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Rllink
10-23-2014, 07:10 AM
So as not to hijack the airplane thread, I was wondering how courteous we all actually are? In Iowa, I live in a house, with a front yard and a back yard, a big garage, surrounded by lilac bushes. I can make a lot of noise in my back yard and not bother my neighbors. I could crank up an amp inside and no one would hear me. Sometimes I play on the front porch, which is an open porch, and my neighbors can hear me a little. If I do that, it is usually on Saturday and Sunday afternoons, and my next door neighbor can't hear it, or at least he says he can't The neighbor across the street can, but barely. Regardless, back yard or front yard, I seldom play outside after supper.

In San Juan, I live in a condo. It is a very old building. In fact, it is on the historical register. Windows and doors are normally left wide open to allow for breeze. Everyone hears what everyone else is saying or doing. As I write this I can hear a neighbor somewhere washing dishes. Everyone is very courteous to each other. Many people who have apartments here, live here part time. Doctors, a Coast Guard Commander, a few retired people, and some permanent residents. The point is, there isn't any non professional people living here. Sometimes people allow other people to use their apartments here, and sometimes those visitors get a little loud, but not a lot, and trust me, if that happens, it does not take long for the owner to get the word.

I play my uke in the mid afternoon here in San Juan. Almost every day. Usually there is hardly anyone around at that time of the day. One of my neighbors is actually a drummer, and he practices in the afternoon as well, but I can just barely hear him. He has a special room with acoustic panels that drown out the sound. He is generally done by four in the afternoon, and usually not a sound comes out of his apartment after that. Once in a great while, in the evenings, he will just go nuts down there for five minutes, then nothing. I don't know if he gets a sudden urge or what.

Our condo is very close. Everyone knows everyone. Everyone talks to everyone. But at the same time, I don't want someone to have to come and ask me to keep it down. My point being, in San Juan, I really try to think about my neighbors and try not to disturb them. I understand that not everyone wants to hear lovely ukulele music while they are eating supper or trying to watch TV.

Down Up Dick
10-23-2014, 07:42 AM
I live in a condo too, and I never play anything 'til after 8:30 am. The loud instruments I play in the afternoon. I play my Ukes in the morning usually but mostly anytime during the day. If I play at night, I play my sorprano, but mostly I listen to music. Most of my neighbors work during the day or don't care if I play. It's pretty quiet here, except for me. :old:

janeray1940
10-23-2014, 07:44 AM
I'm almost 50, and I've lived in apartments/small spaces/big cities nearly my whole life. I grew up playing music (badly) in one form or another and was given the example from an early age to ALWAYS be courteous if somebody asked me to keep it down, and to use common sense about when/where to "make noise." And I can count the number of complaints/requests from others to keep it down I've had in my lifetime: two. One in response to playing at 2am when I was still in my teens and had moved to my first apartment, and didn't realize how thin the walls were, and one many years later in my current place when my landlord's kid had a migraine and he said the music was bothering him (as a fellow migraineur, I understand completely!). So I'd say in general I must be pretty courteous about it.

I moved into my current place right around the time I started playing uke again. I share a common wall with my landlord's family in the main house, and then in back there's a 4-unit apartment building with anywhere from 4 to 8 tenants living there at any given time. When I moved in, I told my landlord to please tell me if the music bothered him (he did so only once, noted above); the constantly-changing parade of neighbors in the back building have never made any comments about it so I think it's safe to assume that my uke doesn't carry that far.

I've also had other players over from time to time, anywhere from 2 to 8 people, and every time I do this I let my neighbors know what to expect beforehand and always ask them to let me know if things get too loud. Nobody has ever done so.

The area I live in is densely populated, and there's a big condo next door to my little house. In the summer, I can hear everything from screaming children to dinner parties to phone conversations from the occupants, so I assume they can hear me playing. As I don't know any of the occupants and it's a security building, I haven't given them a heads-up on the occasions that I've had summer uke gatherings, but again - there haven't been any complaints.

So until I hear otherwise, I'm going to assume that I'm (a) being courteous and (b) not bothering anybody. The fact that we've got that big-city isolation thing going on, in which we don't really know our neighbors aside from those on our own property, kind of makes me worry a little that I may at times be a nuisance to somebody and not know it, but hey - if they don't speak up, there's not a lot I can do.

stevepetergal
10-23-2014, 08:09 AM
I honestly believe we Americans can, rather accurately, be described as fearful, distrustful people (think cowardly, narcissistic). For those of us who travel abroad and/or remember a time when it wasn't this way, it's so easy to see.
Sorry, there's nothing I can do about it. But, you won't catch me playing my ukulele on my front porch. If you have the nerve to invade my space by getting so close, you may find me "sighting in" my .357 magnum (if you know what I mean.).

sukie
10-23-2014, 08:12 AM
I remember when I first started playing I was outside practicing. My neighbour -- who lives across the vacant lot from us -- was having new windows installed. The installers were NOT impressed by my playing and snidely said, loud enough for me to hear, "man, she really will need theses new windows". You don't wanna know what I said to myself.

