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mkatz
11-01-2014, 03:41 AM
I am loving my new MB and was wondering what type of hard shell cases people would suggest if I wanted to upgrade from the Uke Crazy case that it came in.

Mitch

Tigeralum2001
11-01-2014, 04:01 AM
I've tried Protec which is very nice and sturdy, but I find it heavy. Heavy enough to make me only want to use it for local trips. The last time I traveled via air, I took it in the Uke Crazy and that worked great. Light and strong. Perhaps that is why it is Chuck's default case?

mm stan
11-01-2014, 04:10 AM
Aloha Mitch, I love the Crossrock abs cases..
@cj I think chuckie ' s cases are the Oahu cases

sukie
11-01-2014, 04:19 AM
Mine came in a Uke Crazy case. But it was a tenor case and he made me a super concert. There was need to cushion the lower part of the ukulele. I found my ukulele fit perfectly in an Oscar Schmidt case. And I love it. I am pretty careful so it works for me.

I do believe though, that Chuck does recommend getting a better case. I don't know how to link stuff, but Wicked Wahine recently got a MB and on one of her threads (I think) there is discussion about it.

wickedwahine11
11-01-2014, 04:27 AM
The Crossrock case is quite nice - but I prefer backpack straps so I sold mine. I use two different cases for my Moore Bettah. I have a Kamoa fiberglass I use locally and on trips that don't involve flights - very lightweight, and a Calton custom case for flights - better protection but pricy. The Calton is also fairly heavy - hence not using it locally.

I would recommend an Ameritage or the Crossrock. The Calton is great - my fave overall - but the Ameritage is almost as protective at a fraction of the price. And the Crossrock is quite nice and light.

Here is the thread Sukie mentioned - I review the Kamoa, Ameritage and Calton in it.
http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?49937-The-case-on-cases-Calton-Kamoa-Ameritage-Kamaka

Cornfield
11-01-2014, 05:47 AM
I am loving my new MB and was wondering what type of hard shell cases people would suggest if I wanted to upgrade from the Uke Crazy case that it came in.

Mitch

Ship your MB to me and I'll find the perfect case for it. It might take me awhile though.

mkatz
11-01-2014, 06:38 AM
Ship your MB to me and I'll find the perfect case for it. It might take me awhile though.

I may have to take you up on this offer!

Mitch

Doc_J
11-01-2014, 06:52 AM
The Uke Crazy should be fine. My tenor came in an Oahu case, which is also nice.
Ameritage cases provide great protection, but are really heavy.

Dan Uke
11-01-2014, 08:51 AM
Any case should be fine. it doesn't have a "unique" shape where only certain cases will work.

RichM
11-01-2014, 10:37 AM
Calton cases are really the best that I've seen, but they are very expensive. Well worth the money if you are willing to invest in a case at that level. I also have both the Kamoa and Crossrock cases, and like them very much-- I haven't seen the Kamoa for sale for a long time, but the Crossrock is still made.

Steveperrywriter
11-01-2014, 12:03 PM
I'll put in a plug for Hoffee cases again. Cost as much as Caltons, but pretty much bulletproof. Heavy, but if you want protection, this is right up there, you can even get a built-in GPS a tracker ...

wickedwahine11
11-01-2014, 12:34 PM
Calton cases are really the best that I've seen, but they are very expensive. Well worth the money if you are willing to invest in a case at that level. I also have both the Kamoa and Crossrock cases, and like them very much-- I haven't seen the Kamoa for sale for a long time, but the Crossrock is still made.

Yeah I like my Calton a lot but it was crazy expensive. The Kamoa would be perfect for me for local use if it had a storage compartment. I still like it locally for the weight but have to carry stuff in my purse.


I'll put in a plug for Hoffee cases again. Cost as much as Caltons, but pretty much bulletproof. Heavy, but if you want protection, this is right up there, you can even get a built-in GPS a tracker ...

Yeah the Calton has a similar system but I didn't pay to activate it. The Hoffee are really nice though.

mm stan
11-01-2014, 02:21 PM
The Crossrock case is quite nice - but I prefer backpack straps so I sold mine. I use two different cases for my Moore Bettah. I have a Kamoa fiberglass I use locally and on trips that don't involve flights - very lightweight, and a Calton custom case for flights - better protection but pricy. The Calton is also fairly heavy - hence not using it locally.

