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Icelander53
09-23-2014, 01:04 PM
How many here prefer their ukes in Low G tuning? How many have most or all of their ukes in low G tuning? Why do you prefer low G? Do you have any problems with playing with others or doing most songs if you are in low G?

I've just started playing in low G and now reentrant sounds kind of strange and weak.

Ukejenny
09-23-2014, 01:13 PM
I love low G for certain songs or certain kinds of playing. In a group, it helps to have some low G's to make the sound fuller if you don't have any baritones or if you don't have a Ubass. I still play my reentrants mostly. And that may very well be due to the fact that our only low G is a tenor and I'm a concert/soprano player. But I do enjoy the sound when I get my low G tenor out. I don't think my concert or soprano sounds strange or weak, but each of them have a pretty full and lustrous tone with good sustain. My concert has better sustain than my little soprano, but it is a small body soprano. Still love the jangly sound of it though. I'm talking in circles, aren't I. But, it is kind of cyclical - I play whatever instrument to suit my mood I guess.

DownUpDave
09-23-2014, 01:18 PM
You have ventured far into the dark side young skywalker.

I am the opposite..........sort of.:-)I love the sound of low G when someone else is playing it, when I play one it really bugs me. Maybe my string selection was not optimum for the one uke I had set up low G. More than likely the songs I play and ALL my ukes are reentrant so MY ears are conditioned to hear that sound when I am playing.

When the twin brother to your Pono lands in my hands I might give it another honest try. How is the ebony cedar sounding now that you have had it a while, still marvelous?

Rllink
09-23-2014, 01:20 PM
I don't own a uke strung with a low G. Everyone is on their own journey. My journey is with reentrant tuning. For me, playing within that tuning is a challenge in itself, and it is where I'm going. Low G sounds nice, and it has its advantages, but that just isn't where I'm going. So that is just me.

Ukulele Eddie
09-23-2014, 01:24 PM
I am the opposite..........sort of.:-)I love the sound of low G when someone else is playing it, when I play one it really bugs me. Maybe my string selection was not optimum for the one uke I had set up low G. More than likely the songs I play and ALL my ukes are reentrant so MY ears are conditioned to hear that sound when I am playing.



My sentiments exactly. I plan eventually to pick a handful of songs to play low G and then give it a serious try for about six months, likely keeping one uke re-entrant and the other low G. Well, that's my plan and I'll either stick to it or I won't. ;-)

Ukejenny
09-23-2014, 01:27 PM
I will probably never be only low G or only reentrant. I like the sounds of both and like many genres of music, some of which will lean one way more than the other.

katysax
09-23-2014, 01:28 PM
I regularly use both tunings, each has their place. For just playing chords in a uke group it doesn't matter which you use.

Icelander53
09-23-2014, 01:29 PM
You have ventured far into the dark side young skywalker.

I am the opposite..........sort of.:-)I love the sound of low G when someone else is playing it, when I play one it really bugs me. Maybe my string selection was not optimum for the one uke I had set up low G. More than likely the songs I play and ALL my ukes are reentrant so MY ears are conditioned to hear that sound when I am playing.




When the twin brother to your Pono lands in my hands I might give it another honest try. How is the ebony cedar sounding now that you have had it a while, still marvelous?

Can't say enough good things about it and in low G with south coast strings I love the way it sounds and plays to my own ear. Donna love's it too and hers should be here today actually. She's gone low G also. I like the low G so much I'm thinking of restringing my other Pono. Hence this thread. I'll still have the Gretsch in reentrant.

SteveZ
09-23-2014, 01:31 PM
On any given day all of my ukuleles are tuned low-G (G3) GDAE or CGDA with low-G with "reentrant" C (C4). I just like the sound and they chord-up just the same as my other stringed instruments. The convenience of one chording pattern across several instrument types/sizes works for me.

