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WAGAS
09-27-2014, 10:43 PM
We cut horizontally a 60mm thick solid wood by a traditional bandsaw following a paper pattern/drawing to make/design the sides of the uke.
With this process, we make several cuts/sides from biggest to smallest sizes allowable to make a body of a uke. Therefore, we can cut any design for the uke body workable by a traditional bandsaw.

And finally, we believe that we preserved the quality and much of the characteristics of the wood, hence, producing the best quality of sound of our ukes.

https://www.facebook.com/WagasUkuleles (https://www.facebook.com/WagasUkuleles)

Matt Clara
09-28-2014, 03:27 AM
I don't know, those look a little fruity to me... ;) Very cool looking instruments, love to hear one and learn more about the construction methods used.

WAGAS
09-28-2014, 05:03 AM
I don't know, those look a little fruity to me... ;) Very cool looking instruments, love to hear one and learn more about the construction methods used.,

Thank you. With our no-bending process, I managed to create more designs of uke body. Since I am in the wooden souvenir industry for 15 years, I made the uke as a souvenir/decor/gift item and at the same time introducing the ukulele. With this strategy, more and more people learned to love the mighty uke. As I have explained in another post, our no-bending process is our humble contribution in the ukulele revolution. You find more information about us
at https://www.facebook.com/WagasUkuleles

Sven
09-28-2014, 05:37 AM
I'd guess you could save a lot of wood by slicing that block and then bend the slices. And you wouldn't have all that extremely weak end grain going on. But then you wouldn't revolutionize anything and perhaps you'd miss that.

WAGAS
09-28-2014, 05:55 AM
I'd guess you could save a lot of wood by slicing that block and then bend the slices. And you wouldn't have all that extremely weak end grain going on. But then you wouldn't revolutionize anything and perhaps you'd miss that.

Thanks for your constructive opinion.If I may please,if there is anyone you can mention doing this no-bending process, then this is nothing new, hence, you are right that there is nothing revolutionary.

With this process, there is no resistance by the wood itself. Yes, you may consume bigger volume of wood but you save a lot of time in the construction although we produce several uke sideboards in one block. The concern about the weaker grains of the wood, we have applied some special ingredients to make it super strong. But it is worthy to emphasize that you will have more freedom to making a design for the uke body as much as allowed by the limits of a traditional bandsaw. In fact, we have some unreleased collections with more complex designs which we believe could not be constructed using the traditional method. So , we are now mass producing our ukes while maintaining the standard requirements of its quality.

https://www.facebook.com/WagasUkuleles

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
09-28-2014, 06:37 AM
....Yes, you may consume bigger volume of wood but you save a lot of time in the construction although we produce several uke sideboards in one block....
https://www.facebook.com/WagasUkuleles

This is an excellence example of what I dislike about alot of people, and most of the world- the ability to waste natural resources to produce things which don't need to exist and be proud of it.
I congratulate you though on producing fun and enjoyable items over, say, guns, or a more efficient way to FRAK.

Matt Clara
09-28-2014, 07:01 AM
Beau, you assume that he's wasting wood, but he says he's a carver by trade and may very well be using his "leftovers" for other purposes. We don't know.

jcalkin
09-28-2014, 07:10 AM
Orville Gibson cut guitar and mandolin sides out of solid wood blocks back in the 1890s, before he sold the company that adopted his name. The new company quickly gave up Orville's technique for conventional bending of sides.

Guns are at least as interesting as ukes, Beau. Not looking for a fight, just sayin'.

Inksplosive AL
09-28-2014, 08:46 AM
I see no prices and no way to place an order. My interest in anything of this sort (novelty uke) isn't very lasting.

The apples cute and maybe an orange to balance it out but I'll likely never see these again.

Good Luck and some unsolicited advice: Be ready to sell something when you announce you are selling something.

~peace~

Double take: I guess you were not announcing they were for sale after all I'm in the luthiers lounge... heh.

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
09-28-2014, 09:10 AM
Beau, you assume that he's wasting wood, but he says he's a carver by trade and may very well be using his "leftovers" for other purposes. We don't know.

True dat


Orville Gibson cut guitar and mandolin sides out of solid wood blocks back in the 1890s, before he sold the company that adopted his name. The new company quickly gave up Orville's technique for conventional bending of sides.

