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UkeyDave
09-18-2014, 04:04 AM
Hi Folks,
As I've recently started to experiment with playing certain songs that are normally in a major key in a minor key I thought it would be good to create a thread where seasonistas can put their MAJOR to MINOR song versions. I thought it would be nice to see them in one place so please feel free to drop them in here.
Cheers

UkeyDave
09-18-2014, 04:06 AM
Bad Moon Rising. I'd love to see multiple versions of the same song as well as other songs in this thread.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0cDVtphhjdQ

UkeyDave
09-18-2014, 04:07 AM
Sloop John B

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHuYfSJrxng

elmann
09-18-2014, 05:33 AM
MAJOR to MINOR song versions.
Great idea.
Although now showing some experience in tonality, I always struggled and failed with this. (Maybe I'm to lazy to find that keys which has to be flat/sharp for a transposition)

redpaul1
09-18-2014, 06:19 AM
I think I can lay claim to having started this trend off. Here's one from Season 59 - Where has the time gone? (April 2013)


here's a bonus entry - can't quite believe that no-one's picked this one as their official entry.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_uS_Gm5zJ68

we tigers
09-18-2014, 07:13 AM
I love this.
Check the awesome Gonzales. He's been doing this for quite a while:

http://youtu.be/FxOmWWE8qP4

Harry122
09-18-2014, 04:05 PM
Here's my Popeye in A minor:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I82jgg1Gczw&feature=youtu.be

pabrizzer
09-18-2014, 09:22 PM
Not something I do very often......

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=waHFawZRSfM

pabrizzer
09-18-2014, 10:06 PM
so here's one done today

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IckrkYYfBk8

Harry122
09-19-2014, 02:33 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bQEfpVdgRL0&feature=youtu.be

pabrizzer
09-19-2014, 02:00 PM
Michael Row in Am

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cFBo3_DbFLU

CeeJay
09-19-2014, 02:27 PM
Actually ...just to be a pissed ant...pissant ...peed....pedant....should it not be Transposing ?

Coat ...have it .....*slam*

UkeyDave
09-20-2014, 05:59 AM
Actually ...just to be a pissed ant...pissant ...peed....pedant....should it not be Transposing ?

Coat ...have it .....*slam*
Well if you can explain transposing from a major to a minor go ahead. I'd love to know how one transposes from one to the other.

lelouden
09-20-2014, 09:58 AM
Ya! I myself would love to know how to do this. Apparently you need knowledge in music theory and I don't really get it. I would have to try this entirely by what sounds right to me! I did go searching for an explanation and found this. Maybe it would help you....If your like me, maybe not so much!

This was answered on "Yahoo Answers"-

Devon answered 10 months ago

It most certainly is possible to do an entire major/minor transposition like this, but it requires some music theory knowledge.

G, D, Em, C progression in G major becomes Gm, D, Eb, Cm.
Why? It's based on scale degrees of the chords.
There are 7 notes in every scale (8 to complete the octave). Each note in the scale can be given a number from 1-7.
Just as there are 7 notes to a scale, there are 7 chords found in that scale, all based off of the different notes in that scale.
In G major, G would be 1, A is 2, B is 3 and so on. So the progression you have here is what we call a "I-V-vi-IV" progression in major because G=1, D=5, E=6 and C=4.

Translating a key to its parallel minor requires you to flatten (lower) the 3rd, 6th and 7th notes in the scale by a half-step to give it the "dark, sad, minor feel." Similarly, you have to do the same for chords built off of these notes.
In the key of g minor, the 3, 6 and 7 are lowered, melodically, while harmonically, only the 3 and 6 are lowered. So a scale changes from G-A-B-C-D-E-F#-G in major to G-A-Bb-C-D-Eb-F(F# in harmony)-G

As stated before, you have a 1-5-minor6-4 progression. So to translate to minor:
1) change all major chords to minor. This will give you a "i-v-vi-iv" (minor1-minor5-minor6-minor4) progression in a minor key.
2) find anywhere you have a 5 chord (D in the key of G) and make that major. The 5 chord will 99% of the time be major in any minor key (due to dominant function, which is another subject altogether). You should now have a "i-V-vi-iv" progression
3) find your 3 and 6 chords and lower them by a half step. In G, E (the 6th note in a G scale) becomes Eb (E flat)
4) change your originally minor chords to major (the exceptions are the 2 chord, which becomes half-diminished and the 7 chord, which is fully diminshed in minor. Don't worry about the restrictions on this rule if you don't have 2s or 7s). You should now have a "i-V-VI-iv" progression and have finished the harmonic transposition.
5) Change the melody to have the properly flattened notes so it fits with the altered chords.
6) Play your progression and listen to it!