I would recommend an Ameritage or the Crossrock. The Calton is great - my fave overall - but the Ameritage is almost as protective at a fraction of the price. And the Crossrock is quite nice and light.

Here is the thread Sukie mentioned - I review the Kamoa, Ameritage and Calton in it.
http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?49937-The-case-on-cases-Calton-Kamoa-Ameritage-Kamaka
Aloha staci, my Crossrock case has latches for back straps, granted it is a hard case too and may not be
Comfortable carrying on your back as a reunion case

mm stan
11-01-2014, 02:26 PM
I am still waiting for a manufacturer to come up with a case with a tracking chip

mkatz
11-01-2014, 03:28 PM
The Uke Crazy should be fine. My tenor came in an Oahu case, which is also nice.
Ameritage cases provide great protection, but are really heavy.

The problem I have with the Uke Crazy case is that when you stand it on its side, the hinges hit the ground and it leans to one side. I do have a Reunion Blues gig bag which is great for travel but not so much for the house and around town. I am thinking the Crossrock may fit the bill.

Mitch

dkcrown
11-02-2014, 01:28 AM
I have to vote for Ameritage. While they are heavy, they do what they are supposed to, provide excellent protection for my MB. And pricewise while they are expensive, they are not exorbitant and you really get what you pay for. They are beautifully made and very classy visually. A Cadillac of a case for my Rolls Royce of a uke.

tangimango
11-02-2014, 01:42 AM
Crossrock case super nice. Also the kanilea case on hms is really high quality.

HBolte
11-02-2014, 02:38 AM
I am still waiting for a manufacturer to come up with a case with a tracking chip

My MB has an RFID chip that Chuck embedded for me. http://www.snagg.com/microchip-retrofit-kit-five-pack

mm stan
11-02-2014, 03:13 AM
My MB has an RFID chip that Chuck embedded for me. http://www.snagg.com/microchip-retrofit-kit-five-pack
Wow that is what I need on my next mb for sure thank you, H

sukie
11-02-2014, 03:40 AM
wow that is what i need on my next mb for sure thank you, h

next????? :-d

wickedwahine11
11-02-2014, 05:51 AM
My MB has an RFID chip that Chuck embedded for me. http://www.snagg.com/microchip-retrofit-kit-five-pack

The RFID chip comes on the Calton, but you have to pay to activate it. I didn't because I figured a thief could always sell the uke or take it out of the case. But if I could get Chuck to embed one, I would absolutely do that. Is it something that you think could be added on post-build?

coolcow
11-02-2014, 06:27 PM
My MB has an RFID chip that Chuck embedded for me. http://www.snagg.com/microchip-retrofit-kit-five-pack

wow a tracking chip!! that's something new to me.....I think I need a tracking chip for my MBs too

Patrick Madsen
11-02-2014, 07:37 PM
Me too; would love to add a tracking chip.

wickedwahine11
11-02-2014, 07:47 PM
Looks like a bunch of us would love to add that chip to our ukes. :)

hawaii 50
11-02-2014, 08:06 PM
Looks like a bunch of us would love to add that chip to our ukes. :)

if you want to add a GPS tracking device in your case....check out this website

www.tempocases.com

wickedwahine11
11-02-2014, 11:17 PM
if you want to add a GPS tracking device in your case....check out this website

www.tempocases.com

Thanks Len but my case already has the RFID chip (though I did not pay to activate it). I am just one of the folks that would like to add it to the uke itself - like HBolte did. ;)

HBolte
11-03-2014, 02:19 AM
Here is mine being installed: 72539

wickedwahine11
11-03-2014, 03:40 AM
Here is mine being installed: 72539

Nice! That is a great idea. Thanks for the photo - it does lend me to believe it may need to be done when the uke is built. Kudos to you guys for thinking of it. :)

RichM
11-03-2014, 04:36 AM
Here is mine being installed: 72539

Absolutely wonderful idea! I hope other high-end instrument builders are considering this technique.