Anyway....I tend to not play outside very often. But, if I am getting ready for UWC or something, I will plug in my amp and open the windows so that anybody walking around the pond can hear me play. It's my way of getting ready, and hopefully get rid of pre-performance nerves. Does it work? I don't think so, but I do it anyway.

I don't play after 8 or 9 PM. Why piss off the neighbours? We are also the kind of people who will let neighbours know if we are having a big party so they can be prepared. Man, they hate when we have garage sales, though.

caukulele
10-23-2014, 08:58 AM
Well, we live in California and rent a small house, and I practice every day. All the homes are very close together, so it is easy to hear the neighbors. I am friends with my neighbors on both sides, and we have a deal that if anyone is too loud we just have to let each other know....Sometimes, I do play outside in the backyard (but only softly) and both sides have told me that they love it...but I do make sure to not play (indoors or outdoors) in the early morning or in the evenings, out of respect for my neighbors. I just want to continue the good relationship we have. One of my neighbors has even started to try and learn the guitar now, because she says that listening to me play made her realize that she wants to play an instrument too...so who knows, maybe someday we will have a neighborhood band...

pritch
10-23-2014, 11:17 AM
My house is older style on a quarter acre so the neighbours aren't too close. The one nearest my living room is a shift worker: twelve hour shifts; two days, two nights, then four days off. Unless I see him around I have no idea where he's at in his schedule so I try to be quiet. Mostly I manage not to accidently activate the car alarm. Mostly! The living room doors and windows are closed when I practice. There is a verandah which I plan to use on summer evenings, perhaps to enjoy a glass of something cold, but not to practice.

I have mentioned the various instruments to both neighbours and they said they have never heard them, so I can practice quietly any time. Using the amp would be different but I'd use 'phones if I thought there'd be a problem.

At the back of my section there is a protected tree, as I write this the staff from the local council are here doing some maintenance work on the tree, and felling some competing trees. As well as chain saws they have a big machine out front that turns trees into mulch and that thing is seriously noisy. There must be nobody for hundreds of yards around that can't hear this. We'll all be pleased when peace returns... ;)

Rllink
10-23-2014, 11:37 AM
I honestly believe we Americans can, rather accurate, be described as fearful, distrustful people. For those of us who travel abroad and/or remember a time when this wasn't this way, it's so easy to see.
Sorry, there's nothing I can do about it. But, you won't catch me playing my ukulele on my front porch. If you have the nerve to invade my space by getting so close, you may find me "sighting in" my .357 magnum (if you know what I mean.).No, I don't know what you mean. Why would you feel threatened to play your uke on the front porch, and who would invade your space? I'm not trying to be confrontational, I just don't understand what you are saying.

IamNoMan
10-23-2014, 12:36 PM
Courtesy is a way of reducing tensions in a group to a level below the "Big Stick" philosophy endorsed by stevepetergal. It is a fundamental right of Americans to "the pursuit of happiness". People are happy when they are within there comfort zone. If you intrude into this "bubble" people become unhappy. This intrusion can take many forms. Physical proximity is one form. Different people and groups have differently sized bubbles. City folks, (group), tend to have a very small bubble. That is you have to get very close to them to be "In Their Face". Some people and groups don't have a bubble. Policemen don't generally have a bubble. It is an asset in their line of work. Policemen's family members tend to have little or no bubble either because they are in the same group. The key here is to understand every group has their own set of values and etiquette. Courtesy is how we deal with people who are not within our own group.

America is a heterogeneous amalgam of cultures, ethnicities and traditions with many, many groups. Courtesy becomes a very malleable thing in a place like America. Many who have responded to this thread thus far are in the group: "condo-dwellers". I live in a village and noise and privacy values you condo-dwellers have are very different from country values. Country values include acknowledging other folks in passing, whether you know them or not. (This most certainly is not a city dwellers value or courtesy) In the country or city if you don't want your neighbors to intrude pull your shades. In the city or the country sitting on the porch or stoop and playing your uke invites your neighbors to participate; Even if only to say please stop. Playing the Banjo on the porch or playing the Ukulele on the beach are American Icons. BTW if you see a country person sitting on the and openly displaying, (not cleaning), their firearms they are emphatically saying the shades are pulled. Ain't that right Steve?

