PDA

View Full Version : I Am NOT a Music Snob!



JJFN
11-05-2014, 02:36 PM
Good Evening Everyone, I like all types of music, from the classics to rap. Tonight while messing around I started playing some jazz tunes. I have to say these are some beautiful melodies with lush chord changes. Again I am not a snob. However when you compare some pop/rock tunes to jazz, they just don't stand up. As beautiful as the simplicity of a tune like Yesterday is, play Come Rain or Come Shine and see the difference. I guess what I am trying to say is that there is beauty in all genres of music, from the simple to the complex tunes. Also playing jazz tunes on my Kamaka Bari, low g, with Southcoast LL-NW's really helps. That's my rant for tonight. Have a great night. Dirk, you can send the check to my home address. LOL LOL!!

bunnyf
11-05-2014, 02:47 PM
I too am a lover of many genres, simple to complex and am also struck by the beauty of some more complex jazz-based pieces and some old-timey songs with their pretty diminished chords. I haven't played much Jazz on my uke, but now that you mention it, I'm going to break out my bari and start with "Come Rain or Come Shine". thanks

janeray1940
11-05-2014, 03:00 PM
It probably makes me a music snob, but - I'm in complete agreement with a statement attributed to Duke Ellington:

"There are two kinds of music. Good music, and the other kind."

Waterguy
11-05-2014, 03:13 PM
I bring you a quote from Tad Williams.

“A teenage girl creaming while she listens to some boy-band, a monk digging on the God he hears in Gregorian chants, or John ****ing Coltrane himself climbing up into the sky on a staircase made of sixteenth notes, it's all the same. If it takes you there, it's good.”

Anyone who does not agree with that fits my definition of a music snob.

You asked for this when you posted.

IamNoMan
11-05-2014, 03:23 PM
I bring you a quote from Tad Williams.

“A teenage girl creaming while she listens to some boy-band, a monk digging on the God he hears in Gregorian chants, or John ****ing Coltrane himself climbing up into the sky on a staircase made of sixteenth notes, it's all the same. If it takes you there, it's good.”

Anyone who does not agree with that fits my definition of a music snob.

You asked for this when you posted.I totally agree with Waterguy and I am a music snob. Everyone should be allowed to enjoy the types of music they enjoy, without having to hear kvetching about the types of music the other person doesn't enjoy.

ksiegel
11-05-2014, 04:57 PM
I'm a snob.

If it is too loud, I don't like it.

If it is too quiet to hear, I don't like it.

If the words are so garbled I can't understand them, I don't like it.

If it is Opera, and involves a Soprano or Tenor solo, I generally don't like it.

If it is tedious and boring and repetitive, well ... you get the picture.

But Peter Schickele always quoted Duke Ellington as saying "If it sounds good, it is good." That's why I support Opera on my local NPR station- Just because I don't care for something is no reason for it to not be heard. I'm a snob, not a censor.



-Kurt

ohmless
11-05-2014, 06:09 PM
This year I have really loosened up and am listening to newer pop/dance that I never would have considered in the past. I count on the seasons for inspiration also.

Still can't figure out why anyone would listen to Bruno Mars music but to each their own. Just not my groove. I could look at the bright side and at least it is not as bad as "Anaconda". Thankfully just about all of my music that I listen to is on demand or my private collection, so will never hit that link again out of curiosity...

greenie44
11-05-2014, 06:13 PM
Sorry, gotta disagree. There is an assumption here - more complexity/nuance = better.

That certainly doesn't mean that jazz, or any other music, isn't good. But to say that a 3 chord (or 2 chord) song cannot be a rich, meaningful and fulfilling experience is just wrong.

If that's not what you were saying, my apologies in advance.

Peterjens
11-05-2014, 07:42 PM
However when you compare some pop/rock tunes to jazz, they just don't stand up. As beautiful as the simplicity of a tune like Yesterday is, play Come Rain or Come Shine and see the difference.
You chose one song in the Beatle library for your argument. Lennon and McCartney wrote many complex songs. A google search "technical analysis of Beatles songs" lists many results. The first hit for me was "Hard Day's Night" and it contains multiple paragraphs on just the opening chord that is familiar to many.
BTW, Sir Paul pays homage to early popular music and jazz on his Kisses on the Bottom album. His father, it is reported, was a jazz bandleader and was influential to Paul. A Rolling Stone article wrote the following - "McCartney’s writing always had old-school flavor: "When I’m Sixty-Four" and "Martha My Dear" evoked vaudeville; "Yesterday" echoed Nat "King" Cole’s style." Give the album a listen if you haven't heard it.