Down Up Dick
09-23-2014, 01:36 PM
I had a low G until the ol' red string broke. It was all right I guess. I liked the extra three notes it gave me, but that was when I was trying not to fingerpick. I like my Lo-DGBE baritone though which is of course similar. :old:

anthonyg
09-23-2014, 01:51 PM
I play mostly in low G. Or in my case its low E or F. It suits my fingerpicking style and its a better accompaniment to my voice. I get the feeling some people are trying to kid themselves by repeating the mantra that its "only 3 lower notes" When your playing chords its an octave difference compared to the reentrant tuning which has the bass note an octave higher and it makes quite a difference. A ukulele is not the instrument I would pick to play solo bass note runs.

Anthony

Icelander53
09-23-2014, 02:19 PM
You have ventured far into the dark side young skywalker.

I am the opposite..........sort of.:-)I love the sound of low G when someone else is playing it, when I play one it really bugs me. Maybe my string selection was not optimum for the one uke I had set up low G. More than likely the songs I play and ALL my ukes are reentrant so MY ears are conditioned to hear that sound when I am playing.




When the twin brother to your Pono lands in my hands I might give it another honest try. How is the ebony cedar sounding now that you have had it a while, still marvelous?
Just heard from Donna on her new Pono cedar/ebony cutaway in log G. Big thumbs up.

brimmer
09-23-2014, 02:20 PM
I play both low G and reentrant. I keep one uke strung with low G, the others are reentrant. Overall I prefer reentrant because the high g string is good for for melody notes. But there are some jazz tune arrangements that really need that low G to get the chords to sound nice. My right hand style changes with the tuning. In low G, I play more low-to-high arpeggios, and in reentrant, I rely on strumming for rhythm. Also when I strum in low G, I only lightly touch the low G string when I strum. That's my low G secret - keep the low string quiet when strumming. Even while picking, muting the low string is a must. It overpowers the little guys.

UkerDanno
09-23-2014, 02:25 PM
only Only ONLY HIGH G for me...any ukes with low G sound boomy to me!

PeteyHoudini
09-23-2014, 03:33 PM
Great topic!

Basically, I loved playing the uke at first for its interesting re-entrant tuning. It confused my ear (musical hearing) at first with that high G sounding as I would try to sing while strumming chords. That forced me to try to do chord inversions to counteract that effect because I found that the high G caused me to sing the wrong melody notes (usually ones in harmony though!). hehe

Finally, after years, I worked it out. My musical brain is finally used to hearing that re-entrant tuning. That being said, I have some tenors and I will go low G on my new Martin 2K once I finish my review of it. Why? I already have a concert re-entrant uke if I want more steam and sound, and I want to explore flamenco techniques with the low G on the tenor. I've noticed by practicing some flamenco stuff on the tenor with re-entrant tuning that it really misses the low register.

I guess it really depends what you intend to play and in what key. I guess I'm saying I can appreciate the need for a low G tenor uke now. 8-)

Petey

itsme
09-23-2014, 03:54 PM
I'm primarily a fingerpicker. Some arrangements really need the low G to sound right. It extends the uke's range a bit. For strumming, it doesn't make that much difference, although re-entrant sounds a bit more traditional for that.

Of my seven tenors, two are in low G.

kohanmike
09-23-2014, 04:11 PM
Playing for only a year hi G, a couple of weeks ago I picked up a solid body steel string electric and went low G on it (getting ready to do a sample video). It's still strange sounding to me and I'm not sure I'm going to keep it that way.

VegasGeorge
09-23-2014, 05:16 PM
Right now my Soprano, and Concert Ukes are all re-entrant tuning, and my Tenor is strung with a Aquila Red low G. I like the low G on the Tenor, but prefer the re-entrant tuning on the smaller body Ukes with brighter tone quality. I tend to strum the smaller Ukes more, and pick the Tenor more. So, somehow the low G seems right for the Tenor. But I think it's entirely subjective, and that's just my way of doing it.

wickedwahine11
09-23-2014, 05:22 PM
It took two or three attempts for me to successfully maintain a low g on a uke. But once I finally went to the low g side, I never went back. I can't carry a tune in a bucket, and since I can't sing, I play only fingerpicking instrumentals. In that realm, low g is great. When I do strum, it is usually a jazz song. and low g colors those chords nicely.

I have four ukes - two low g (my primary player and backup) and two high g (kept that way in case I feel like playing a high g uke). But if I am being honest, for me it is low g 99.9% of the time.