It is not surprising to me that a group like UU has established a set of standards of etiquette as regards where it is appropriate to play or not play Ukulele. That is courtesy to others. Tolerance of other groups or individuals values is also courtesy. Tolerance is a value that Americans as a group need to work on.

Rick Turner
10-23-2014, 01:27 PM
Is it discourteous to point out an egregious spelling error in the title of this thread?

It's amazing how often folks do this here and elsewhere on Internet forums. Maybe spell check doesn't work on thread titles, but it does in this txet. (intentional, just checking...and it worked...)

Radio Flyer
10-23-2014, 01:36 PM
it is discourteous to misspell, especially courtesy.

haole
10-23-2014, 01:48 PM
I play uke, guitar, didgeridoo, etc outside all the time. I live in a residential neighborhood where the houses are very close together and there are obnoxious dog owners on all sides of me. People seem to think it's totally cool to leave their two or three untrained dogs out all day and night so they just bark incessantly and snarl at you through the fence, so if anyone complains about my music I really don't care anymore. :B Courtesy is dead here, but I'm thankful that passive-aggressiveness prevails over threatening people with a gun in these parts.

Ukejenny
10-23-2014, 01:57 PM
The loudest thing I play is my clarinet, and I can't play it late at night without waking my kids, so I don't play it late at night. We have a nice sized yard, so my playing doesn't bother the neighbors. We play our ukuleles out by the pool, or in the front yard and I doubt if anyone can even hear it. Probably the loudest thing we do is splash around late at night during the summer.

Rllink
10-23-2014, 02:09 PM
Is it discourteous to point out an egregious spelling error in the title of this thread?

It's amazing how often folks do this here and elsewhere on Internet forums. Maybe spell check doesn't work on thread titles, but it does in this txet. (intentional, just checking...and it worked...)No, I don't find it discourteous, but I do think that it is pretty obvious without being pointed out. But yes, it is an "error" and I did not do it on purpose. As soon as I posted it I thought, crap, I wonder how long it is before someone points that out. I'm sorry, and I understand if you do not wish to participate in the the post because of the error in the title.

Radio Flyer
10-23-2014, 02:27 PM
i replied Because of the error, to err is human and it's nice to see other humans. grab a uke and smile!!

Freeda
10-23-2014, 02:36 PM
I have great neighbors. I also have 3 dogs. It is about an equivalent to the guy two doors down having like a million kids. And the teens next door shoot bottle rockets at each other and yell Harry Potter spell words at each other. And the guy across the street raised hunting hounds before he died....

Everyone has their own thing going on. And no one else cares.

IamNoMan
10-23-2014, 03:01 PM
We all need to come to accommodation with our neighbors; But what about in public? If it makes you happy and doesn't hurt anyone try it. If people complain gracefully desist.

Two weeks a year my wife and I go to Bethany Beach for her vacation. We have access to a 5th floor condominium 50 yards from the beach. Due to severe disability issues I cannot walk on the beach or swim in the pool. I bought my uke the day we went down to the shore this year. I join Susan at the pool with banjo or uke. Susan had some courtesy concerns, (which she didn't mention at the time)!

I sang, played the banjo and a little uke. Were there any complaints? Well there was one. A guy requested a song I didn't know. Another guy, 4 years old requested Libba Cotton's "Freight Train". He sang along, hanging to the side of the pool. I asked him were he learned the song from. He said he learned it from a Grateful Dead Album.:)

itsme
10-23-2014, 03:56 PM
But what about in public?
I think it really depends. Then again, I still get annoyed by people who answer their phone in the checkout line and proceed to chatter loudly, like no one else can hear them.

Let me ask you this... at the pool, if someone had brought a boom box and started playing rap music (or any style of music you don't particularly care for), would you have thought it was okay? Some people hang out by the pool to enjoy the sun and silence, maybe read a book or something.

I'm not knocking playing in public, just playing devil's advocate. You can't judge someone else's tastes and say rap sucks and it's an intrusion, but ukulele is cool (in my mind) so it's okay to impose it on people.


