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View Full Version : When designing a new uke shape, do you consider volume, as in, internal space?



Matt Clara
09-08-2014, 02:15 AM
I'm designing a new shape for my ukes, all in a cad program that allows me to easily select the uke body and click measure>volume. I was wondering if anyone else thought about volume when coming up with a new design, as in, a soprano should have a volume of X, plus/minus Y, etc.,?

tangimango
09-08-2014, 02:26 AM
My guess is no. Ive seen really thin body design ukuleles volume up the roof and really thick wide body sound low in volume. Volume no, distinct sound maybe. Look at koaloha sceptres, pineapple, juke . Unique shape.

BlackBearUkes
09-08-2014, 04:00 AM
Yes, volume is a consideration, as is almost everything else. Too much air space inside the body, and the sound is muted and wolfy. Too little and the sound is thin and more treble like. For a good overall design of air space, just consider the Martin family of ukes.

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
09-08-2014, 05:03 AM
Max internal uke space is easy to know as it happens to correspond with the biggest uke case you can buy

Kekani
09-08-2014, 08:12 PM
Yes and no.

With my Tiples, and the tendency to be high pitched, I followed Martin's lead and extended the heel and tail block by a 1/2".

With the cutaway's, I increased the heel block by 1/4". Not even sure how much difference it made.

With the first two MGM Thinlines, I threw caution into the wind and just took out an inch at the heel and tail, completely expecting disaster, especially with the all Maple one. Not sure how he knew, but he did, and I actually have #3 on the bench.

rar jungle
09-17-2014, 07:29 PM
Yes and no.

With my Tiples, and the tendency to be high pitched, I followed Martin's lead and extended the heel and tail block by a 1/2".

With the cutaway's, I increased the heel block by 1/4". Not even sure how much difference it made.

With the first two MGM Thinlines, I threw caution into the wind and just took out an inch at the heel and tail, completely expecting disaster, especially with the all Maple one. Not sure how he knew, but he did, and I actually have #3 on the bench.

A lot of people love the sound of the thinlines. It almost seems like they are louder and more resonant than a normal ukulele. Do you, or does anybody have any ideas why they seem louder and more resonant than an ukulele with a more traditional body size and shape?