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Thread: F chord problem

  1. #11
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    One last piece of advice. I have pudgy hands and when I play a soprano I have to make sure I have good technique with my left hand. Make sure the pad of your thumb is placed properly on the neck (middle-ish of the neck), it allows your fingers to move much more freely.
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  2. #12
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    Also, besides placing your middle finger on the G-string, second fret, please place your thumb behind the second fret so that it is NOT visible from the front of the ukulele. Some players try to play and form chords with the neck of their ukes cradled in the web of their palm instead of placing their thumbs in the middle of the back of the neck behind fret 2 (generally). There should be quite a bit of space between the web of your palm and the neck of the uke (NOTE: 'should' as in 'you may find it helpful' vs 'must' )

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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ukeshale View Post
    Welcome to UU, Rollie. I don't know if you meant to say "index finger on the G thread" but if you did then try index finger on the E string and your middle finger on the G string. Putting your index on the G may be your problem. Good luck. Practise makes perfect.
    Good eye...

    Wow...I just tried fingering it the other way 'round and that is tough!

    John
    I'm not entirely convinced that it is possible to polish a turd. However, if one were to accomplish that feat one would still have a turd, and one all the more noticeable for being shiny.

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  4. #14
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    Oct 2012
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    First I want to say thanks for the replies and suggestions!
    Second I want to also thank the few friends here saw my typo, yes I meant middle finger on G (I need to carefully check this sentence). As a very beginner I understand I am going to have a lot of practice and hard times on it, but I am willing to try. Thanks again for the help, and sure I will be posting here if I face trouble again!

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Rod Higuchi View Post
    ...please place your thumb behind the second fret so that it is NOT visible from the front of the ukulele. Some players try to play and form chords with the neck of their ukes cradled in the web of their palm instead of placing their thumbs in the middle of the back of the neck behind fret 2 (generally). There should be quite a bit of space between the web of your palm and the neck of the uke (NOTE: 'should' as in 'you may find it helpful' vs 'must' )
    Classical guitar players keep their LH thumb behind the middle of the neck, acoustic/electric players are often known to do otherwise, who am I to argue with what works for them. But I do agree you get better range/ease of movement for your other fretting fingers if you do it the "proper" way.

  6. #16
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    I am a beginner ukulele player, and initially learned the F chord in the usual manner (index finger on 1st fret on E string, and middle finger on 2nd fret on G string, but I find that awkward on my wrist to make and awkward in terms of transition to/from other chords, and have been finding that the converse (middle finger on 1st fret on E string, and index finger on 2nd fret on G string is easier for me (despite my hot dog fingers) and less likely for me to create string interference on the C string.

    Am I asking for trouble down the road if I keep on with my variant manner of playing F, and would it be preferable to keep pushing ahead with the usual manner of playing?

    Thanks for any thoughts.
    Last edited by marpole; 04-24-2018 at 06:05 AM. Reason: adding information

  7. #17
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    FWIW I think you should definitely keep practicing the standard fingering and it will come.
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  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by marpole View Post
    I am a beginner ukulele player, and initially learned the F chord in the usual manner (index finger on 1st fret on E string, and middle finger on 2nd fret on G string, but I find that awkward on my wrist to make and awkward in terms of transition to/from other chords, and have been finding that the converse (middle finger on 1st fret on E string, and index finger on 2nd fret on G string is easier for me (despite my hot dog fingers) and less likely for me to create string interference on the C string.

    Am I asking for trouble down the road if I keep on with my variant manner of playing F, and would it be preferable to keep pushing ahead with the usual manner of playing?

    Thanks for any thoughts.
    I could write a treatise on all the stupid little stop-gap tricks in which I engaged while trying to learn E maj or Bb maj. Ultimately I abandoned them and they were nothing more than wasted time. I would suggest going back to the standard fingering, or try using your middle and ring finger (which will leave your index free for barre chords). To my way of thinking, the real problem is your arm. At least in my experience, whenever I had your issue, it was due to the arm. I had (have) a tendency to keep the arm immobile from the shoulder to the wrist. That means the hand itself has to do all the acrobatics. However, if you move your entire arm, then you can put your wrist in a more favorable position. Try moving your elbow around and see if you cannot find a better starting position for your wrist.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by coolkayaker1 View Post
    And then something with a baritone neck to make it harder once again.
    Baritones are sometimes easier than tenors depending on music background and hand size!
    My current stable:

    (Son of Snaggletooth) Romero Creations Tiny Tenor Spruce & Rosewood
    (Coco) Hanknn Koa Concert
    (Spruce Bringsteen) Burks Spruce Soprano
    (bootleg) aNueNue pineapple Concert
    (Toothless) IZ thinbody soprano w/ pickup

    not a Ukulele but the tenor guitar DGBE is called (Mange).

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ripock View Post
    To my way of thinking, the real problem is your arm.
    Not only the arm, it's usually the general posture and way of holding the uke.

    My way of doing it: hold the uke up high (male players have some advantages here), hold it with the crouch of your right elbow and forearm against your chest - a bit like a baby. Point the neck upwards and have the headstock approximately on shoulder height. It should have a rather stable position even without using your left hand. Now bend your left elbow and put your left thumb behind the neck (middle-ish) and your fingers have lots of freedom to wander around the fretboard. Try not to turn the fretboard towards you for better visibility - sooner or later you won't need that anyway so better not start that habit at all.

    Strumming is mostly a movement of the wrist, you hardly need your forearm for that - and the "best" strumming position is not over the soundhole but more where the neck is attached to the body (~12th fret)

    Don't
    - rest the uke on your lap like a guitar (use a strap when necessary)
    - strangle the neck with your fretting hand
    - press too hard on the strings, be gentle and press only as hard as necessary
    - forget to have fun

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    more about all my ukuleles on just.4str.in

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