Dan Uke
11-05-2014, 08:32 PM
Typically when you start any sentence with I am not a ". " means you are. Hahaha

Kimosabe
11-05-2014, 08:51 PM
If you can quickly figure out any three chord song, any four chord song, any twenty chord song, and reharmonize any song and write a counter-melody in a variety of styles, then perhaps you are entitled to prefer music that is more challenging, or you might just like the beauty of something simple. Might depend on your mood.

A gentleman tends to be discreet in forwarding his tastes; don't you think?

Sabantien
11-05-2014, 09:15 PM
Sorry, gotta disagree. There is an assumption here - more complexity/nuance = better.

That certainly doesn't mean that jazz, or any other music, isn't good. But to say that a 3 chord (or 2 chord) song cannot be a rich, meaningful and fulfilling experience is just wrong.

If that's not what you were saying, my apologies in advance.

I agree with this one. And the Tad Williams quote above too.

We certainly all have tastes and things we prefer, but I think it would be rather boring if we all liked the same thing.

Someone once told me Coldplay is so good because their music is so complex. You know, it might be complex. But to me it's boring as all buggery. More complex doesn't make it more interesting. Well, unless you're into that sort of thing. Tori Amos's Me and a Gun is incredibly strong and moving and has no music at all. Probably not much chop as an instrumental though.

Redeyejedi
11-05-2014, 09:15 PM
i'm hella a music snob. i hate all that wak shit.

RAB11
11-05-2014, 11:41 PM
The gentleman doth protest too much, methinks.

Good to see you back Jono.

CeeJay
11-05-2014, 11:49 PM
Well, you got Ukelele snobs ...you might as well bring on the music snobs......


What makes me laugh about this is that the music could not give a flying four letter word...it's all about people and their attitudes toward other people ....sad really..


and to just lighten the mood.......Jazz...a music art performed to about three people using hundreds of chords........Rock/Blues/Pop ..a music art performed to hundreds of people using three chords......:biglaugh:


Here's another ...make one mistake whilst playing ..nobody may notice....make the same mistake twice , whoops, you may have been noticed ,do it again and call it jazz.....

Rich Hall "A Jazz ensemble sounds like a Blues Band playing whilst falling down the stairs".........

..and I actually do like a bit of Jazz now and again......not necessarily to play on the uke....Dougf can do that and I'll listen.....:o

CeeJay
11-06-2014, 12:16 AM
Good Evening Everyone, I like all types of music, from the classics to rap. Tonight while messing around I started playing some jazz tunes. I have to say these are some beautiful melodies with lush chord changes. Again I am not a snob. However when you compare some pop/rock tunes to jazz, they just don't stand up. As beautiful as the simplicity of a tune like Yesterday is, play Come Rain or Come Shine and see the difference. I guess what I am trying to say is that there is beauty in all genres of music, from the simple to the complex tunes. Also playing jazz tunes on my Kamaka Bari, low g, with Southcoast LL-NW's really helps. That's my rant for tonight. Have a great night. Dirk, you can send the check to my home address. LOL LOL!!


I think this was the really important line perhaps ??:biglaugh:

Jon Moody
11-06-2014, 02:24 AM
Good Evening Everyone, I like all types of music, from the classics to rap. Tonight while messing around I started playing some jazz tunes. I have to say these are some beautiful melodies with lush chord changes. Again I am not a snob. However when you compare some pop/rock tunes to jazz, they just don't stand up. As beautiful as the simplicity of a tune like Yesterday is, play Come Rain or Come Shine and see the difference. I guess what I am trying to say is that there is beauty in all genres of music, from the simple to the complex tunes. Also playing jazz tunes on my Kamaka Bari, low g, with Southcoast LL-NW's really helps. That's my rant for tonight. Have a great night. Dirk, you can send the check to my home address. LOL LOL!!

When you make broad assumptions like "...compare some pop/rock tunes to jazz, they just don't stand up." and state you're not a snob, you kind of are.

A good piece of music will transcend time, genres and players. Listen to Van Morrison's "Brown Eyed Girl" and then listen to Everclear's version. Listen to the version of Metallica's "Master of Puppets" from the S&M album, specifically the breakdown in the middle; most of that was grabbed off the original recording. To get really current, listen to the Postmodern Jukebox cover of "All About that Bass."

There are definitely "clunkers" out there, but you can find those in every genre and in every era. There was a lot of music I listened to in my Music History classes in college that, when compared to other more popular works of that time, was apparent why they didn't last. But broad generalizations are just that.

