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Thread: Kerfed lining vs solid linings

  1. #1
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    Default Kerfed lining vs solid linings

    Hello ive notice some ukuleles with Kerfed linings and some with just solid wood strip linings. if there a difference in sound, strenght, weight etc.

    im thinking the solid lineing is lighter

    but the kerfed lining has more glueing area for the sound boards and looks to be stronger?

  2. #2
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    You're comparing apples to oranges. One could easily make solid linings that are heavier and have more surface area than some kerfed linings. Just about the only generalization one could make is that solid linings are probably stiffer...but even that can be worked around. Why not build with both and see for yourself? That's part of developing your own building style.

  3. #3
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    Thanks Rick , have you tried both? and do you preffer one over the other in your exprience?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Turner View Post
    You're comparing apples to oranges. One could easily make solid linings that are heavier and have more surface area than some kerfed linings. Just about the only generalization one could make is that solid linings are probably stiffer...but even that can be worked around. Why not build with both and see for yourself? That's part of developing your own building style.
    http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/fo...4978&noquote=1

  4. #4
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    I've used both, and if you aren't going to install bindings on the instrument, then a single strip of solid lining is pretty easy and neat.

    However if you are going to add bindings and perhaps purflings, those solid linings will need to be made thicker and that usually entails laminating a few layers up. This of course adds time and complexity to the job, and that's where the kerf style comes into it's own.

    To make the kerf lining stiffer they can be made with the web to go opposite of what you usually see (reverse kerf linings) and these will certainly make the rims much stiffer than they would be otherwise.

    And if you are like many of us who have a variety of styles and shapes to instruments, making solid linings to fit all of them just isn't feasible. Much more manageable from a time and stocking perspective to have kerf linings that will fit everything you build
    Allen R. McFarlen
    Cairns, Australia

    Email allen@brguitars.com
    Website Barron River Guitars & Ukuleles

  5. #5
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    As the man says...and it's so.

    Yes, I have done super stiff sides/top rim area on a couple of ukes, and frankly, it doesn't seem to make much difference. However, I do double the sides from top rim down about an inch, then use reverse kerfing, and then top that with a layer of carbon fiber on some of my higher end acoustic guitars. I think it helps sustain. But then I'm doing a whole bunch of things that are different, too.

  6. #6
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    and Koaloha doesn't use them at all.

  7. #7

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    I've used both (on guitars and ukes) and now prefer reverse kerfed linings on top and back, because...

    They stiffen the sides (well, you can have floppy(er) reverse kerf linings but generally they are stiffer).

    They cut neater when notching the back braces.

    I think they look neater (my subjective view, some prefer 'normal' kerfed linings)

    Harder is wrangle into submission though but most you buy from luthery supply places (LMI, RC tonewoods etc) give a pretty manageable reverse kerfed lining compared to the shop made ones im used to using.

    Tone wise, ...perhaps a computer could tell............all things being equal,..... which they never are .
    ~ Beau Hannam Ukuleles ~
    Grand Junction, Colorado
    Email- beau@beauhannamguitars.com

    www.beauhannamguitars.com
    www.facebook.com/beauhannamguitars


  8. #8
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    I can't really add to anything Beau and Rick have said, but you should simply ask yourself "What is the purpose of the linings?", in which case your answer should be -

    Primarily to provide a gluing surface for the top and back plates.
    Last edited by DewGuitars; 06-01-2013 at 06:01 AM.

  9. #9
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    I make solid linings on all my guitars & ukes, either single or laminated.
    When they are laminated, the inner piece is shorter, "stepped".
    I've been making them this way since I began, and it is characteristic of my instruments.
    I don't argue that they are better than any other type, but they help shape my sound, and I like my sound.
    Even if it could be proven that one way was stronger, or had some advantage, would that require me to do it that way?
    Is there a law or rule that we have to all build the same way?
    Have Courage!
    Guitar & ukulele building, repairs also, 38 yrs. in business.
    http://davidnewtonguitars.squarespace.com/repairs/

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by strumsilly View Post
    and Koaloha doesn't use them at all.
    Beat me to it. My Bruko doesn't have linings either.

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