Steveperrywriter
09-23-2014, 05:48 PM
Low-G only. Taste ...

coolkayaker1
09-23-2014, 05:57 PM
I use high-G because Jake, Aldrine, Eddie V., Gerald, and Tiny Tim use it.:p


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WZOOGU5HxWc

I know, I know, Brittni, Taimane, blah blah use low G. But who cares. lol

coolkayaker1
09-23-2014, 06:02 PM
Ice, it's a Pono!! (High G, naturally)



[
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-8l0_mzi9no

chikon2000
09-23-2014, 06:13 PM
Hopefully this is not too far off topic, but would a 5 string uke solve the linear vs. re-entrant tuning dilemma, since you would have 2 G strings tuned an octave apart?

Icelander53
09-23-2014, 06:26 PM
Ice, it's a Pono!! (High G, naturally)



[
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-8l0_mzi9no

looks like cedar. thanks for sharing.

Icelander53
09-23-2014, 06:28 PM
only Only ONLY HIGH G for me...any ukes with low G sound boomy to me!

I've always felt that way also. Andrew put a south coast G on and told me it's got a lot less boom to it and I agree. I like it.

hammer40
09-23-2014, 08:46 PM
I have one uke strung low G, and most likely that will be it. It can be a bit boomy, some ukes handle it better than others and the string choice makes a difference as well. For me, it can be a nice departure but not for everything or all the time.

RAB11
09-23-2014, 09:20 PM
I have my Korala strung with Low G Aquila Reds, it's my go-to uke because I like having doubled notes in different octaves in some chords and it helps with finger picking very well.

My Dolphin is in high G and I do still use it when I need that brighter tone but it's strumming only. I intend to get a slightly better High G-dedicated uke at some point but the Dolphin's fine for now.

Tigeralum2001
09-23-2014, 11:03 PM
I use high-G because Jake, Aldrine, Eddie V., Gerald, and Tiny Tim use it.:p


I thought Jake and Aldrine used low g... Never paid too much attention.

I'm a 99% low g player. Some ukes just don't sound good with a low g, some songs won't work with one of the two, so I keep 1 uke around with a high g.

PhilUSAFRet
09-24-2014, 03:35 AM
I prefer low G in larger ukes, primarily my tenors, and I use it mostly for blues and jazzy numbers. I currently have my Kala solid mahogany tenor strung with Hilo low G's with wound 3 and 4, very mellow strings, because that is the sound I want (kind of "old time" blues/jazz sound). I had them on my Cordoba tenor and loved them on it too. I would probably use brighter ones for country, folk, and ?????.

Rllink
09-24-2014, 04:32 AM
I thought Jake and Aldrine used low g... Never paid too much attention.

I'm a 99% low g player. Some ukes just don't sound good with a low g, some songs won't work with one of the two, so I keep 1 uke around with a high g.I think that Jake commented on the challenges of re-entrant tuning in Life on Four Strings.

coolkayaker1
09-24-2014, 04:38 AM
I thought Jake and Aldrine used low g... Never paid too much attention.

.

Hi, CJ. No, Jake's always high G (that I've ever seen on his videos, tutorial books, etc.)

Aldrine, too, is way more common high G. As he says here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7eX7r_JOp8

I believe that James Hill is mostly high G, also.

I know I put this one up a lot, but at 2:32 minutes in this video, professional Gerald Ross explains the magic of high G. Good video for new players.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XLIWRfY66A0

These posts are not to convince anyone to play high G over low G; threads on high versus low G come up every other month, so those of us in the UU family sort of know who among us plays what. It's all personal choice. If some of you want to thud along with a low G ruining every song, be my guest.