Rick Turner
11-03-2014, 04:52 AM
Bear in mind that RFID devices are not GPS tracking devices. The instrument would have to be scanned by an RFID reader/scanner which has to be pretty close ( 2" to 3" says the literature ) to activate and read the chip. Think of them as being permanent serial numbers, not Lo-Jack trackers.

Joe Viellette and Harvey Citron used to embed cut out aluminum foil serial numbers between wood laminations in bass and guitar bodies. They could be read on an X ray screen.

Rick Turner
11-03-2014, 04:57 AM
You could get this:

http://www.retrievor.com/small-and-lightweight-gps-tracking

Dan Uke
11-03-2014, 06:26 AM
You could get this:

http://www.retrievor.com/small-and-lightweight-gps-tracking

Thanks for sharing this. After losing our dog this April, I am going to seriously consider something like this for our new pup. I love my ukes but doesn't compare to losing a family member.

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
11-03-2014, 06:35 AM
Unless your a gigging professional, or have $$$ to spare, for the cost of a custom Carlton/Hoffee cases (about $800 I think) you would be better off buying a new $800 uke and travelling with it anywhere from Antarctica to Hawaii.

That said, those Carlton and Hoffee cases look great...but they should at that price.

Steveperrywriter
11-03-2014, 07:59 AM
Hmm. But if you buy an $800 uke and the first time you hit the road it gets crushed by the airlines, then you have to buy another uke. You can see this might get expensive pretty fast should it happen again ...

If you are going to spend money on a top-of-the-line-one-of-a-kind custom uke and you have plans for serious travel, which in my mind involves the big metal birds, then you want the case to protect the instrument. We have all seen the horror story pictures of instruments that were murdered by baggage handlers who were probably extras in Gorillas in the Mist. A high-end case seems like the best insurance that your cherished instrument will survive the trip. Won't keep it from being stolen, but that GPS is a nice notion ...

Truth is, if I were having to travel with my in-progress custom uke, which, by the way, has a gorgeous, unique headstock like nothing I have ever seen before, I'd probably buy it a seat and strap it in next to me ...

Rick Turner
11-03-2014, 08:09 AM
I have a Reunion Blues leather heavily padded gig bag for my koa Compass Rose tenor. When I fly, it's carry-on, and I've flown with it at least ten times with no problems. It's about a $350.00 case for a $3,500.00 uke, and I do not worry about it at all. I also do not intend to sit on it.

Steveperrywriter
11-03-2014, 08:47 AM
If you can carry it onboard a plane, the level of protection necessary is much less than if it must be checked. In a recent flight somewhere I had to go, I took a half-size classical guitar. Bigger than a tenor uke, but no problem on the main leg of the flight, they let me stow it in the overhead; however, when I caught the feeder jet from the big airport to the smaller one, the guitar had to be gate-checked. It was an inexpensive instrument and in so-so case, and it wasn't going to have to go though the carousel when we landed, it would be waiting at the gate, but it still made me nervous. I can't imagine the level of anxiety I'd feel with a an irreplaceable instrument in anything less than a sturdy case.

Might be a belt-and-suspenders approach, and a lot of folks here have traveled to the ends of the Earth without any problems with their instruments, checked or carried on; still, I suspect it only takes just the one time having a uke crushed to ruin your whole day. (If it happens to you, Rick, at least you know where you can get another Compass Rose tenor at cost ...)

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
11-03-2014, 09:10 AM
Truth is, if I were having to travel with my in-progress custom uke, which, by the way, has a gorgeous, unique headstock like nothing I have ever seen before, I'd probably buy it a seat and strap it in next to me ...

I will be sure to hand deliver your uke on a foggy night at midnight on my winged unicorn surrounded temple virgins throwing rose petals at our feet. If I can't find virgins (it is Oregon), would you except bearded luthiers?

Steveperrywriter
11-03-2014, 09:39 AM
I will be sure to hand deliver your uke on a foggy night at midnight on my winged unicorn surrounded temple virgins throwing rose petals at our feet. If I can't find virgins (it is Oregon), would you except bearded luthiers?