I sang, played the banjo and a little uke. Were there any complaints? Well there was one. A guy requested a song I didn't know. Another guy, 4 years old requested Libba Cotton's "Freight Train". He sang along, hanging to the side of the pool. I asked him were he learned the song from. He said he learned it from a Grateful Dead Album.:)
I think you had a couple really nice encounters. Especially the kid. That's amazing. Maybe you should encourage him to take up the uke, tell his parents you'll teach him some. He sounds like a real musician in the making. :)

Rick Turner
10-23-2014, 05:22 PM
No drum circles! That used to be a curse upon my fair town.

gyosh
10-23-2014, 06:08 PM
No drum circles! That used to be a curse upon my fair town.

LOL!


Only in SC!

ricdoug
10-23-2014, 06:20 PM
I honestly believe we Americans can, rather accurate, be described as fearful, distrustful people. For those of us who travel abroad and/or remember a time when this wasn't this way, it's so easy to see.
Sorry, there's nothing I can do about it. But, you won't catch me playing my ukulele on my front porch. If you have the nerve to invade my space by getting so close, you may find me "sighting in" my .357 magnum (if you know what I mean.).

We have an acre and a half with a lot of fruit trees. We do not disturb our neighbors with music and we always ask if we are planning a party if it's OK with them. We always invite them to be polite. We do not play music after 6PM. We both have Ruger SP101's in .357 Magnum on the end tables and are fully trained on when and how to use them. Ric Douglas USMC, Retired

ricdoug
10-23-2014, 06:25 PM
Is it discourteous to point out an egregious spelling error in the title of this thread?

It's amazing how often folks do this here and elsewhere on Internet forums. Maybe spell check doesn't work on thread titles, but it does in this txet. (intentional, just checking...and it worked...)

Yes it is. Spelling Nazi's should only debate a post, never the spelling. I have found personally that those that argue spelling, do it to disagree when they have no other ammunition. Spell checkers are a crutch. Ric

WCBarnes
10-23-2014, 06:27 PM
My house is located on 7 acres so there is not much risk of any neighbors hearing. My wife on the other hand has joked that she goes to sleep and wakes up to the strumming of a uke. I try to practice in a different room, or outside, to give her a break.

In public, I am not too shy about bringing my uke along and strumming. My daughter's soccer practice, when my dad was in the hospital, local park. I don't strum loudly and it is more to pass the time than anything. I have not had one person speak negatively or ask me to stop (I surely would if aproached). In fact more times than not people come up and talk to me about it and tell me how much they like the sound. I generally offer to let them give it a go and occasionally they accept.

IamNoMan
10-23-2014, 07:25 PM
Let me ask you this... at the pool, if someone had brought a boom box and started playing rap music (or any style of music you don't particularly care for), would you have thought it was okay? Some people hang out by the pool to enjoy the sun and silence, maybe read a book or something.

I'm not knocking playing in public, just playing devil's advocate. You can't judge someone else's tastes and say rap sucks and it's an intrusion, but ukulele is cool (in my mind) so it's okay to impose it on people.


I think you had a couple really nice encounters. Especially the kid. That's amazing. Maybe you should encourage him to take up the uke, tell his parents you'll teach him some. He sounds like a real musician in the making. :)To me a public place is common ground. It is for everyone's use. I am big on Toleration and Inclusivity. If some one was playing music I didn't care for I would let them. I might even join in or organize an impromptu jam session or swap. My music is not played loud. It is not meant to be intrusive. I do not judge or criticize other people's tastes. They have as much right to be there as I do.

When I see someone is reading at the pool sooner or later I will ask what they are reading. Perhaps a discussion will ensue or I will find out about a good book. No one objects when you take an honest interest in what they are doing. In the case of the solitude seeker it is their obligation to notify me of their intent. I wouldn't know if they didn't tell me. And I would honor desire for quiet.In so far as playing the Devil's Advocate goes; That's OK by me; but if it isn't broken it doesn't have to be fixed. You are right; it was a nice encounter; but then 95% of my encounters with people are nice. BTW if the kid or his parents asked me to teach them music or anything else I would probably do so. For me to initiate that type of interaction would be intrusive.

@ Ric Douglas: Thank you for your service. Semper Fi.

TheBathBird
10-23-2014, 08:07 PM
Interesting reading this thread as a Brit. I can totally relate to what's being said about needing to consider neighbours (in general I think our houses and gardens are a lot smaller), and tolerance (I try, honestly!); the guns, and 'playing by the pool', not so much... :)

The Big Kahuna
10-23-2014, 08:21 PM
We both have Ruger SP101's in .357 Magnum on the end tables and are fully trained on when and how to use them

People throw their arms in the air at some of the things I say, yet hardly a soul bats an eyelid when shit like this gets posted. How is it even remotely relevant or appropriate to a discussion on courtesy, to bring up the fact that "hey, we have guns, and we'll shoot you if you f**k with us!"

kohanmike
10-23-2014, 08:24 PM
My way of being courteous while playing my uke in public is during the group classes/play-alongs I attend twice a week. When the leader wants to teach a lick or someone asks a question, I stop playing, unlike a good number of the members who just keep strumming, loudly I might add, so that the leader and/or member cannot be heard talking. I find it to be very discourteous.