:D:D

DownUpDave
09-24-2014, 04:51 AM
Coolkayer1

I don't need a "Low G ruining every song" as I am quite capable of pulling that off nicely with my high G tuning. :music::music::music:

I like to keep things simple, one tuning one sketchy rendition of whatever I am playing

stevepetergal
09-24-2014, 05:31 AM
I've said it before. I can't stand low G because whatever I play it sounds terrible. And I hate re-entrant because when I play it I can't make anything sound any good at all.

wayward
09-24-2014, 10:18 AM
I seem to remember seeing a review of a 5 string uke which could be played as a 4 string low g (you could tuck one of the strings aside so it was out of action on a given song), a 4 string high g (again, tucking one string away) or a 5 string (high + low g). :cool:

coolkayaker1
09-24-2014, 11:05 AM
I seem to remember seeing a review of a 5 string uke which could be played as a 4 string low g (you could tuck one of the strings aside so it was out of action on a given song), a 4 string high g (again, tucking one string away) or a 5 string (high + low g). :cool:

Might be this one my previous UU'er John.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QaHcceFNodQ&list=UUAgBWJlWUS5d95ixRC0Gg8Q

Regardless, probably best to just play high G and learn to intermittently hum when one wants one of those five additional bass tones found on a low G.

coolkayaker1
09-24-2014, 11:07 AM
Taimane's custom Casey Kamaka is 5-string. Seen here.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CookkyMzTNE

niwenomian
09-24-2014, 12:19 PM
only only ONLY reentrant

BUT

It's only because I haven't spent time on a low G instrument. Both of my ukes are high G. I've been thinking that I should get a low G tenor somewhere down the road. More than a few time I've needed a few more notes below what my high-G concert has to offer.

Nice topic!


Nick

Steveperrywriter
09-24-2014, 02:57 PM
Kind strikes me like the chocolate-or-vanilla? question. Goes to taste, and you can't really argue with that. I don't have a problem with folks who like the one that's not my choice, it's a big tent, plenty of room. It is kind of amusing when somebody tries to convince me their way is better if they are keeping a straight face, though ...

PereBourik
09-24-2014, 06:01 PM
Kind strikes me like the chocolate-or-vanilla? question. Goes to taste, and you can't really argue with that. I don't have a problem with folks who like the one that's not my choice, it's a big tent, plenty of room. It is kind of amusing when somebody tries to convince me their way is better if they are keeping a straight face, though ...

More like boxers or briefs?

I have one strung low G. It's a Pono ATD with Loving Water low G strings; the combination is magical. Everything else is re-entrant and I love them all. My teacher plays low G and I switched to be on the same page with her. She showed up for our lesson today with her uke strung high G. Just sounded wrong somehow.

Play your uke and who cares?

Jim Yates
09-24-2014, 06:43 PM
I like high G for strumming and some picking as well. Sometimes I find that my thumb will play some melody notes on the high G even when I'm playing Travis (or Cotton or...) style. I find I really need the re-entrant G for playing clawhammer.
For most Travis style, independent thumb stuff, I would like a low G. There are also times when I run out of notes below C and wish I had that low G. I don't own a low G uke, but I probably should restring one of mine just so I have the option.

johninmass
09-25-2014, 04:12 AM
Of my 5 Ukes, 1 concert size is strung low-G. I like it, but I cannot find enough music (low-G in Tab) to keep my interest. I mostly do fingerpicking, chord melody style. Anyone know where I can get more songs that would rekindle my interest in the low-G? I would love to string up one of my tenors low-G, but I am reluctant to do so until I am convinced I will play it more.

anthonyg
09-25-2014, 05:58 AM
Of my 5 Ukes, 1 concert size is strung low-G. I like it, but I cannot find enough music (low-G in Tab) to keep my interest. I mostly do fingerpicking, chord melody style. Anyone know where I can get more songs that would rekindle my interest in the low-G? I would love to string up one of my tenors low-G, but I am reluctant to do so until I am convinced I will play it more.

Low G suits fingerpicking chord melodies down to a T. Just play it, you don't need specific tabs. Just play and see what you think.

Anthony

wayward
09-25-2014, 07:09 AM
"Might be this one my previous UU'er John.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QaHc...S5d95ixRC0Gg8Q

Regardless, probably best to just play high G and learn to intermittently hum when one wants one of those five additional bass tones found on a low G."

