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Thread: New toy (I mean tool, I mean jig) - DIY Binding Routing Jig

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    Kapolei, Hawaii
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    Default New toy (I mean tool, I mean jig) - DIY Binding Routing Jig

    Okay, so Paul Okami told me I HAVE to try out the StewMac True Channel Binding Router jig.
    http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Tools/Ji...uting_Jig.html

    Up till now, I've been doing it Taylor style, with a modified bearing foot on my laminate trimmer.

    Of course, I've seen this before, but I really didn't want to use a bearing (or buy the set) as I enjoy the bearing foot on the laminate trimmer for its infinite adjustments. Plus, this is a project in itself. I did take some of the dimensions for the parallelogram though.
    http://www.dewguitars.com/BindingJig/Binding%20Jig.htm

    Being the cheap ass that I am, I made my own, with leftover parts from my cab builds. And, I didn't have to buy a full set of bearings and the bit.

    If it seems too simple, it is. Vertical motion is 3.5".

    I bandsawed out the opening for the bearing foot depth.

    Underneath the jig, yes, the spacer is made of 1/4" ply, rounded at the edges (no synthetic here). Good enough - it does what it should.

    The carrier only fits a tenor (with 3 braces on the outside edge, and one very loose so I can clamp a small piece to "tighten" the body). The piece in the center I place under the back, when doing the top.

    Cost? 4 bolts, 4 nuts, and 8 nylon washers - everything else was scrap. Okay, maybe some staples and screws, big deal. Let's just call it about $5.
    Attachment 35816Attachment 35817Attachment 35818Attachment 35819

    This is one of those "what took you so long" things, like getting a Foredom or Knew Concepts saw - you don't know what you're missing until you have it.

    Aaron
    Last edited by Kekani; 04-01-2012 at 11:10 PM.

  2. #2
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    Stockton on Tees..North East UK.
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    Well made job considering the cost..But I advise using the type of cutters with bearings fitted central..cos' the way you have it means you have to keep the bearing constantly at 90 degrees to the workpiece edge to avoid having an uneven channel depth.... if you know what I mean
    http://ukulele-innovation.tripod.com ebay i/d squarepeg_3000

  3. #3
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    Apr 2008
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Timbuck View Post
    Well made job considering the cost..But I advise using the type of cutters with bearings fitted central..cos' the way you have it means you have to keep the bearing constantly at 90 degrees to the workpiece edge to avoid having an uneven channel depth.... if you know what I mean
    Actually, there's enough play in it that 90 degrees is not that critical. I found that out when I switched to a 3/4" bit from a 1/4" bit, much cleaner cut too.

  4. #4
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    Mar 2009
    Location
    Columbus, IN
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    773

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    I use a DeSoutter balance arm for mine. I have a donut shaped ring on the bottom so that I can do arch top instruments. I also use a bit with a fixed bearing. It makes it much easier to use. Stole this idea from Pete.

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