IamNoMan
10-23-2014, 09:15 PM
I was wondering when the Brits would make an appearance here. Welcome. Courtesy is intimately tied to tradition and culture. Few folks across the big pond have any appreciation for the American firearms tradition. It has to be most disconcerting. Americans, including those who dislike guns are familiar enough with the tradition that such discussions are not shocking, even if they view them as in poor taste. My oldest possession is a Peterson Briar I paid 2L and a Bob for in Bath when I was a teenager. I doubt there are many here who can relate to that in anyway. I expect most Brits, even those born after 1971 understand what I'm saying. I wonder how our friends Down Under relate to these traditions. Possession of fire arms was outlawed in what 2002? In PA where I live people discharge their firearms in public on various holidays. It's illegal, but it's part of our culture and not even law enforcement officials get upset by it. In England the tradition is that not even the Bobbies are permitted firearms. (I don't know if that is still true)? I am also wondering if There are any Haitians here at UU. I suspect they might take offence when the hear the Drums being discussed in public.

TheBathBird
10-23-2014, 09:50 PM
Haha, we've just woken up, IamNoMan! Good morning :) What you say is interesting, and I'm sure true. You're right, our policemen don't routinely carry firearms and I always find it slightly unsettling when they do (at airports for example). I think my son's favourite bit of our trips to France is seeing the Gendarmes with their guns at border control. I must admit I do find the casual references to firearms a bit shocking, but as you say, cultural differences.

KaraUkey
10-23-2014, 10:17 PM
Yep. You're right the government in Australia bought all of our firearms back and destroyed them. I grew up on a farm, had air rifles as a kid and owned at least a .22 rifle most of my life. Right up until I sold it to the government in fact. As I walked in to hand it over, I saw they were just being immediately destroyed, so I at least removed the scope, which I still have. As kids on the farm we were taught responsible gun use at a very early age. The last thing I used my rifle for was to put down a badly injured rabbit (hare actually) at the request of my neighbour who had just run over it. Rarely ever saw hand guns of any kind here other than those carried by police and security.

I still live in a rural area though not a farm. Nowadays you can go for years here without hearing a single gun shot.

greenie44
10-24-2014, 01:49 AM
I used to live in a tenement building on the lower East Side of New York City - a historic dump. I lived underneath David Peel, who some of the older folks around here might remember as a street musician. David made his later albums in his apartment, and they were loud punk rock albums. Sometimes he could come down and knock on my door and ask if I could be very silent as he was recording, and I always complied.

I didn't mind his music, so I almost never asked him to turn it down, or off. The few times I went up to knock on his door (during a pause) the music stopped immediately, and for good. And I complied by only knocking when I really needed something other than overpowering chords in my head. David was a sweet guy.

Flashing forward 35 years, I recently hiked to the bottom of the Grand Canyon and took my uke. One afternoon I was playing with my hiking pals at a table between cabins, and some hand slammed shut the cabin window next door. Oh well, everyone is a critic.

Sporin
10-24-2014, 02:16 AM
I don't generally play in public except for music events (open mics, jams, etc.). There is someone on my wife's commuter bus who practices his ukulele all the time and I know she finds it mildly annoying but she doesn't stop him or anything, she just puts on her headphones. It's his right to do that, and if he can't pick up the social cues that everyone captive on the bus isn't entertained, then... well... so be it.

We live in a neighborhood so I'm conscious of how much noise I make at home. Most days though, I feel pretty free to do most anything I want within reason. Even plugged in, my ukulele isn't crazy loud, certainly no louder than my lawn mower or snowblower or anything else I might be doing. I don't play on my front porch (steps, really) because I'd have half a dozen little kids up there bothering me. :) On a sunny afternoon I might sit in my backyard and play but it's very quiet overall.

I have a good relationship with my neighbors, and over the last 14 years no one on either side has every asked the others to be quiet because everyone respects each other enough to both A. Make noise at reasonable times of the day, and B. Live and let live.