PhilUSAFRet
11-06-2014, 02:45 AM
Here's a scraper for the doo doo you just stepped in:

------]

VegasGeorge
11-06-2014, 02:53 AM
Afraid I AM a music snob. I think Barbara Streisand sings flat a lot of the time. It makes me clench my teeth. I think all of Frank Sinatra's stuff from middle age onward just stinks. I actually try to get away from it. I firmly believe that Post Modern Jukebox's move from New York to Los Angeles is going to ruin the group. Dennis Brain is still the only Horn player I care to listen to. And, I get more out of listening to Iz's recordings than I do from Jake Shimabukuro's. Maybe i just have particular tastes in music. Being classically trained, I can appreciate and understand complicated music. But, my childhood was in New Mexico, and I learned to love music listening to country being played out Jukeboxes in the bars my parents would frequent. Back then, they allowed kids in those places. I still think Patsy Cline is best female vocalist I've ever heard.

CeeJay
11-06-2014, 02:56 AM
I think all of Frank Sinatra's stuff from middle age onward just stinks.

Thank God it is not just me then ....sorry ..I think he was better actor than a singer...some songs he nailed ...some he nail gunned .......

SteveZ
11-06-2014, 02:58 AM
Music Snob (def.): A person who can listen to the William Tell Overture by Gioachino Rossini and not think of The Lone Ranger.

Note: For those too young to remember black-and-white television, The Lone Ranger was a popular weekly TV Series starring Clayton Moore and Jay Silverheels.

JJFN
11-06-2014, 03:06 AM
That is all you had to do to pass Music Appreciation. Listen to the Tell Overture and not shout " Hi Yo Silver". LOL

ukulelekarcsi
11-06-2014, 03:12 AM
I like to listen to lots of music, but can't help resenting some. I think that 's what defines the 'snobbery' here: resenting or looking down on some music, rather than having a narrow range of musical taste. I can enjoy country, r 'n b, gammelan, highlife, hungarian folk, French punk and quite heavy metal. But there is some particular kinds of music I can't stand at all, and I don't really know why. The Doors always wind me up and get turned off by me. Celine Dione, the poor lass, also doesn't stand a chance on our radio.

But I'm quite certain about one thing that has been suggested here. It has absolutely nothing to do with old/new, complex/simple, harmonic/rhythmic, loud/quiet, fast/slow preferences. I do acknowledge to have personal preferences, mainly for old, complex, rhythmic, and yes please loud and fast music. It still doesn't explain the resent.

Fashion? Well, Celine could be explained that way, but the Doors are certainly 'hot' or 'cool' with most music lovers.

Perhaps it's some strange case of incidental learning? I once had a professor of learning psychology, who was disgusted by apples, because in his childhood he once had become sick after eating too many of them and then riding a rollercoaster.

greenie44
11-06-2014, 03:35 AM
This quote is long overdue in this thread -

"We like both types of music - country and western"

VegasGeorge
11-06-2014, 04:21 AM
Well, music needs lyrics, and good lyrics are (is?) poetry, so without further ado:

"The Sky," by John Wayne

The sky is blue
The grass is green
Get off your butt
And join the Marines!

Just thought I should throw that in here for good measure.

IamNoMan
11-06-2014, 04:32 AM
"The Rum Tum Tugger is a Curious Cat".

I like to listen to lots of music, but can't help resenting some.

But I'm quite certain about one thing that has been suggested here. It has absolutely nothing to do with old/new, complex/simple, harmonic/rhythmic, loud/quiet, fast/slow preferences. I do acknowledge to have personal preferences, mainly for old, complex, rhythmic, and yes please loud and fast music. It still doesn't explain the resent.

Perhaps it's some strange case of incidental learning? I once had a professor of learning psychology, who was disgusted by apples, because in his childhood he once had become sick after eating too many of them and then riding a rollercoaster.Maybe its some strange form of conditioned response. When I was about eight years old I was in my Uncle Johnnies Pear tree, eating in a peach when I was stung in the belly by a bee. I have never liked peaches since. THe funny thing is that I don't have a problem with bees. I get stung occasionally and it is never pleasant. One day I was at the Academy of Natural Science, They have a bee habitat built into the wall of the kids floor. ~ 50,000 bees behind glass, open to the outside. They change the bee colonies out now and again to maintain the health of the bees. They invited me to help and I did. Moved 100,000 aggravated bees that day, No problem.