Hope this helps! Good luck!

Source:
Trombone Performance Major in University, Minor in Composition and Arranging.

This concept is taught in Theory I-II and put into practice in Composition/Arranging I

elmann
09-20-2014, 11:27 AM
Major to Minor change - answered on "Yahoo Answers"-

Thanks a lot, Linda! That's the good 'n short explanation I always searched for.

lelouden
09-20-2014, 12:10 PM
Thanks a lot, Linda! That's the good 'n short explanation I always searched for.

Your sure welcome! I'm glad it helped someone:)

CeeJay
09-20-2014, 01:15 PM
Well if you can explain transposing from a major to a minor go ahead. I'd love to know how one transposes from one to the other.

Every major key has a relative minor...C major's relative minor key is A minor because both have the same key signature ...i.e. no sharps or flats ...Am appears in the C major chord progression....so to transpose (which just means moving notes up and down the stave to different keys) from C major to A minor just substitute the chords in C major for the ones in A minor..........Ist Chord would be C in C major ...Ist would be would be A Minor in.. erm, A Minor...I have detailed files on board ...I will get them out.....

That's as clever as I can get on a Saturday after beer and wine.....:cheers:

Tootler
09-20-2014, 02:47 PM
You are quite correct, CJ but the idea is to keep the range of the song the same. So if your song has a range of one octave from C to C', you need to keep that range. In my case I can comfortably sing a song that has a range from C to C' an octave up but if I were to make it minor by going to A minor I will not be able to sing it because I cannot comfortably sing the top A (I can just about manage it in the choir). So the change will be from C major to C minor. That keeps the range of notes the same but the key signature of Cm is three flats so you will need to replace E, A and B with Eb, Ab and Bb. That's OK but the chords also change. Linda above correctly explained the chord replacement based on classical music theory so the chords for Cm are Cm, F, G7 and Am. Unfortunately that requires a fudge so, to make these harmonies work, in classical music theory they have three minor key scales which are arrived at by sharpening either the seventh or the sixth and seventh notes of the natural minor scale which for Cm is C D Eb F G Ab Bb C.

Now to throw in another wobbly. Many folk tunes are modal and in folk music, the most common minor key mode is Dorian. the Dorian mode starts on the second note of the relative major scale, so the Dorian mode relative to C major is D dorian and the scale is D E F G A B C D. One feature of Dorian mode tunes is you can often harmonise them using the chords on the 1st, 5th and 7th degrees of the scale (ie the i v and VII chords) which for D dorian gives Dm, Am and C. I've got one which I hope to record tomorrow where I have done just that. I went from D major to D dorian so replaced the chords of D, A and G with Dm, Am and C and it worked pretty well though I did tweak the tune a bit. :music:

CeeJay
09-20-2014, 03:07 PM
Woah ....hang on ...I made what I thought was a facetious and hopefully humorous quip and it's all got " reyully seriusss "...sorry ...I seem not to have got the hang of this ukelele forum thang........

bird's eye view of my ukelele
09-20-2014, 03:36 PM
i would totally engage with this discussion

if i had a big enough brain

lelouden
09-20-2014, 03:41 PM
i would totally engage with this discussion

if i had a big enough brain

Me too...Thats why I used someone else's and it still didn't help!

DWitt
09-20-2014, 05:11 PM
Here's one from way back in Season 76! There are some further notes and the chords (and chords shapes) on the YT page.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PxuYtKOlpwQ

Tootler
09-20-2014, 11:12 PM
Woah ....hang on ...I made what I thought was a facetious and hopefully humorous quip and it's all got " reyully seriusss "...sorry ...I seem not to have got the hang of this ukelele forum thang........

You need to add a smiley or two if you don't want your post to be taken too seriously.

UkeCan1 2.0
09-21-2014, 03:12 AM
I for one am glad for all this music theory enlightenment. This is a really cool game, and without all this info, when I tried it, I discovered it was not as obvious as I thought exactly what chords to change to and how to make it sound right.

One of my very favorite things about the Seasons has been learning so much about music, musicians, music history, and especially how music gets made.

So I am loving this thread ... even if I'm not fully understanding all of it ... yet.

I trust that when I take some time to try it out and noodle around with it ... I learn best by doing ... (don't most of us?) ... that I will finally start to get a clearer understanding of all this major-minor-key stuff and how they relate.