The neighbor on one side is a musician, so we'll occasionally shoot the breeze if I'm playing outside and he notices over the hedge. I spent a lot of years listening to him learn to play drums so it's all cool. The neighbor on the other side (retired guy) has had a string of Harley's and hot rods so he's made his share of noise. No one complains because no one is blatantly disrespectful to each other. Having to "put up" with someone else's noise just means they have to "put up" with yours occasionally.

I remember when Harley guy put up a shed of questionable aesthetic ;) and my wife wondered if we should say something. I gave her a flat "no." It's his property, he can do what he wants on it. Plus, if I want to put up an ugly shed on my property, I would be unhappy with him complaining to me. And he never would. It's the old Vermont yankee way... you mind your business, I'll mind mine. If either of us wanted someone telling us what we can and cannot do with our homes and yards, we'd live in an HOA neighborhood.

CeeJay
10-24-2014, 03:11 AM
People throw their arms in the air at some of the things I say, yet hardly a soul bats an eyelid when shit like this gets posted. How is it even remotely relevant or appropriate to a discussion on courtesy, to bring up the fact that "hey, we have guns, and we'll shoot you if you f**k with us!"

Well,BK it was said courteously I suppose...but I do agree ....say something remotely ironic , teasing ,or bantering and you are called a hater....perhaps us UK dwellers are not so comfortable around ordnance.

Still, country ways for country folk, as The Pub Landlord observes.....Courteously.........;)

haole
10-24-2014, 03:42 AM
People throw their arms in the air at some of the things I say, yet hardly a soul bats an eyelid when shit like this gets posted. How is it even remotely relevant or appropriate to a discussion on courtesy, to bring up the fact that "hey, we have guns, and we'll shoot you if you f**k with us!"

Totally with you, man. I would rather live next door to a Creed tribute band that practices at night with bagpipes and thumpin' bass than folks who casually toss around the idea that they'll blow your head off if you go near 'em. Not being political either. That's an issue of courtesy too.

Rllink
10-24-2014, 03:57 AM
Interesting responses. I can't believe that we've gotten into a bit of a discussion about guns, I have guns too by the way, but when I was writing this I was thinking of where one lives, as in house or apartment. I have taken my uke to the park and played it several times, and I guess that I didn't even think about whether it might bother the other people in the park. So that is something for me to think about. I have not done this yet, but here in San Juan, I live a few blocks from the wall, built in the 1500s that surrounds Old San Juan. It overlooks the ocean and I've been thinking of taking my uke out there and sitting on the wall. I'll have to think about that a little more. I think in that there, if I put out the hat, you could make the case that it is busking out there, as there is a lot of foot traffic along the wall between the two old forts that guard the island. I don't know.

DownUpDave
10-24-2014, 03:59 AM
Totally with you, man. I would rather live next door to a Creed tribute band that practices at night with bagpipes and thumpin' bass than folks who casually toss around the idea that they'll blow your head off if you go near 'em. Not being political either. That's an issue of courtesy too.

Yea.........this thread went sideways and got real creepy really fast. Seriously, someone saying they will blow someone away for playing ukulele on their front porch.

I am outta here

Rllink
10-24-2014, 04:04 AM
Yes it is. Spelling Nazi's should only debate a post, never the spelling. I have found personally that those that argue spelling, do it to disagree when they have no other ammunition. Spell checkers are a crutch. RicIt does not bother me. I'm pretty comfortable with the idea that I'm not perfect, and being reminded of it does not put me off. At one time I worked a night shift, and I had to keep a log for the day shift. I had a guy who would come in at shift change and read my log. He would point out all my errors. I used to accuse him of being obsessed with the insignificant, but really, he made me look good, so I appreciated it.

CeeJay
10-24-2014, 04:08 AM
Hmmm, playing outdoors on a casual basis is not something that I think many in the UK would consider ...doing it as a licenced (or otherwise) busker or at a pre-planned event ,well yes..but we may be a bit too self-repressed, sensitive or worried about a negative re-action to just whip out the uke ...or anything else for that matter....instrument wise I mean...oo-er.:rulez:

sukie
10-24-2014, 04:11 AM
Yea.........this thread went sideways and got real creepy really fast. Seriously, someone saying they will blow someone away for playing ukulele on their front porch.

I am outta here
I would like to think that poster was kidding.

Lest people not from America think all Americans like guns. You would be wrong. I abhor them. All of them.

Back on track......
Rllink.....I was in San Juan last winter. Had I seen/heard an ukulele player on the wall I would have been in heaven and I would have come up and said hi and tried to talk ukulele.

