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Thread: Converting guitar chords to Uke chords

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    Cape Cod Massachusetts
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    Default Converting guitar chords to Uke chords

    Is there a simple format or formula, where I can take a guitar chord in normal guitar tuning and find its equal on a uke tuned in GCEA?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Santa Barbara, CA
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    I'll assume that you know most basic and intermediate guitar chords. I went through this myself. SO many shapes are the same as on the guitar, but the names are different. The same shapes on the uke are a fifth up from the guitar equivalent. Guitar shape 'D' is now the G chord. It took me weeks to generate a new set of names in my old brain for the shapes that I have known most of my life. And as a bonus, there are numerous Uke chord shapes that are different and very fun to learn.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    near Raleigh, NC
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    Here's an online source:

    http://www.ezfolk.com/uke/chords/

    This sounds like one of those things where you have to learn the new "names" or "shapes" (depending on your perspective.) More experienced players will have a more detailed/knowledgable response.

    Have fun.
    "When I'm not playing ukes, I'm volunteering at a shelter for battered fish sticks." -- Dave Alexander

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Buffalo, New York
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    http://www.chordie.com/

    They have tons of songs on there and on the right hand side you can select the tuning. Its set to guitar by default, but you can change it to "Ukulele (c-tuning)". The page will refresh itself and it will show you where to put your fingers for all the chords.
    ----------------------------------
    youtube.com/ukebrudders

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    Coastal SC
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    I sure can't think of one. I play Guitar,baritone, and GCEA and ADF#B tuned ukes and it gets confusing sometimes. You kind of get used to it. When I perform I usually do one set on the same instrument. I've swapped around from song to song and it ends up being a problem if I play a song that I do on different instruments. But if I play a song that I only play in that tuning on that instrument muscle memory usually kicks in.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    716

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    If you put a capo on the guitar at the 5th fret, the shapes you play are now Uke shapes. So the D shape, with the capo on the 5th, is a G, and it's the same on the uke, but of course missing the lowest two strings.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Collingwood, ON Canada
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    3,647

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    The shapes are what matter. 0232 is G on a uke, D on a guitar, but still 0232 (or 000232 on a guitar). If you need to rename the chords, use a chord wheel/transposer.

    Here's mine: www.ianchadwick.com/essays/ukulele/chord%20wheel.pdf

    If you set the outside D (for the guitar chord) against the inside G (for its ukulele name), then you only need to look at the name of the guitar chord on the outide to see its ukulele name on the inside wheel.

    It's also handy for changing keys when you want to shift pitch.
    Ian
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