I'm looking forward to that!

(But first I have a Beach Boys song and one I wrote about my cat to video today ... three 50's songs to select for myself, and the entire Ohio Ukulele Campout next weekend to corral into a group entry ... and THEN I have two minor-key songs I am working on transforming to major ... because that's fun too. I think Geoff has just helped me lot with figuring out exactly how to do that, and why one of them wasn't quite working before. :) )

CeeJay
09-21-2014, 03:44 AM
You need to add a smiley or two if you don't want your post to be taken too seriously.

Check. Roger ,Wilco .

pabrizzer
09-21-2014, 05:08 AM
You Are My Sunshine

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PfEWNUQudys

mythinformed
09-21-2014, 08:47 AM
Sorry guys but to be honest, for me it doesn't sit comfortably on my ears.........the change is too dramatic to the point where either the mood and feel of the song is lost or it sounds like a completely different song altogether.

Maybe it would work on a song I haven't heard before then there would be no expectations of how I think it should sound or feel?

Jazzbanjorex
09-21-2014, 10:05 AM
Two or Three years ago I ran across a YouTube video of a guy in a bar on a ukulele where he played Sweet Home Alabama in a minor key. It was good. I asked if I could steal it. He said okay. I can't find it to post it right now, dag nab it!

Tootler
09-21-2014, 10:05 AM
Wild Rover in Dm

I learnt a minor key version of the Wild Rover in Folkworks Summer School a few years ago. It gives the song a whole different feel. This isn't the tune I learnt back then but a new one based on the tune the Dubliners used and made famous but transposed to Dm. I made a few changes to the melody and mucked around with the chords a bit. As myth said above simply replacing the major chords with minor doesn't always work and in this case instead of D, A & G I have used Dm, Am & C as I said in my post above in the discussion on music theory.

In effect you often need to write a new tune based on the original.

The words I used are different as well. The Version of the song made famous by the Dubliners was actually collected in Norfolk (England) but there are several versions in Broadsides dating from the Early 19th century and what I sing here is based on these. It is thought it was originally a temperance song and one theory is that it may have originated in the Southern USA but that is not certain. What is known is that the song entered the oral tradition and was collected in the late 19th century in several versions in England. The basic story is pretty constant but sometimes the wanderer goes back to his parents and sometime to his wife. The Broadsides usually contained an extra, moralising verse but the versions collected orally have usually dropped that verse as I did.

I added some FX to the uke and overdubbed my voice in the chorus.



http://youtu.be/ewQEL05AQo0

Tootler
09-21-2014, 10:11 AM
You Are My Sunshine
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PfEWNUQudys

This is terrific. It gives the song a real bluesy feel which suits the verse lyrics.

Tootler
09-21-2014, 10:20 AM
Sorry guys but to be honest, for me it doesn't sit comfortably on my ears.........the change is too dramatic to the point where either the mood and feel of the song is lost or it sounds like a completely different song altogether.

Maybe it would work on a song I haven't heard before then there would be no expectations of how I think it should sound or feel?

You're used to the idea that each song has just one tune it's sung to but that's not necessarily the case. In folk music the same song is often wedded to different tunes and conversely, tunes can often be used for different sets of words. There is no rule that says that a particular tune and set of words must go together. It's an interesting exercise to set words to different tunes and going from major to minor definitely gives a different feel to the song.

Take the Wild Rover as an example. The tune that became well known gives it a "Let's all get together and have a good time" feel which is not really what the lyrics are about. Sing it to a minor key melody and it makes it a more reflective song which, in my opinion, suits the lyrics far better.

Keep listening and you will find you can adjust and maybe get something out of a song that you didn't realise was there.

mythinformed
09-21-2014, 11:11 AM
You're used to the idea that each song has just one tune it's sung to but that's not necessarily the case. In folk music the same song is often wedded to different tunes and conversely, tunes can often be used for different sets of words. There is no rule that says that a particular tune and set of words must go together. It's an interesting exercise to set words to different tunes and going from major to minor definitely gives a different feel to the song.

Take the Wild Rover as an example. The tune that became well known gives it a "Let's all get together and have a good time" feel which is not really what the lyrics are about. Sing it to a minor key melody and it makes it a more reflective song which, in my opinion, suits the lyrics far better.

Keep listening and you will find you can adjust and maybe get something out of a song that you didn't realise was there.
It was the feel/mood of the song I mentioned rather the the lyrics/words. Some well known, lyrics, riffs and progressions have been used, re-used and regurgitated many times as 'original' pieces of work so we know this works.
What I'm saying is that for me a song loses the original emotion/feel that the composer intended to convey to the listener in changing it to this extent.