Guns are at least as interesting as ukes, Beau. Not looking for a fight, just sayin'.

Guns are interesting, as is such things as nuclear fusion and serial killers.

I love going to the local Cabela's and looking at the old guns and the engraving found on them. Beautiful stuff indeed.

Sven
09-28-2014, 09:22 AM
... If I may please,if there is anyone you can mention doing this no-bending process, then this is nothing new, hence, you are right that there is nothing revolutionary.
What? I don't follow you. I said that you would not revolutionize anything by slicing and bending as most of us do. I won't google to find someone else doing it your way.


With this process, there is no resistance by the wood itself.
There is no resistance in the wood after you bend it and it's cooled down. Not if you do it properly.


... The concern about the weaker grains of the wood, we have applied some special ingredients to make it super strong.
Cool! Sounds intriguing.

Seriously, I wish you the best of luck.

Steveperrywriter
09-28-2014, 11:23 AM
I think maybe we are into a thing, where, if I had to guess, I would say the OP is more comfortable in a language other than English. It's my native tongue and I fumble with it, so I'd cut them a little slack ..

WAGAS
09-28-2014, 01:33 PM
Beau, you assume that he's wasting wood, but he says he's a carver by trade and may very well be using his "leftovers" for other purposes. We don't know.

Indeed ,there are no wastes bec we use the smallest parts as decor and/or toy ukes... thanks

WAGAS
09-28-2014, 01:54 PM
What? I don't follow you. I said that you would not revolutionize anything by slicing and bending as most of us do. I won't google to find someone else doing it your way.


There is no resistance in the wood after you bend it and it's cooled down. Not if you do it properly.


Cool! Sounds intriguing.

Seriously, I wish you the best of luck.

We maintain the 2mm thickness of the sides using a bench grinder. We use no linings and directly attach them to the sound boards using a water white clear industrial glue. In a matter of minutes, we produce the body. So, we save time thereby saving labor costs.

Importantly, we can apply the no-bending process to any design workable within the limitations of a traditional band saw.

Thanks for your support, and you have inspired us to do more.

https://www.facebook.com/WagasUkuleles

WAGAS
09-28-2014, 01:57 PM
This is an excellence example of what I dislike about alot of people, and most of the world- the ability to waste natural resources to produce things which don't need to exist and be proud of it.
I congratulate you though on producing fun and enjoyable items over, say, guns, or a more efficient way to FRAK.

Indeed ,there are no wastes bec we use the smallest parts as decor and/or toy ukes... thanks

WAGAS
09-28-2014, 02:00 PM
I see no prices and no way to place an order. My interest in anything of this sort (novelty uke) isn't very lasting.

The apples cute and maybe an orange to balance it out but I'll likely never see these again.

Good Luck and some unsolicited advice: Be ready to sell something when you announce you are selling something.




~peace~

Double take: I guess you were not announcing they were for sale after all I'm in the luthiers lounge... heh.

The retail price for each uke of our Fruit Salad Collection is $ 70.00 US... thanks

WAGAS
09-28-2014, 02:28 PM
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I see no prices and no way to place an order. My interest in anything of this sort (novelty uke) isn't very lasting.

The apples cute and maybe an orange to balance it out but I'll likely never see these again.

Good Luck and some unsolicited advice: Be ready to sell something when you announce you are selling something.

~peace~

Double take: I guess you were not announcing they were for sale after all I'm in the luthiers lounge... heh.

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
09-28-2014, 02:39 PM
Indeed ,there are no wastes bec we use the smallest parts as decor and/or toy ukes... thanks

Cool- your good in my books then :) I wish you all the very best

Kekani
09-28-2014, 07:39 PM
Personally, not sure your builds are revolutionary here. I think guys like Beau, Chuck, Rick, Ken, Pete, Allen, heck I could go on and on with the builder's here that, to me, have not necessarily revolutionized `ukulele (sorry guys), but have opened a world of techniques to my eyes, that I've stolen a bunch of stuff, from a bunch of them.

Cutting a block of wood into shapes - sorry, I think finding wood that big to do that, I'd rather do it another way.

However, kudo's to you for filling a market in your country that may be needed. Suggestion - Uke Talk. Seriously. I'm sure you'll generate some sales there.