There is courtesy and then there is courtesy....know what I mean? If somebody lives 5 feet from the neighbour, yes, we should think about the noise we make. If we are in un-squished public places there should be some leeway. It is not my nature to go to a park and play my ukulele. But why shouldn't somebody do that? Standing in line for a movie and playing? Maybe not so much.

sukie
10-24-2014, 04:13 AM
Totally off track again, but not really.....

Some people can spell and some people can't. Who really cares? Does the intent get made? Usually.

Courtesy says not to bring it up.

igorthebarbarian
10-24-2014, 04:24 AM
Interesting thread (the gun thing would be an interesting side thread about worldwide cultural differences; this forum is a rare and great opportunity for most to interact with foreigners and get different viewpoints)
Back on topic though I don't think the uke carries that far, unless you're really strumming hard or amped up loudly. Most of us are afraid of pissing off our neighbors and afraid of confrontation.
I think of my brother who played drums in high school band and had a full drum set - feel sorry for the neighbors. But he wouldn't play after dinner.
Something like a banjolele or actual banjo (w/ picks) would probably carry a longer ways
As for playing on the wall in San Juan, man, that sounds beautiful and perfect. Tgat sounds like what your uke was meant for. Do it!

Sporin
10-24-2014, 04:28 AM
In a big, open, public park, I see nothing wrong with playing your uke. People go their to enjoy the outdoors, surely the sounds of children playing is as loud as someone quietly plucking away on a uke. You have as much right to use that public space to entertain yourself as they do, right?

Now, if you find a wide open park and go sit down on the same bench as someone quietly reading and start playing, then you are certainly imposing, whether they say anything or not. So much of this thread really is about "reading the room" and taking social cues. If you find yourself wondering "is this ok?" then you probably realize that it might not be, and you should act accordingly. We live in a world where many people seem to lack self-awareness (talking loudly on phones in the store, etc.).



As for the gun stuff, it has no relevance in this thread, and I'm baffled as to why various folks felt compelled to tell us that they have firearms, and which ones specifically they are. :uhoh:

Rllink
10-24-2014, 04:35 AM
Interesting thread (the gun thing would be an interesting side thread about worldwide cultural differences; this forum is a rare and great opportunity for most to interact with foreigners and get different viewpoints)
Back on topic though I don't think the uke carries that far, unless you're really strumming hard or amped up loudly. Most of us are afraid of pissing off our neighbors and afraid of confrontation.
I think of my brother who played drums in high school band and had a full drum set - feel sorry for the neighbors. But he wouldn't play after dinner.
Something like a banjolele or actual banjo (w/ picks) would probably carry a longer ways
As for playing on the wall in San Juan, man, that sounds beautiful and perfect. Tgat sounds like what your uke was meant for. Do it!Well, one of my goals was to be a street performer, and I wanted to do it here in Old San Juan. Also, it is so far out of my comfort zone. But I have since had people, my wife included, sort of infer that street musicians are just panhandlers with a different spiel. So now I have this big complex about it. But I posted a thread on that some time ago and of course, uke players think differently. But regardless, I'm a little apprehensive about just going out busking. But there are two things. First of all, I could be a street performer who doesn't put out the hat so to speak. I don't think that I need the couple of dollars that I might get from people passing by. I could just give my music away. That would be nice. The other thing is the San Sebastian Festival in January. I live on Calle San Sebastian, and during the festival street performers are on every corner. I could busk right outside our front gate. So right now, I'm thinking of breaking the ice at the San Sebastian Festival.

strumsilly
10-24-2014, 04:48 AM
Taking a cruise in DEC. and PR will be one of the stops. Let's meet at the wall and jam [safety in numbers]
I know it's against cruise ship policy, but I've taken a uke on every cruise [at least a dozen] . Even on crowded boats there are out of the way places where I've sat and played. Never had problems, and actually had a few compliments. if anyone ever complained, I'd stop.I play and sing softly on board.

PS.And speaking of courtesy, my pet peeve is people loudly yaking away on their phone in a restaurant when you are trying to enjoy a meal. Unless I'm on the phone.

Rllink
10-24-2014, 05:17 AM
Taking a cruise in DEC. and PR will be one of the stops. Let's meet at the wall and jam [safety in numbers]
I know it's against cruise ship policy, but I've taken a uke on every cruise [at least a dozen] . Even on crowded boats there are out of the way places where I've sat and played. Never had problems, and actually had a few compliments. if anyone ever complained, I'd stop.I play and sing softly on board.

