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View Full Version : Wide Grain vs Tight Grain Sound Board? Engelmann Spruce



sam13
09-05-2014, 03:44 AM
Hello All,

I am looking at buying another Pono Pro Classic Tenor. Just love the product at its price point.

I have a choice with respect to a few options and one has extremely wide grain and the other tight grain.

I understand the dark lines are the winter growth and the wider section is the summer growth ...

I am curious as to what a wider grain effect will be on tone. I am looking to buy it from a retailer at a distance so I won't have a chance to sit with them and play them thoroughly before buying.

The Tenor with the wider grain has a cutaway, and I might fancy a cutaway since my other Tenor isn't. The tighter grain Tenor has a beautiful back and side and is a little cheaper due as it is a second.

Does anyone have any theory, experience or hard facts to help me with my decision?

Thanks for your thoughts.

Skinny Money McGee
09-05-2014, 04:31 AM
Would be a good question to ask in the Luthier's Lounge

Dan Uke
09-05-2014, 06:19 AM
I've asked about other spruce (Adi & German) and the maker said it's the stiffness that matters.

ukantor
09-05-2014, 06:32 AM
"It's the stiffness that matters."

So they tell me.

JC.

sam13
09-05-2014, 07:15 AM
I've asked about other spruce (Adi & German) and the maker said it's the stiffness that matters.

Hey nongdam,

So you are suggesting a tighter grain produces a stiffer wood and thereby a different tone? More sustain?

DownUpDave
09-05-2014, 08:19 AM
I've asked about other spruce (Adi & German) and the maker said it's the stiffness that matters.

That is what I was told. Tight grain pattern does not necassarily mean stiffer and wide grain does not mean less quality sound.

Is that what you meant nongdam

Dan Uke
09-05-2014, 08:33 AM
That is what I was told. Tight grain pattern does not necassarily mean stiffer and wide grain does not mean less quality sound.

Is that what you meant nongdam

that's what they said

hawaii 50
09-05-2014, 08:45 AM
that's what they said

Hey Daniel..who is they? haha:)

I know tight straight grained Englemann is what builders want...(because in general stiffer,nicer etc..) but I think the builder the most important....since the Pono's are production model even though built by one person...best to play before you buy....

I would ask Andrew or Corey to pick one out for you...the new Pono's all have binding on the fretboards just for you Daniel....:)

Dan Uke
09-05-2014, 08:50 AM
Hey Daniel..who is they? haha:)

I know tight straight grained Englemann is what builders want...(because in general stiffer,nicer etc..) but I think the builder the most important....since the Pono's are production model even though built by one person...best to play before you buy....

I would ask Andrew or Corey to pick one out for you...the new Pono's all have binding on the fretboards just for you Daniel....:)

haha. Did you hear that new Toda Uke that Andrew just got? That's some nice tight grain.

hawaii 50
09-05-2014, 08:53 AM
haha. Did you hear that new Toda Uke that Andrew just got? That's some nice tight grain.

I missed the recording...but will try to see it before it is gone...if not already....:)

yeah the Spruce top is nice...

this one right...

http://vimeo.com/105318632

Dan Uke
09-05-2014, 08:59 AM
Wow...sold quick...Andrew told me about it yesterday.

sam13
09-05-2014, 10:13 AM
I just heard a clip of both ... now, I am even more confused. The wide grained one is wide at the side and comes in nice and tight at the sound hole.

Rick Turner
09-05-2014, 10:17 AM
Everyone should stop listening with their eyeballs and erase all the wide grain/tight grain myths from their memory banks. I've seen perfectly straight and incredibly tight grained spruce that had the tap tone of wet shirt cardboard. And then if you brace floppier wood properly with more cross grain bracing, you can make it work pretty well. That's an old Spanish guitar making trick...controlling cross grain stiffness with wider splayed fan braces.

gyosh
09-05-2014, 10:34 AM
Everyone should stop listening with their eyeballs and erase all the wide grain/tight grain myths from their memory banks. I've seen perfectly straight and incredibly tight grained spruce that had the tap tone of wet shirt cardboard. And then if you brace floppier wood properly with more cross grain bracing, you can make it work pretty well. That's an old Spanish guitar making trick...controlling cross grain stiffness with wider splayed fan braces.

Spray it black.

Worked for me :)

Camsuke
09-05-2014, 04:18 PM
This video may be of interest, grain thickness is talked about at 4:25.


http://youtu.be/2hcI8LpD5V0