Let us consider that whipping boy of the musical world: Rap. I know a lot of people, who are tolerant of many kinds of music just can't abide Rap. Me I don't care for much of it; but there is lots of good Rap out there that I do enjoy. Why is it that we are so selective in our dislikes. It is a strange form of conditioned response.

"The Rum Tum Tugger is a Curious Cat".

Jon Moody
11-06-2014, 04:40 AM
I like to listen to lots of music, but can't help resenting some. I think that 's what defines the 'snobbery' here: resenting or looking down on some music, rather than having a narrow range of musical taste. I can enjoy country, r 'n b, gammelan, highlife, hungarian folk, French punk and quite heavy metal. But there is some particular kinds of music I can't stand at all, and I don't really know why. The Doors always wind me up and get turned off by me. Celine Dione, the poor lass, also doesn't stand a chance on our radio.

I don't think that's musical snobbery. I look at musical snobbery as not liking a specific genre without giving it a fair chance. You've listened to the Doors and decided that they aren't for you, which is fine. That's a preference based on actual listening experience. I'm the same way with Led Zeppelin and Pink Floyd; both of which have been because they played the same couple of "hit" songs on the classic rock radio station I used to listen to, and I got burned out by them. They're excellent groups, but not for me.

Musical snobbery would be me saying "Pfft, Pink Floyd sucks with their trippy crap music" and never have really listened to them. Much like saying a lot of rock/pop music doesn't hold up to jazz.

RichM
11-06-2014, 04:47 AM
Taste in music can change so much over time. I remember back in the early 80's being dragged to a Frank Zappa show by one of my college buddies. I was bored to tears as Zappa played mostly instrumentals and very few songs I'd ever heard before. I discovered that very show, nearly in its entirety, on YouTube recently. I watched it and it was freakin' brilliant. Amazing how much better Zappa got, despite being dead, over the 30 or so years in between.... :)

20thFret
11-06-2014, 07:43 AM
Frank Zappa is a very good example for this thread....he filled his "blank empty space" with notes from every genre...from Country and Western, Pop, Rock, Blues, Rap (before it was invented) all the way to Jazz and Classical - (and even things like percussion experiments similar to Edgard Varese's Ionization)...some of these compositions are quite simple - some incredibly complex - all technically excellent and (in my opinion) all highly enjoyable.

Jim Yates
11-06-2014, 10:57 AM
While I don't consider myself a musical snob, there are genres that I enjoy listening to and playing more than others.

The way a melody is harmonised can depend on the person playing the song. When I was learning to play guitar circa 1960, I had just learned a song called Jack O' Diamonds from a Burl Ives songbook. It suited me at the time, because I could play it with two of the three chords that I knew.

(G) Jack O' Diamonds, Jack O' Diamonds,
I've known you of (D7) old, Boys, I've known you of (G) old.
You robbed my pockets, robbed my pockets
Of silver and (D7) gold, Boys, of silver and (G) gold.

One day I went to a coffee house in Hamilton, Ontario to see a fellow named Jackie Washington. He played my song, but he used two chords for every measure. I ran down to Waddington's School Of Music the next day and bought Mickey Baker's yellow and black jazz guitar book and Jackie Washington became my guitar hero.

Jack O' (G) Diamonds, (GMa7) (G6) (GMa7) Jack O' (G) Diamonds, (Am7)(A#m7)(Bm7)
I've known (Bbm7) you of (Am7) old, (Am6) Boys, (Am7) I've (D13b5) known you of (G) old (Bm7)(Bbm7)(Am7)

James Taylor took a simple folk song, Oh Suzannah, and played a simple Travis style 3 chord instrumental version, but when he started singing, he made some more complex chord substitutions. I'm not sure if these are his, but they're a close approximation:

I (A) come from (Bm7) Ala(C#m7)bama (F#m7) with a (A) banjo (F#m7) on my (Bm7) knee (E7)
I'm (A) goin' to (Bm7) Louisi(C#m7)ana (F#m7) My (C#m7) true (Cm7) love (Bm7) for (Bb) to (A)(Ab)(A)
(D) Oh Su(Bm7)zannah(E7) (A) Don't you (F#m7) cry for (Bm7) me (E7)
I (A) come from (Bm7) Ala(C#m7)bama (F#m7) with a (C#m7) ban(Cm7)jo (Bm7) on (Bb)my (A) knee.

You can "jazz up" almost any simple song by substituting more complex chords. Whether it's wise to do it or if it improves or even ruins the song is a matter of taste. I like to keep some songs simple, but sometimes it's fun to make them a little more "swingy".