PS.And speaking of courtesy, my pet peeve is people loudly yaking away on their phone in a restaurant when you are trying to enjoy a meal. Unless I'm on the phone.When are you in San Juan? I would love to jam on the wall with you, but I'll be in Iowa with my family for the holidays. I'm usually here in October, then back to the states for Thanksgiving and Christmas. After Christmas we come down here and stay until the middle of April or first of May.

actadh
10-24-2014, 05:31 AM
I was not courteous in my youth when playing recorded music in my parents house or at my first apartment.

I am not always courteous in my car when playing radio//CD//Sirius music. As with when on my kickscooter and playing Pandora, I figure I am moving past quickly enough that it is a momentary irritation. Neither activity - driving and scooting - is good for headphone use

I live on two acres with a river running in front of my house, so no neighbors there. Neighbors on the left have an empty lot between us. Neighbors on the right have two lots between us. Strumming inside is fine as I can't be heard outside - according to my husband when he comes home while I am playing.

Even with all that space outside, though, THEY CAN HEAR ME when I play my acoustic ukulele outside. It is amazing how much sound travels on the riverbank where I live. I can clearly hear the neighbors on the other side of the river at times. If I play outside, it is during the week when everyone is at work.

hoosierhiver
10-24-2014, 05:53 AM
No drum circles! That used to be a curse upon my fair town.

I'm with you there. One of the only UWC rules.

The Big Kahuna
10-24-2014, 11:16 AM
http://i.imgur.com/uQg4I.jpg

pritch
10-24-2014, 12:08 PM
My oldest possession is a Peterson Briar I paid 2L and a Bob for in Bath when I was a teenager. I doubt there are many here who can relate to that in anyway.

That took me back. Peterson was my father's choice for many years until he quit.

Handguns are strictly controlled in this country and the Police have them "available" but don't normally wear them. Their union currently wants to change this. That would worry me as their skill level generally is not great. My most modern example holds 13 rounds of 45ACP., the security requirements are such that I couldn't get at it in a hurry or without making considerable noise...

Since consideration is the topic, the club does not shoot on Christmas day or at other times that might upset the neighbours.

Rick Turner
10-24-2014, 12:23 PM
re. "IamNoMan"'s comment "but it's part of our culture"...

There are a lot of things that have been and continue to be part of some group's culture that are either immoral, amoral, stupid, obsolete, or wisely illegal. Try female genital mutilation, slavery, head-hunting, cannibalism, human sacrifice, and torture of prisoners for the top of the heap. All of these have been deemed to be culturally acceptable at one point...several...most?... seem to still be going on. So I just don't go for "our culture" as being a very valid reason for anything that is beyond question and is OK.

Shooting guns in the air...now that one is really stupid. What goes up comes down, and yes, a falling bullet can kill, has killed, and will kill again. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celebratory_gunfire

A falling uke, however, is another matter. Not sure what terminal velocity is.

estreya
10-24-2014, 12:48 PM
The Big Kahuna ... i'm guessing many readers are appalled by the casual and incongruous gun references on this thread (interesting timing, as well, since there was yet another school shooting today). Don't mistake the lack of open outrage as acquiescence.

Rick Turner - good post.

SteveZ
10-24-2014, 02:06 PM
Courtesy is as subjective a subject as one can have. Is it tolerance to other's social and cultural norms? Is it putting up with one's neighbor, even if the neighbor's attitudes and opinions are 180degrees from your own? Or is it expecting your neighbor to condone with what you believe is "civilized behavior" regardless of their social and cultural norms?

The "gun" references don't bother me at all, as the context was understood for what was meant.

These forums cross a lot of national borders where laws, history and beliefs are not only different internationally, but often quite different intra-nationally. Compound that with the fact that English is the predominate language. However, there are many dialects within the English language, and slang, colloquial sayings, analogies and specific definitions often are different among the dialects. The fact that we all just read text devoid of body language and voice inflection impedes true understanding of the printed message.

In keeping with the topic, I now defer to my forum neighbors...

itsme
10-24-2014, 03:03 PM
In keeping with the topic, I now defer to my forum neighbors...
This thread has gotten so off-topic in general that I suspect it will get closed soon.

Politics and heated discussions about guns and such aren't why most of us come here, and I don't think that's what the OP intended.

Rllink
10-24-2014, 04:24 PM
This thread has gotten so off-topic in general that I suspect it will get closed soon.

Politics and heated discussions about guns and such aren't why most of us come here, and I don't think that's what the OP intended.The OP says that I like it when something takes a life of its own. I'm not a controlling person. I say, ride it out. But then, it probably isn't my call.