It wasn't that one, though it was interesting to see someone else with the same idea. The 4/5 string I was thinking of is about 14 mins and 40 secs into this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TGw6XhCwvBM I could easily become a gadget-geek type, so I kinda like it + I often hum without knowing it (being a horsey gal) so the controlled intermittent option isn't available to me without a 5th string ;)

Ukulele Eddie
09-25-2014, 07:39 AM
Anyone know where I can get more songs that would rekindle my interest in the low-G? I would love to string up one of my tenors low-G, but I am reluctant to do so until I am convinced I will play it more.

Daniel Ho's Polani album is by far my favorite ukulele music album and it's low G finger style. There is a songbook available for the songs:

http://www.danielho.com/albums/Polani.html

Icelander53
09-26-2014, 12:40 AM
I've said it before. I can't stand low G because whatever I play it sounds terrible. And I hate re-entrant because when I play it I can't make anything sound any good at all.

Well looks like you've covered all the bases.

Olblindman
10-29-2014, 02:36 PM
Hi.
I am sort of new here.....I love the low G tuning. I like to run a 'bass' line with it on many songs, and to me, it just sounds better. I have a Bruce Wei concert, a Fender Tenor, a Tom thin body Tenor and a cheapo Makala soprano all with low G. I need to know where I can buy low g strings separately, as I have pulled the low G from 3 sets now! Or, is there a specific guitar string I can use in place of a low G? I hardly ever use my guitars anymore!

(BTW, Brudda Iz played Low G tuning ...just a matter of personal likes, I guess!)

Pueo
10-29-2014, 03:31 PM
Most of my ukuleles are re-entrant. I have one tenor (the Pono) and one concert (the Kamoa) both running Low G (currently Worth Browns) and I like them that way. The Pono had low G when I bought it, and it has just remained low G.
Usually when I play Hawaiian songs I play re-entrant, when I play other stuff I play low G, but that often goes right out the window.
Oh, my six-string tenor goes back and forth between High G and Low G. Lately I have had low G and low A. I change its string arrangement pretty much every time I change strings. I also have a baritone with linear tuning. Hmmm I guess I pretty much have it split right down the middle with linear vs. re-entrant. Both have their place.

I think my next ukulele will very likely be a five string, with both high and low G.

CeeJay
10-29-2014, 03:53 PM
I think it all depends on what era you jumped into the ukelele frenzy ....for me the ukelele is:

1) Soprano/ Concert/ Banjo - uke....re-entrant , primarily strummed with occasional finger-picking of various types or styles to establish melody or emphasise melody that cannot be brought forth in the strumming.

2) Tenor and Baritone ukeleles do not float my boat.....nor does drowning their acoustic tones in great washes of pedal driven effects...although there are some who can do this most effectively , but to my mind it sounds like a guitar so why not play a guitar is the unbidden thought that runs through my head ....and I try to stop it ...I really do....I cannot help this ...I am a product of starting the uke in 1970...so shoot me...

3) When I want a deeper tone and some bass and to wash everything with pedal driven effects I pick up a guitar. Although I do only really use a tube screamer to get some bluesy distortion...and I have to own up to occasionally putting my old and sadly departed Mahalo Gibson Les Paul Copy AcElectric uke through this as well...
and my new Brunswick Acousto Electric concert thingy....:rock:;)

4) I do not hate or despise the players or the music of those who play the low g ,soprano ,concert , tenor or baritones ....I may experiment with one such and have an epiphany one day....:p

Bob-in-Alberta
10-29-2014, 04:45 PM
All of my ukes are high g. I do have a low g string though and plan on stringing my Islander tenor with it when I get home from my holiday. I met Kimo Hussey when I was buying my tenor and he told me that he's a low g guy and recommended that I give it a try. If it is good enough for him I'll definitely give it a try.