WAGAS
09-28-2014, 08:18 PM
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Personally, not sure your builds are revolutionary here. I think guys like Beau, Chuck, Rick, Ken, Pete, Allen, heck I could go on and on with the builder's here that, to me, have not necessarily revolutionized `ukulele (sorry guys), but have opened a world of techniques to my eyes, that I've stolen a bunch of stuff, from a bunch of them.

Cutting a block of wood into shapes - sorry, I think finding wood that big to do that, I'd rather do it another way.

However, kudo's to you for filling a market in your country that may be needed. Suggestion - Uke Talk. Seriously. I'm sure you'll generate some sales there.

Thanks for your opinion on the matter. But I am from a place surrounded by forests, not to mention the super typhoon besetting us last year. We take care of our environment, because it is the source of our happiness like the wood used in building our no-bending ukes. More so, the time spent in the traditional making of ukes is made 10 times or more faster with our no-bending process, hence, more and more people will have access to the mighty uke. Cheers...

By the way, I have uploaded herewith our another collection to demonstrate more about theno-bending process...enjoy!!!

https://www.facebook.com/WagasUkuleles

ericchico
09-29-2014, 04:11 AM
I thinkg this thread is in the wrong spot, maybe move it to Shameless Self Promotion?

Flyfish57
09-29-2014, 05:24 AM
I thinkg this thread is in the wrong spot, maybe move it to Shameless Self Promotion?

There is a lot of self promotion going on in the Luthier's Lounge so what's one more?

Dusepo
09-29-2014, 06:12 AM
This is actually a very common technique. It was used in many medieval instruments but is still used for the Mexican Jarana Jarocha. They even do what you do here and do several sizes from the same bit of wood. I'd love to see you build some of those (and I'd buy one!)

ericchico
09-29-2014, 06:14 AM
There is a lot of self promotion going on in the Luthier's Lounge so what's one more?
Yeah your right, seems like more of a place to showcase your brand lately with the occasional "how to" and "how I did it". Some threads feel like Im reading or watching a commercial.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
09-29-2014, 07:10 AM
Agreed. That's what my web site and Facebook page are for.
Pertaining to the OP's original comments, this process seems a lot harder than just bending the sides. I don't know why so many people are intimidated by the bending process. Once you get it down it's fairly quick and easy. I haven't lost a side in years due to faulty bending. Also, part of the joy in working with nice wood is in making the most of the beautiful grain patterns. I don't think I'd like all that end grain showing on a sawed out uke. But over time we all develop our own unique ways of building and it all seems to work to some degree. There's no better or worse, there are just differences. (Of course I think my methods are the best but I'll keep that to myself! ;) )

Dan Uke
09-29-2014, 07:29 AM
Agreed. That's what my web site and Facebook page are for.

haha...You got your loyal followers that'll post your links for you!! :p

Flyfish57
09-29-2014, 08:39 AM
The Puerto Rican Cuatro is also cut in a similar way...

http://youtu.be/W-CC4-Se-9Q

ksquine
09-29-2014, 01:04 PM
Cebu is a nice place to visit if you ever get the chance....lots of guitar makers around there for some reason. I bought a small classical guitar there a few years ago...its more fun to play with than a regular souvenir
I like the fruit shapes...but the fish shapes are more appropriate. Gimme a nice Lapu Lapu uke any day

Timbuck
09-30-2014, 01:15 AM
I just looked up the "Jarana Jarocha" instrument and found one in the Museum...It's carved out of a solid lump of wood neck and all, and a top glued on it.. not a bad piece of work, Nothing that a bit of Tru-Oil wouldn't fix ;)..I love the phrase "The grace of imperfection" see it here
http://orgs.usd.edu/nmm/PluckedStrings/FolkInstruments/Jarana/14503/Jarana.html

WAGAS
09-30-2014, 02:20 AM
Let us just say that if you want to explore in designing other forms of uke body other than the traditional one, then the no-bending process will be a more useful technique in expressing your new designs within the limitations of a traditional band saw. This is why we have shared our works as depicted on the pictures where traditional bending won't work. Cheers...

WAGAS
09-30-2014, 02:27 AM
I thinkg this thread is in the wrong spot, maybe move it to Shameless Self Promotion?

I think we cannot separate the implications of this thread discussing about a process other than the traditional bending, and at the same time, will inevitably share an impression of self promotion. Hope the reader will take a first impression on the merits of the subject on Uke building over impressions of self promotion.

