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Thread: What's the difference between a good uke and a great uke?

  1. #21
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    What's the difference between a good uke and a great uke?
    How much you like it.
    If everybody wanted peace instead of another TV, then there would be peace.
    -John Lennon-

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevepetergal View Post
    What's the difference between a good uke and a great uke?
    How much you like it.
    I agree much to do with the player. When I look at demos on HMS they make an average Uke sound really good. I think a bigger price tag just makes it sound more appealing. There must be a cut of point (price) where a luthier could make a very good instrument for very little money.
    I am getting one made at the moment for very little money. I have read great reviews about the maker and I am expecting a very good instrument. I just think it is part of the UAS you do not really find it much in the guitaring community. Dont get me wrong I do want a really good Uke as mine has a few dead spots on it. But how much does it really cost for a very good instrument without all the hyped up sales ?
    Bruko Custom Concert.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uke Whisperer View Post
    The person who plays it.
    Yup.

    And, I'll add that a great uke is any uke you personally love, while good ukes are all the others.
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  4. #24
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    "There must be a cut of point (price) where a luthier could make a very good instrument for very little money."

    Speaking as a professional wood turner, the only way to do that is to devalue your labor and your skills.
    Having said that, any luthier's (or artist's in my case) hourly wage is already obscenely low.

    If you are getting a quality hand made anything for a very low price, thank the maker, it was a labor of love.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shazzbot View Post
    Having said that, any luthier's (or artist's in my case) hourly wage is already obscenely low.

    If you are getting a quality hand made anything for a very low price, thank the maker, it was a labor of love.


    There's a big difference between mass-produced commodity goods and those made by individual (or small teams of) craftsmen. If the difference is unimportant to you then buy the commodity version & enjoy the savings. If you are fortunate enough to be able to afford an artisan's creation then you will not only get a superior product, but also something that transcends mere commerce.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shazzbot View Post
    "There must be a cut of point (price) where a luthier could make a very good instrument for very little money."

    Speaking as a professional wood turner, the only way to do that is to devalue your labor and your skills.
    Having said that, any luthier's (or artist's in my case) hourly wage is already obscenely low.

    If you are getting a quality hand made anything for a very low price, thank the maker, it was a labor of love.
    That is why you do turning I would imagine because you get enjoyment from it, if it was for money you would do something else. I would imagine the maker of my Uke does it more on a hobby basis. I do agree with you though about people with skill on such a low rate compared to say footballers which I think is ridiculous.
    Bruko Custom Concert.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by imabuddha View Post


    There's a big difference between mass-produced commodity goods and those made by individual (or small teams of) craftsmen. If the difference is unimportant to you then buy the commodity version & enjoy the savings. If you are fortunate enough to be able to afford an artisan's creation then you will not only get a superior product, but also something that transcends mere commerce.
    I already have a mass produced one. The custom one is only going to cost a little more.
    Bruko Custom Concert.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by philrab66 View Post
    I already have a mass produced one. The custom one is only going to cost a little more.
    As with most things, the costs of mass-produced products, custom-made products, and the skill of those who make them, vary widely.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoiDog View Post
    a great uke is any uke you personally love, while good ukes are all the others.
    Very well put, Dog.
    -Ralf Youtz

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  10. #30
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    Here are my two cents.

    A great uke is one that makes you smile, one that you care for. You wash your hands before picking it up, make sure it's clean before you put it away. The action on the fretboard lets you play without thinking about it. Once in a while, you stop and play some random notes just 'cause it sounds so good. It's an ukulele you're hoping you'll get a chance to show to other people.

    So this means that the definition of a great uke will change over time. Every uke I've had has been a great uke. The first one was great as I had so much fun with it and it was my first experience with an ukulele. I decided to upgrade when I realized that things would be better wish something that was better built. This meant going from the $100 range to the $500 range. When I looked, I found that for the most part, anything between $100 and $500 were slight incremental and often aesthetic improvements. At around $500 however, there was a marked improvement in build quality, materials, details and action. The difference was sufficiently noticeable to make the expense seem natural.

    My second one was great because it blew the first one out of the water. Holding it, playing it, interacting with it was precious. I would have kept it except that after a year of finger pain trying to manoeuvre the soprano fretboard with my massive hands, I had to aim for a tenor.

    My current and third uke is a great uke because... well. I can't think of something better I could obtain. I could obtain similar instruments. But I honestly can't think of something that would top it, save for aesthetic sophistications.

    Just depends on whether you're trying to define what a great uke for you is, or what others understand a uke to be.

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