IamNoMan
10-29-2014, 04:51 PM
Hey CeeJay, I've just read through this thread. Interesting discussion but I am surprised at the visceral response the two tunings seem to evoke. I am too new at this game to experiment with the Lo G tuning. It seems to me you should walk before you run. I don't quite understand why you wouldn't want to play both ways. I certainly know that the first tunes I will work on when I get around to low G will be some 5 part piano rags. To me this is an intuitive leap but I'm certain it will work. Right know if I wish to work with a low G concept it is easier to play the banjo. That way I can use the 5th string reentrant G as well. Its like what Gerald indicated in the video above using the reentrant G on the uke as a drone. As I indicated once I get more competent with gCEA tuning I'll investigate the GCEA tunings.

janeray1940
10-29-2014, 04:57 PM
Hi.
I need to know where I can buy low g strings separately, as I have pulled the low G from 3 sets now! Or, is there a specific guitar string I can use in place of a low G?

You can use a guitar D string. There are also some uke-specific low G strings sold as singles - my favorite is the Fremont Soloist, and there are a few others out there. I find mine on eBay.

janeray1940
10-29-2014, 05:03 PM
I don't quite understand why you wouldn't want to play both ways.

Neither do I, nor do I understand why one would "hate" one tuning vs. the other. I play both, depending on the situation.

When I first started to try out low G, I made the mistake of always using the non-wound fluorocarbon strings that came in sets - and though I tried several brands, I didn't much care for any of them - which made me think I disliked low G. The non-wound strings seemed floppy to the touch and boomy to the ear. Then I tried a wound guitar string, and it sounded so much better - and I've never gone back to non-wound strings. Turns out it wasn't low G that I disliked, it was the usual string offerings that was to blame.

coolkayaker1
10-29-2014, 05:09 PM
I don't quite understand why you wouldn't want to play both ways.

Because the playing method--the actual style of play--is different on both, and that is why it is truly uncommon to see a professional play lowG and high G. It's much more than just a preference, as has been discussed here on UU many times (I thought sister JR40 had acknowledged that in past threads, actually. But, it's all good). THere's more to it than just throwing on a different G string and playing chords, truly. To long to re-hash, but let's just say the style of play of Jake, exclusively high G, is much different than Brittni, exclusively low G--string emphasis in playing, lead lines, etc. are different.

IamNoMan
10-29-2014, 05:33 PM
I have an old baritone that I picked up maybe 20-25 years ago, I bought for about $25. Played it a while in an open banjo tuning then put it away. We had a nasty roof leak a year or so ago that pulled the saddle off. When I started playing uke this year I pulled it out. Wasn't happy about the saddle but one of these days I'll fix it up. Both the G and C strings are wound. It got me thinking what the effects of the increased tension from the two lower strings relative to the lighter tension of the poly strings on the high side of the neck. It would seem to me that the nut and saddle would tend to get excessive wear and corkscrewing might be an issue. Have any of you folks experienced this kind of thing?

saiyr
10-29-2014, 05:52 PM
I took a long time to try out low G tuning and I love it. I regret not going to it earlier. It's mostly Kimo Hussey's fault, I think, with his reasoning. If I weren't so completionist, I could probably get away with only low G, but as it is, I think I'll always have at least one of each.

janeray1940
10-29-2014, 05:55 PM
(I thought sister JR40 had acknowledged that in past threads, actually. But, it's all good).

Ha ha, I can't recall what I said this morning let alone past threads :) But what I'm pretty sure I've pointed out is that one can't really just take any old chord chart or arrangement done with reentrant in mind, slap on a low G string, and play the arrangement as written. Arrangements aren't one-size-fits all - in a uke group, when there's just one arrangement and some players have low G, some reentrant, I'm definitely not a fan of the sound that results.

As for method or style - I don't think I actually have one (nor have I much paid attention the styles of others, really), but I do know that I use my low G uke for ensemble playing, when the low G is taking on countermelody or bass-like rhythm. And at mostly-guitar jams when I'm the only uke, I've found I prefer the sound of low G to reentrant. And for bossa nova, which I haven't much liked on my reentrant ukes at all. Those examples might sort of illustrate your point about method or style making a difference, maybe?

I can see where a professional would need to commit to one or the other - do one thing and do it very, very well. But this whole low G/reentrant debate in the mostly-amateur uke community seems kinda silly to me. It's okay to switch back and forth. Or to stick to one. Or to have a strong preference one way or the other... which, as I pointed out in my previous post, could be subject to change depending on the style of music, or the uke, or even the strings available at any given time.