Its personal preference at the end of the day, theres no right or wrong if something gets your toes tappin' !!

Jazzbanjorex
09-21-2014, 12:37 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I-5e_shNwp4&feature=youtu.be

pabrizzer
09-21-2014, 02:28 PM
Sorry guys but to be honest, for me it doesn't sit comfortably on my ears.........the change is too dramatic to the point where either the mood and feel of the song is lost or it sounds like a completely different song altogether.

Maybe it would work on a song I haven't heard before then there would be no expectations of how I think it should sound or feel?

Yes - kind of agree with you - which is why I posted 3 very well known songs here.
It certainly changes the mood and parts of the melody of the original.
And that's a bit hard to take if you have affection for the original.
If you go the way you mentioned early and go to the relative minor (eg C to Am) you can stick a lot closer to the original melody line.
If you just change most of the original chords to their minor alternative it is a major change (sorry).
Totally understand where you are coming from.

lelouden
09-21-2014, 09:35 PM
Ok , So here's a question.

If you are changing the key to the relative minor from the original key, and the song is set up I IV V Vi, do you just use the new key in that same pattern?

My common sense thinks that you would stay close to the melody and use whatever chords that sound right in the new key family and forget rules.

Maybe if someone that has done a simple recognizable song like "You Are My Sunshine" could show us the original chording, and then the relative minor key chord changes . Visually that may help me?!

Maybe not.....its way past my bed time and I don't know why Im even trying to use my brain:/

wee_ginga_yin
09-22-2014, 02:34 AM
Dancing in the desert with a call a call and response to You are my sunshine.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e2KlIzXYrAU

auntieuku
09-22-2014, 02:53 PM
:rolleyes:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VuBPV0QnkNs

Harry122
09-22-2014, 03:36 PM
Hi Linda, I made a quick video moving You Are My Sunshine to a minor key. Hope it helps a little!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0zniUyrh8j0&feature=youtu.be

pabrizzer
09-22-2014, 03:52 PM
More Happy.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KZy2TpOLPHw

lelouden
09-23-2014, 01:31 PM
In season 135 I did a song "Froggie Went A Courtin'," (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P723Z04PED4) Alan made a comparison to "Way Down Yonder In A Minor Key." Both songs are boy meets and a relative stepping in and causing drama and the melody tune is the same. I don't know if Woody Guthrie and Billy Bragg's (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vwcQAlRn0Gs) intentionally borrowed from "Froggie" that was set to music in the 1600's or not. But it sure seems that way. "Froggy and Minor Key" are both written in a major key! Thanks to Alan for giving me this idea. This has been the perfect song and story to "minor up." Although the story seems even more creepy than ever before. I did include all the verses to the story. It was only appropriate to do so.

Thanks to those that have helped with advice on how to go about this. I had it figured out with some major chords left in until I watched Randy's tutorial help and took another look at it and changed those majors to minors, Em Am Bm. Thanks Randy for that. It was a major minor help:)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sZGNadwITl8&feature=youtu.be

elmann
09-23-2014, 10:24 PM
Ok , So here's a question.
If you are changing the key to the relative minor from the original key, and the song is set up I IV V Vi, do you just use the new key in that same pattern?
Yes. Transposing is counting semi-tones.
The name of a chord is given by its "lowest" tone/note. If you transpose a set of chords, all have to be shifted by the same number of semi-tones. A row of e.g. I IV V Vi has to have the same distances afterwards.

If you change a melody from Major to Minor, one is doing another thing: the melody makes its semi-tones between other steps. See e.g. by Harry122:
- C-Major: the melody's base is the c, and if you play the scale I, II, III ... Viii, the semi-tone steps E/F and B/C are between III/iV and Vii/Viii.
Going to
-A-Minor: the melody's base is now a, and if you play again the scale I to Viii, the same semi-tone steps are now between II/III and V/Vi.
This causes the "sad" sound.

It's easy on a piano: Use only white keys, play CDEFGABC (C) or ABCDEFGA (Am).
Therefore melodies in C or Am dont need a "#" on note sheets.
And the circle of fifth is only counting: You wanna sing "your are my sunshine in G?"
So C >5th is> G (or Am->Em): you need for your melody one "#" on the note sheet. Please use one black key on the piano.
Next 5th: D/Bm then needs two "#". And so on.