Kekani
09-30-2014, 07:12 AM
I think we cannot separate the implications of this thread discussing about a process other than the traditional bending, and at the same time, will inevitably share an impression of self promotion. Hope the reader will take a first impression on the merits of the subject on Uke building over impressions of self promotion.

That's a pretty good response. And there are builders that have given you kudo's in doing what you're doing, and have garnered you merits from a self promotion perspective.

I've yet to see a builder provide a good response on merit from a builder's prospective, which is why you posted in the Lounge, yes? Probably the strongest support of your method would come from imitation; something along the lines of,"I'm going to start building that way from now on."

I guess its not only the way you presented your work, but the manner in which you've responded has made this thread seem like you're "selling" us on the benefits of your method, which is why you've received responses like that of ericchico, and why I recommended Uke Talk. Simply because it seems you're here to promote your product.

That's all fine and good. But in the big scope of things, buyers are not here, mostly.

However, its good to see other's builds from time to time, especially one like Allen's recent post, which reminds me of some things I need to get back to from time to time - just focusing on good solid builds. Of course his rosettes are awesome. Must be an Australian thing.

ericchico
09-30-2014, 07:19 AM
I think we cannot separate the implications of this thread discussing about a process other than the traditional bending, and at the same time, will inevitably share an impression of self promotion. Hope the reader will take a first impression on the merits of the subject on Uke building over impressions of self promotion.

Sorry but the frst impression I got was a revolutionary way to build a Uke without bending the sides. Interesting enough to want to read on and then it gets into how you save labor costs, facebook tags, pricing and pics of a brochure for your Uke making company. Thats what gave me the inpression of promotion which Im all for and wish you all the luck. It just seems like you would get better response in another catagory but I could be wrong.

bnolsen
09-30-2014, 10:16 AM
So the next revolution would be to have a CNC machine do pretty much everything with chunks of wood and only need manual labor for assembly and finish.

WAGAS
09-30-2014, 03:21 PM
We use the traditional bandsaw to cut the 60mm depth and 2mm width for the uke body sides. It is really controlled by the hand and heart of the carver.

Inksplosive AL
09-30-2014, 06:20 PM
I'm a working artist myself I carve drawings into skin. A CNC machine will do nothing without someone to program it now will it?

The band saw is being used as a tool nothing more, like a CNC machine in a way. But unlike a CNC machine the band saw will not produce multiple exact copies.

I remember when the first color copiers hit the consumer market, my high school art teacher had trouble with people using this new medium and calling it art. My last day as I walked out of her class for good I pointed out she doesn't even give her pets A's she replied that was because she herself couldn't produce an A. I told her that was her main flaw and until she herself could produce an A she had no right judging young adults and wished her a good life with a choice word starting in F. She really charmed up and became a better person after marriage. My sister got lucky having her then. She got A's.

Point my point hmmm... Don't let Negative Nancy and her sister Belittling Betty question your style. Hell at least in school the teacher was supposed to know something about art. Here you could be worrying about being judged by a parking lot attendant or a pump jockey. hehe

~peace~

WAGAS
09-30-2014, 09:44 PM
Hmmm...the point advanced is to show the percentage of human participation in working with modern machines, and brand the uke as handcrafted. As much as possible, it is of high importance to show the heart of the builder in every craft like the uke. That is the intent, nothing less and nothing more. Shalom...

rar jungle
10-02-2014, 02:59 PM
Wagas, I find your construction method interesting. Thank you for posting about it. I never took it that you were self-promoting, but instead trying to share some new ideas. Your polite replies to the negative responses is admirable. If you follow this forum a lot you will discover that most of the builders prefer tradition over innovation, and they usually react with skepticism and grouchiness to unorthodox ideas. Many of them are seasoned builders, with great knowledge and skill, but with the acquisition of building prowess they have lost their sense of curiosity and wonder at what might be possible. They are to put it more succinctly: old farts.

WAGAS
10-02-2014, 04:31 PM
Wagas, I find your construction method interesting. Thank you for posting about it. I never took it that you were self-promoting, but instead trying to share some new ideas. Your polite replies to the negative responses is admirable. If you follow this forum a lot you will discover that most of the builders prefer tradition over innovation, and they usually react with skepticism and grouchiness to unorthodox ideas. Many of them are seasoned builders, with great knowledge and skill, but with the acquisition of building prowess they have lost their sense of curiosity and wonder at what might be possible. They are to put it more succinctly: old farts.

