one wicked nice guitar.
    Victor Jones
    Blue Frog Ukuleles

    Bellevue, KY
    bluefrogvic@gmail.com
    http://bluefrogukes.weebly.com/index.html

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