And when it becomes to crowdy with # on the note sheet, forget the "#" and take one "b" :cool:

Everything's counting semi-tones.

lelouden
09-24-2014, 07:06 AM
Thank Elmann, These free online classes are great:)

BigDaddyUker
09-26-2014, 07:51 AM
Holy HELL...I need a nap...Not sure I could spell music now...

wee_ginga_yin
09-27-2014, 09:34 PM
David Lynch inspired version of Teddy Bear.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SVwU_9ZcGSk

peewee
09-28-2014, 06:48 PM
Here's one that belongs here, I guess..an unusually upbeat song all minored down.

http://youtu.be/AYdHjJIXQXI

http://youtu.be/AYdHjJIXQXI
I used the principles outlined here:
https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20131207192941AAkLEyX

"It most certainly is possible to do an entire major/minor transposition like this, but it requires some music theory knowledge.
G, D, Em, C progression in G major becomes Gm, D, Eb, Cm.
Why? It's based on scale degrees of the chords.
There are 7 notes in every scale (8 to complete the octave). Each note in the scale can be given a number from 1-7.
Just as there are 7 notes to a scale, there are 7 chords found in that scale, all based off of the different notes in that scale.
In G major, G would be 1, A is 2, B is 3 and so on. So the progression you have here is what we call a "I-V-vi-IV" progression in major because G=1, D=5, E=6 and C=4.
Translating a key to its parallel minor requires you to flatten (lower) the 3rd, 6th and 7th notes in the scale by a half-step to give it the "dark, sad, minor feel." Similarly, you have to do the same for chords built off of these notes.
In the key of g minor, the 3, 6 and 7 are lowered, melodically, while harmonically, only the 3 and 6 are lowered. So a scale changes from G-A-B-C-D-E-F#-G in major to G-A-Bb-C-D-Eb-F(F# in harmony)-G
As stated before, you have a 1-5-minor6-4 progression. So to translate to minor:
1) change all major chords to minor. This will give you a "i-v-vi-iv" (minor1-minor5-minor6-minor4) progression in a minor key.
2) find anywhere you have a 5 chord (D in the key of G) and make that major. The 5 chord will 99% of the time be major in any minor key (due to dominant function, which is another subject altogether). You should now have a "i-V-vi-iv" progression
3) find your 3 and 6 chords and lower them by a half step. In G, E (the 6th note in a G scale) becomes Eb (E flat)
4) change your originally minor chords to major (the exceptions are the 2 chord, which becomes half-diminished and the 7 chord, which is fully diminshed in minor. Don't worry about the restrictions on this rule if you don't have 2s or 7s). You should now have a "i-V-VI-iv" progression and have finished the harmonic transposition.
5) Change the melody to have the properly flattened notes so it fits with the altered chords.
6) Play your progression and listen to it!

Hope this helps! Good luck!"

redpaul1
09-29-2014, 01:25 AM
I used the principles outlined here:
https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20131207192941AAkLEyX

"It most certainly is possible to do an entire major/minor transposition like this, but it requires some music theory knowledge.
G, D, Em, C progression in G major becomes Gm, D, Eb, Cm.
Why? It's based on scale degrees of the chords.
There are 7 notes in every scale (8 to complete the octave). Each note in the scale can be given a number from 1-7.
Just as there are 7 notes to a scale, there are 7 chords found in that scale, all based off of the different notes in that scale.

Based "off of"? Based "off of"?? Based ON!!!:wallbash:
:)

wee_ginga_yin
11-07-2014, 11:04 PM
It is time high noon became wry noon.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2qAEMrLvCe4

UkeCan1
11-30-2014, 11:15 AM
Being the contrarian, Happy Song Girl that I am, when I first saw this thread, I thought ... I'll do the exact opposite.

I picked out two dramatic minor-key songs to transform to a happy major key, worked on them, and forgot all about it.

One of them was this one, which also qualifies for Welsh week, Season 145. It's good I waited, because it's perfect for my "Happy to Be ME!" hot pink Minnie Mouse plastic Wal-Mart $10 Black Friday special new uke.

So, here's Minnie, channeling Mary Hopkin, and "Those Were the (Happy) Days":


http://youtu.be/J8Zdh6AtrZk

Harry122
06-24-2015, 09:00 AM
Here's the Gilligan's Island theme, moved to a minor key. Those poor, shipwrecked people.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a5a10iZPBYA&google_comment_id=z12subaj1n2dedo1h232ghiw4siqyxr5 i04&google_view_type