Yeah, that'll work for me. If you put it in a good case, of course. Unicorn travel is pretty bumpy ...

mkatz
11-03-2014, 11:24 AM
Thanks for all of the responses. I am really looking for something around the house and local and went ahead and ordered a Crossrock. As I said earlier, I have a Reunion Blues for airline travel.

Mitch

Kamanaaloha
11-04-2014, 10:05 AM
Ameritage - for high end ukulele (DeVines come in these)

Kamaka - (their cases are pretty good...and should fit...shop around for a great price...the one I got from Easy Music...was priced really good...
Ko'olau/Pono/Oahu - similar to Kamaka case

Not familiar with crossrock cases...but they look good and should be since they are almost double the Kamaka/Oahu ones...

UkeInTW
11-05-2014, 04:46 AM
How about a tenor uke? Will some airlines make you check those in too? Internationally I have been able to carry my tenor onboard, but not sure on the shorter flights on smaller planes, if people ran into problems and were forced to check in.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
11-05-2014, 06:25 AM
The RFID chip comes on the Calton, but you have to pay to activate it. I didn't because I figured a thief could always sell the uke or take it out of the case. But if I could get Chuck to embed one, I would absolutely do that. Is it something that you think could be added on post-build?

A chip can easily be installed at anytime. It can be epoxied in an inconspicuous area or even drilled into the neck block and hidden.

wickedwahine11
11-05-2014, 06:32 AM
A chip can easily be installed at anytime. It can be epoxied in an inconspicuous area or even drilled into the neck block and hidden.

Ooh, sending you an email! :)

mkatz
11-05-2014, 01:23 PM
When I am not playing it, my MB is now resting comfortably in a new Crossrock case that fits it perfectly. I bought it from Andrew and the service was great.

Mitch

caukulele
11-05-2014, 01:26 PM
So Mitch, do you think you might be posting a video soon? I am so curious to hear your lovely concert.....

dnewton2
11-06-2014, 02:46 AM
I am not sure I get the chip thing in the uke. Well I guess more specifically with a uke that is so unique like any MB. Most of the ukes I see Chuck building now have some sort of inlay that is specific to that uke. I dont see every uke he is building lately. Since you need to scan the chip for the info that would mean you or someone would have to have it in your hands. I doubt a pawn shop or second hand buyer is going to scan for a chip in an instrument. Whouldn't you be able to prove it was yours and stolen without scaning a chip? Even my Not so Basic uke is unique to any othe MB i have seen.

Can someone help me understand how this is an extra level of protection?

OP, I use the case Chuck sent mine in. I really have not found any markings of a maker/brand. It is a hardshell black case with a green velvetish lining. I did aquire my MB in 2009, so I am sure Chuck has used several different cases through the years.

wickedwahine11
11-06-2014, 04:34 AM
I am not sure I get the chip thing in the uke. Well I guess more specifically with a uke that is so unique like any MB. Most of the ukes I see Chuck building now have some sort of inlay that is specific to that uke. I dont see every uke he is building lately. Since you need to scan the chip for the info that would mean you or someone would have to have it in your hands. I doubt a pawn shop or second hand buyer is going to scan for a chip in an instrument. Whouldn't you be able to prove it was yours and stolen without scaning a chip? Even my Not so Basic uke is unique to any othe MB i have seen.

Can someone help me understand how this is an extra level of protection?

OP, I use the case Chuck sent mine in. I really have not found any markings of a maker/brand. It is a hardshell black case with a green velvetish lining. I did aquire my MB in 2009, so I am sure Chuck has used several different cases through the years.

A GPS would be better but the smallest I could find was the size of four quarters, cost $300 and had a battery that lasted three years. For $16 (on Amazon), I ordered a Snagg RFID that is as small as a grain of rice. I would not bother shipping my uke to Chuck to install it but I would drive to him if I am in Hilo, or would have had him install it during the build if I thought about it.

Plus, I have similar microchips implanted in my cats. Again GPS would be better but the microchip is better than nothing.

Take what they say with a grain of salt (or in this case, rice) but this is Snagg's statement.