CeeJay
10-29-2014, 05:56 PM
Neither do I, nor do I understand why one would "hate" one tuning vs. the other. I play both, depending on the situation.

When I first started to try out low G, I made the mistake of always using the non-wound fluorocarbon strings that came in sets - and though I tried several brands, I didn't much care for any of them - which made me think I disliked low G. The non-wound strings seemed floppy to the touch and boomy to the ear. Then I tried a wound guitar string, and it sounded so much better - and I've never gone back to non-wound strings. Turns out it wasn't low G that I disliked, it was the usual string offerings that was to blame.

Nobody ...and certainly not I ,has said that they "hate" one tuning versus the other ......to my knowledge anyway.......this is a bit of a facile discussion in a wayto be honest......;)

It is almost the same as saying to a classical guitarist ..you don't play the guitar properly because you don't also play the electric guitar...

A question was asked by the original poster Low G or High G....I have put my view forward based on really knowing this instrument ...which just seems to elicit a "well,so what ? " response.

Well here is so what ..nicely. Most of the posters on here have only just started playing or have been playing a few years ......they started on the back of the wave of "new" players and the stylings of the new players....I respect the "new" players abilities and skills from a technical point of view....but they leave me cold as to ukelele playing...to me they are playing small guitars.....which, I know is something that ukulele players hate to hear ......I'd rather listen to Hippie Dribble play a tune than Jake Shimanbukuro, because I can relate to Hippies' style...I would rather listen to George Formby than Kimo Hussey......and so forth Smeck beats Hill in my book.

I prefer one style and tuning to the other because I have been doing it longer ..and it is a matter of personal taste and styling ..that's all .....it is not in any way sneering or scoffing and saying one is better ...

I am probably a more competent re-entrant player than I am a fingerpicker.....so why would I go to a low g Tenor or Bari ...which sound awful strummed in the style and manner that I strum them...from my perspective and given previous re-actions to my standpoint on previous similar threads there seems to be no respect or balance given to the two sides of this discussion ...if you come out firmly on one side ...you are classed as a hater.....does not make any sense .....

Put a low g on a ukelele and to me it becomes a small guitar in it's intervals .albeit higher tuned (except the bari of course ...which is 2/3rds git ........I have a guitar, with the advantage of two more bass strings ....so I will use that ....I prefer the soprano/ concert uke because I can control the scale length more effectively ...I like the bark and bite and because it is ,for me ,THE Ukelele ...I am not dissing anybody else for what they play or want to play ...a question was asked ...I answered it honestly ...and seem to have got flack for it ....enough;) ...I am a big boy now ....I know what I like and I like what I know.....

Cheers .....

Ramart
10-29-2014, 06:47 PM
I tend to like slower blues, blues-rock, and ballads, rather than up-tempo tunes, and low-G seems a better fit for my preferred modes. Both my tenors are tuned low-G though I've left a concert uke in reentrant.

However, a few songs I like do sound better to me in reentrant tuning; Cat Stevens' "Wild World" comes to mind as one of those, at least to my ears.

After some experimentation, I've found my preferred strings are a mixed set of Aquila Reds for C-E-A and the flat-wound, nearly squeakless Fremont Soloist for G.

stevepetergal
10-30-2014, 05:23 AM
I go both ways. What? What??

sam13
10-30-2014, 05:30 AM
How many here prefer their ukes in Low G tuning? How many have most or all of their ukes in low G tuning? Why do you prefer low G? Do you have any problems with playing with others or doing most songs if you are in low G?

I've just started playing in low G and now reentrant sounds kind of strange and weak.

I agree with you completely ... except one thing.

I have three Pono Classic Tenors: Two with Low G ... a third re-entrant.

As I play a lot of jazz standards in my own time ... I prefer the extra resonance of the wound 3rd and 4th or the wound 4th only.

But when I hit a uke jam, give me a re-entrant Tenor as I need to cut through the general din of the sound so I can hear what the heck I am playing. I am waiting for some South Coast strings to arrive and will have a wound 3rd on my re-entrant ...