Thank you very much. In the market of free ideas and action, we continue to journey for new things and discoveries.We intend to mass produce our basically handcrafted ukes made possible by means of our no-bending process. Cheers...

Steveperrywriter
10-02-2014, 06:43 PM
Rar jungle --

I think you are dead wrong. Every one of the builders I have talked to is always looking for a better way to do what they do, and they are no less enthusiast and curious and into taking risks. Newer can be better; however, it is not necessarily so. If experience teaches you that doing something a certain way works or not, then it makes sense that you would use that knowledge. Everybody gets a free pass to touch a hot stove the first time. After that? If you are going to make a sweeping generalization about such things, you might want to do a little research first, since my experience contradicts your comment altogether.

Dan Uke
10-02-2014, 08:17 PM
Sorry but the frst impression I got was a revolutionary way to build a Uke without bending the sides. Interesting enough to want to read on and then it gets into how you save labor costs, facebook tags, pricing and pics of a brochure for your Uke making company. Thats what gave me the inpression of promotion which Im all for and wish you all the luck. It just seems like you would get better response in another catagory but I could be wrong.

Same with most builders! Even though non-builders don't comment here, obviously many check the site and note which ones they like and could eventually lead to a sale. I thing they should charge more for luthiers to post pics here or at least require them to sign up for UU VIP.

Just post all your personal ukes on FB if it's not self promotion on UU

WAGAS
10-03-2014, 02:06 AM
Same with most builders! Even though non-builders don't comment here, obviously many check the site and note which ones they like and could eventually lead to a sale. I thing they should charge more for luthiers to post pics here or at least require them to sign up for UU VIP.

Just post all your personal ukes on FB if it's not self promotion on UU

Revolutionary ideas will most of the times spark attention. Hence, the promotion by itself is only a natural consequence of the new discovery. Peace to all !!!

WAGAS
10-03-2014, 02:15 AM
With all respect, I knew that there were a number of uke builders carving a solid block of wood to form a shell comprising the sideboard and back sound board of the uke body But in comparison to our no-bending process, we horizontally cut the 60mm solid block of wood in 2mm width using a traditional band saw, hence, producing several layers of sideboards from biggest to lowest sizes. On this respect, we call this no-bending process as revolutionary. Thanks...

IamNoMan
10-03-2014, 04:47 AM
I sorta cringe at the prospect of all the fine processed wood that could go to waste here but you cannot make omelets without breaking eggs.

In a similar vein: If life gives you lemons ... make daquiri's. Have you considered making charangos? These bowl lutes are similar in size and shape to ukuleles. When not made from armadillo shells they are carved from wood. They also have large headstocks which could concievably be fabricated from wastage from the bandsaw operation.

Some marketing considerations: Charangos typically sell for the same price as mid priced ukes. They are popular amongst south American and Carribean (read as island), music.
The GGCCEEAAEE octave tuning is not so intimidating to uke player's at least, so there should be little disincentive to "Try one out".

Good luck with your endeavors!

jcalkin
10-03-2014, 05:22 AM
Not necessarily uke related---25 years ago I was looking for a way to make $10 an hour in my shop (subsistence wages even then) while offering an affordable instrument. I had piles of construction grade plywood. I took my best guess at a Style 0 resonator guitar, added a cutaway, and cut it out of a stack of plywood I had glued up. I tried to keep the sides at 1/4" thickness and included the tailblock and a neck block for a Fender-style neck. The sound well was cut out from the chunk of left overs from inside the body. The top and back were of 1/4" plywood. Necks were maple with usually a Honduras rosewood or bocate fingerboard. Top of the line hardware from StewMac was about $200, so I could wholesale to local stores for $400 or retail out of my shop for $500. The necks were lacquered but the bodies were finished in a high-texture paint so finishing time took maybe 1-2 hours, tops. So the build process was something like WAGAS-made ukes. Here are pix. Sorry, but I couldn't figure out how to flip them upright.

The same trick would work for a uke. They say that the top supplies at least 90% of the sound, so if a good top was used instead of plywood it should work fine. I haven't built anything like this in a really long time, but it would still be a fun way for beginners to get into the game or for anyone to stay funky. Just one more use of the WAGAS method.