"When your prized possession is missing, every minute counts! In order to maximize recovery chances in case of theft or loss, SNAGG has developed a simple and efficient recovery process. The SNAGG recovery rate of 35% is the highest in the industry and has caught the attention of insurance companies offering discounts for SNAGG-equipped assets.

Recovery Process:

1.The owner of an item protected by a SNAGG microchip files a police report and an officer and case number are assigned.

2.The owner notifies SNAGG and forwards the police report information.

3.SNAGG releases a complete file on the asset including photos (if provided by owner) to pawnshop associations, all second-hand recovery officers in every major city in the U.S. as well as posting a loss or theft alert on SNAGG.com.

4.When a suspected instrument is located, the police contacts SNAGG and SNAGG immediately sends a scanner (usually via overnight mail) to legally identify the item. RFID identification technology is recognized as unalterable proof of ownership by the U.S. legal system and law enforcement agencies.

5.After ownership is verified, the item is then returned to the legal owner. Court appearance and costly travel are not required to release the asset.

Recovery Facts:

1.Recovery rates of assets not protected by SNAGG are reported by law enforcement at 0.03%. SNAGG statistics from our web site database show an average recovery rate greater that 35%, or almost 1,200 times more! Since law enforcement officers are overworked they welcome and appreciate the SNAGG microchip system which makes the recovery process easier. Prior to SNAGG technology – which provides specific description and photos - recovery of lost or stolen assets was virtually impossible.

2.Police reports filed without SNAGG only circulate within the city or, at best, the county of the filing. According to police associations, most stolen items wind up far from the location where theft occurred. They are are then re-sold in all impunity because there is no record of them being stolen at the location they end up being offered for sale.

3.SNAGG has a recovery rate vastly greater than any system ever devised. This fact is recognized by insurance companies across the United States and they offer discounts for items protected by SNAGG microchip technology.

4.Police second-hand recovery associations have requested speakers from SNAGG at their yearly conventions to explain the technology and recovery systems offered by the company."

dnewton2
11-06-2014, 05:49 AM
Thanks wickedwahine. I can see the benifit somewhat now, mostly with the distibution of the information to all the cities/agencies. Other than that maybe the unalterable proof of ownership.

Hope no one ever needs to use it but I can see a sense of added protection might help some for these high end instruments.

Rick Turner
11-06-2014, 06:06 AM
There's another point of view:

How many folks here actually have their ukes stolen from them? As a builder, I can tell you that of the (approximately) 3,800 guitars, basses, and ukes I've built under the Turner, Renaissance, and Compass Rose names, I can only recall hearing of three being stolen.

I understand the "ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" thing, but if you take reasonable care, loss of your instruments to theft is pretty low on the list of hazards. You're far more likely to sit on, drop, scratch, drop something upon, etc. your uke than to have it stolen unless you are really careless about where you put it or you're in a very high crime area.

Ukulele Eddie
11-06-2014, 06:32 AM
There's another point of view:

How many folks here actually have their ukes stolen from them? As a builder, I can tell you that of the (approximately) 3,800 guitars, basses, and ukes I've built under the Turner, Renaissance, and Compass Rose names, I can only recall hearing of three being stolen.

I understand the "ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" thing, but if you take reasonable care, loss of your instruments to theft is pretty low on the list of hazards. You're far more likely to sit on, drop, scratch, drop something upon, etc. your uke than to have it stolen unless you are really careless about where you put it or you're in a very high crime area.

I'm with you on this one. Additionally, it would have to be discovered by somebody who even thought to see if it had a chip in it. So, it won't help with recovery. Sure, it might help you prove it's yours, but so will pics and receipt.

Rick Turner
11-06-2014, 06:40 AM
We stamp serial numbers deep into the peghead tip of each uke we make. Someone would have to do some pretty serious and obvious damage to the uke peghead to get rid of the number, and that right there would be the tip-off that it had been stolen. We do keep a serial number log book that indicates where the uke is going as well as having a work order system with a separate unique number for each instrument as well. Unfortunately, our bookkeeping program does not allow searching by customized fields...serial number or work order number...but our hand kept log takes care of that.