For me ... I prefer South Coast as the Gold standard. It is just IMHO.

wayfarer75
10-30-2014, 06:03 AM
I play both. I like both. Gave me an excuse to buy another uke. What's not to like about that? ;)

kissing
10-30-2014, 06:28 AM
To me, it has been a journey... I've gone back n forth different preferences and different musical styles attributed to each type.

Currently my most frequently played instruments are guitars and low-G tuned ukuleles.
The main reason is that I tend to play a lot of finger-style instrumentals, and for many songs, that low-G is fundamental.

It also allows me to play the same instrumental on the guitar as well, as I go back n forth seamlessly between the two instruments.

That being said, I do keep one uke tuned in high-G.
I really appreciate the different sound that high-G has which cannot be replaced by low-G.

Mim
10-30-2014, 06:44 AM
A lot of my fingerpicking songs like a Low G in order to have a roaming bass note! Other songs I can go back and forth.

seonachan
10-30-2014, 06:53 AM
I have a Kala solid mahogany tenor now strung low G with Living Waters, and a Martin T1K with re-entrant tuning (Martin strings). I couldn't be happier with both of them. I feel that the tunings and strings bring out the best in each - the low tuning really suits the dark, warm sound on the Kala, and ditto in reverse for the Martin. There are some things I play that each is better suited for, and I'm so pleased with them that my UAS is way, way down (it never goes away completely though, does it?)

Laouik
10-30-2014, 09:18 AM
I personally much prefer high G on my tenor, but a low G decidedly has its place. I have an LFdM tenor that was built for low G that I've been playing high G, but Luis is presently building me one tuned for high G so I'll have both. But no savings.

With both, I'll be able to do pretty much everything I want.

Down Up Dick
10-30-2014, 09:39 AM
I personally much prefer high G on my tenor, but a low G decidedly has its place. I have an LFdM tenor that was built for low G that I've been playing high G, but Luis is presently building me one tuned for high G so I'll have both. But no savings.

With both, I'll be able to do pretty much everything I want.

Not on your life! There will always be something else you desperately want. :old:

ichadwick
10-30-2014, 12:42 PM
I have both. Mostly high-G but some songs/ukes sound better with low.

flailingfingers
10-30-2014, 05:26 PM
OK- guess this is a poll of sort so I shall vote: only Only ONLY LOW G. I have 2 ukes- both tenors. Both have Living Waters Low G sets on them. I came from a guitar world so I guess that's the reason. I also play my best uke (Collings UT3-K) 99% of the time. Keeping it simple. This is after my guitar experience over years where I had many, many guitars to the point where I spent more time lusting after a new instrument than learning to play the ones I had well. No more. I love the ukulele. I play every day pretty much. Life is good. In all likelihood it would be just as good playing exclusively high G but that's not where I am. So it goes.

Fred Ukestone
10-30-2014, 05:54 PM
I use high-G because Jake, Aldrine, Eddie V., Gerald, and Tiny Tim use it.:p


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WZOOGU5HxWc

I know, I know, Brittni, Taimane, blah blah use low G. But who cares. lol

I'm trying to imagine Tiny Tim with a low G-string on........no, it's not working! I guess it was the high G-string that enabled him to sing soprano.

Nice playing by the way.

CeeJay
10-31-2014, 03:07 AM
I'm trying to imagine Tiny Tim with a low G-string on........no, it's not working! I guess it was the high G-string that enabled him to sing soprano.

Nice playing by the way.

OOOOeeerrrr Thanks for that ....I have an image in my head that I now cannot get rid of ....involving tiptoeing ...falsetto ...tulips, a
leeeeetle ukulele and a giant hairy...........aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaghhhhhh hhhhhhhhhhhh:wtf:

borealis
11-07-2014, 06:03 PM
Keeping the thread alive...

I use both, but I don't know what I'm doing.

I have two tenors, a Kala tenor that sounds good with both but better with low G, and a Lanikai that only sounds good with high.

I wonder the same thing about string tension as IamNoMan. My first uke, a Mele concert, sounds awesome with a low G but the neck is twisted. Not sure if it's because of the wound string or because I brought it from Maui to a very dry climate in northern Canada.