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Lost_Chord
11-04-2014, 02:02 PM
A couple years ago I bought a guitar and gave it up after a few months. I loved the sound but was uncomfortable with the size of the instrument (playing it and transporting it). About a week ago I stumbled upon somebody playing a ukulele on Youtube and it rekindled my interest in a stringed instrument.

So after several hours of learning about them and listening to the differences I ordered:

1) a Cordoba 22C Concert Ukulele
2) Aquila 8U Nylgut Concert Low-G Tuning Ukulele Strings
3) Fender FT-004 Chromatic Clip-On Tuner by Fender
4) Ukulele For Dummies

And, I've found a lot of stuff on the internet for beginners.

Of course, I only thought about searching for a forum AFTER I ordered everything.

Please tell me I made a wonderful choice. Please.

Another reason for a stringed instrument is to teach me chords. I play the trumpet and flugelhorn too.

Nickie
11-04-2014, 02:09 PM
First, welcome to UU. I can't play guitar, either. My 1st concert sized uke was a Cordoba, I loved it. As long as it is "set up" properly, you will probably really enjoy it.
You can't go wrong with Aquila strings on most Cordobas. I use them on all of my ukes now.
I hope you get a kick out of it, and come here often to waste time and catch UAS! And show us pics of your new uke, and if you have the equipment, make us a video of your first song!

ohmless
11-04-2014, 02:30 PM
welcome to UU!

I have been plunking for a bit over a year now with my Cordoba and am still happy with the instrument. Mine was the lower line model 15cm with the laminate top. I will forever keep it as a road uke if I ever play outside the house. At the 100$ floor price, it had the most resonance and YMMV. If I remember correctly I kept the original strings on it as they were already Aquilas.

I seriously entertained this model for quite some time to upgrade my daily player to a solid top rather than a laminate. I even drove two hours round trip to play and contrast it with other ukes in the 200 dollar bracket. Granted I didn't look at more expensive ukes than 250 dollars, but I was markedly impressed with both this uke you ordered and with a couple Ohana sopranos. It is due to my desire to plug in that I want to get an electric Ohana(already saving up), but I certainly can say you won't be dreadfully disappointed(it is a winner in my books.) At the worst it will need exchanged or a set up.

When I first started out, it was with youtube tutorials and after 3 weeks of that I wanted something more regimented and borrowed the Ukulele for Dummies from the library. I then spent a good two weeks with this book and recommend it without hesitation.

You did good!

IamNoMan
11-04-2014, 03:07 PM
I recently bought my second uke. On my purchase trip to the store I played a Cordoba. My ear loved it. My fingers loved the neck design. I almost bought it but by that time I had horsetraded the price of another uke my ears really liked to an offer I couldn't refuse. You will really really like your Cordoba.

UkerDanno
11-04-2014, 04:50 PM
You made a great choice...well, except for the low G. ;-D

igorthebarbarian
11-04-2014, 05:03 PM
You made a great choice...well, except for the low G. ;-D

Haha agree. Well played. But coming from guitar the low G will be more familiar. cordobas are good value. Not sure if you got it from HMS but they do great setups on cordobas.

Lost_Chord
11-04-2014, 06:10 PM
I bought an extra set of strings with a low G just to try it.

Lost_Chord
11-05-2014, 12:19 PM
What do you guys mean by getting it 'set up'? I assumed I'd be able to tune it and play.

Doug W
11-05-2014, 12:40 PM
Things involved in a setup:

String height from the frets to the bottom of the string:
Height of top of 1st fret to bottom of string
Height of top of 12th fret to bottom of string
height of nut
height of saddle
compensation of saddle (in some cases)

If some of these are off, you will find that even though you have the uke properly tuned and chords sound fine in 1st position, as you move up the frets to play chords, they will be off.

You can check your intonation by playing an open string. Then play the same string while fretting the 12th fret, then check the harmonic at the 12th fret. These should all be the same note, just at different octaves. If one of these sound flat or sharp compared to the others, your intonation is off. Repeat this with each string.

If things are off, they can be fixed.

ohmless
11-05-2014, 12:51 PM
ukes are like anything else made in a factory. there are acceptable tolerances and lemons that fall through the cracks. Some buzzing can be caused by unlevel fret wires. Part of a set up is to file these to close to flat relative to each other. My cheaper cordoba was fine. Hope your's is too. If not you have to compare the price of a set up done locally to a return/exchange. Now I have played for nearly a year and only go up the neck past say the 6th fret only when finger picking on the first string(the A string). In other words, depending on the location of the buzz, you might just not be effected with the buzzing and can get a set up later rather than sooner.

ubulele
11-05-2014, 06:13 PM
You made a good choice, particularly in opting for the better model with a solid top. But ensure it stays humidified if you live in a dry climate. And I second what others have said: spring for a setup—it makes a big difference in playability. Factory ukes are almost always shipped with overly high action (easier to lower it than to raise it), and they don't take care to ensure the frets are optimally level. Also consider getting a uke thong, so holding the uke is less of a problem while you're trying to learn to play it.

bonesoup
11-06-2014, 01:02 AM
Of course, I only thought about searching for a forum AFTER I ordered everything.

Haha, how many times have I done this too? Excitement takes over. But in your case I think you did fine. To my ears, I kinda prefer the Cordoba sound in that price range.

Lost_Chord
11-06-2014, 01:43 AM
In case it needs to be set up, can you recommend a place to send it? I live in a town of 4,000 people in SW New Hampshire. (The big city, 8 miles away is 22,000 people.) I kinda doubt there are any uke specialists around here.

kkimura
11-06-2014, 03:32 AM
In case it needs to be set up, can you recommend a place to send it? I live in a town of 4,000 people in SW New Hampshire. (The big city, 8 miles away is 22,000 people.) I kinda doubt there are any uke specialists around here.

Try Strings and Things in Concord. Or Maple Leaf Music in Brattleboro, VT if that's closer.

DaveY
11-06-2014, 04:55 AM
In case it needs to be set up, can you recommend a place to send it? I live in a town of 4,000 people in SW New Hampshire. (The big city, 8 miles away is 22,000 people.) I kinda doubt there are any uke specialists around here.

To add on to kkimura's suggestions: Keene must have music shops, as it's a college town. And if you want to take a road trip, I recommend Luthier's Co-op in Easthampton, MA. It's probably over an hour from you, but it's a cool artsy/funky/unpretentious downtown, and maybe you could hang out there while they do the work. (No, I don't work for the Chamber of Commerce.)

Lost_Chord
11-14-2014, 05:33 PM
... Maple Leaf Music in Brattleboro, VT ...

Thanks. Going tomorrow. It's just across the CT River from where I live.

kkimura
11-15-2014, 02:29 AM
Cool, let us know how it comes out.