I recall playing Hey, Good Lookin' using chord substitutions and giving it a Western swing feel and when I'd finished, a Hank lovin' friend, Lance, said, "Jim, of all the tunes to F#$% up with a bunch of jazz chords, why a Hank Williams tune?"

itsme
11-06-2014, 02:40 PM
Dare I say it? I don't like jazz. I'm okay with a piece like "Take Five" or "Misty" that has a recognizable melody, but that rambling, noodling stuff is just like nails on a chalkboard to me. I also don't care for rap/hip-hop, EDM or most of what passes for "pop" these days. Does that make me a music snob?

mikelz777
11-06-2014, 03:00 PM
Dare I say it? I don't like jazz.

Most people don't so you're in the majority. I love jazz and I've met very few people in my face to face life that listen to it. I'm incredibly impressed with the improvisational nature of jazz and the skill of the musician that can successfully pull it off. I went to see a headliner tenor sax player at the Dakota one night and had a table about 6 feet from the stage. He wasn't traveling with a band so he played with a pick up trio. They hadn't played together before the night of the performance. What killed me is that the headliner could just turn to the trio and say that that he wanted something in 4/4 with a bossa nova feel in the key of __ and they would just take off and start playing and would sound great together with each member soloing along the way. Each member had to listen to what the others were playing and had to play accordingly. I guess that's the art of it, what you're hearing is being created in the moment, it's not thought out in advance and rehearsed. (Though that would not hold true of all jazz of course.) I think it's brilliant and I dig it.

VegasGeorge
11-06-2014, 03:13 PM
Ah yes, the "jazz" question. It's tormented me my whole musical life. I guess the bottom line is, I have to hear something that interests or inspires me in music. Otherwise, I discount it as rubbish. Some jazz improvisation I've heard seems to be OK. It has recognizable elements of melody and harmony that correspond to what I think the music is supposed to sound like. And I say, "Oh, that's nice!" But all too often, the player just seems to go off on a rampage of runs and arpeggiated chords that don't seem to have any beginning or end, and no relationship to the piece of music being played. That leaves me cold. Now, maybe it's me. Maybe the melody and harmony elements are hidden so cleverly in there that I just can't hear them. But, I don't think so. I think the player is just regurgitating a string of jazz licks that happen to be in the right key. And as far as I'm concerned, that's not music. So, am I a snob? If so, so be it.

Peterjens
11-06-2014, 03:16 PM
I don't listen to much jazz but Kinda Blue by Miles Davis is on my "Desert Island" list.

SteveZ
11-06-2014, 03:28 PM
..... You can "jazz up" almost any simple song by substituting more complex chords. Whether it's wise to do it or if it improves or even ruins the song is a matter of taste. I like to keep some songs simple, but sometimes it's fun to make them a little more "swingy"......

Amen to that! Have been guilty of that and also the reverse - finding a really "busy" version of a tune and simplifying it so I can pick it up quickly.

mikelz777
11-06-2014, 04:22 PM
I don't listen to much jazz but Kinda Blue by Miles Davis is on my "Desert Island" list.

Kind Of Blue was/is a brilliant album, lightning captured in a bottle. Bill Evans' liner notes were perfect in capturing what it was all about:

"There is a Japanese visual art in which the artist is forced to be spontaneous. He must paint on a thin stretched parchment with a special brush and black water paint in such a way that an unnatural or interrupted stroke will destroy the line or break through the parchment. Erasures or changes are impossible. These artists must practice a particular discipline, that of allowing the idea to express itself in communication with their hands in such a direct way that deliberation cannot interfere.

The resulting pictures lack the complex composition and textures of ordinary painting, but it is said that those who see well find something captured that escapes explanation.

This conviction that direct deed is the most meaningful reflections, I believe, has prompted the evolution of the extremely severe and unique disciplines of the jazz or improvising musician.

Group improvisation is a further challenge. Aside from the weighty technical problem of collective coherent thinking, there is the very human, even social need for sympathy from all members to bend for the common result. This most difficult problem, I think, is beautifully met and solved on this recording.

As the painter needs his framework of parchment, the improvising musical group needs its framework in time,. Miles Davis presents here frameworks which are exquisite in their simplicity and yet contain all that is necessary to stimulate performance with sure reference to the primary conception.

Miles conceived these settings only hours before the recording dates and arrived with sketches which indicated to the group what was to be played. Therefore, you will hear something close to pure spontaneity in these performances. The group had never played these pieces prior to the recordings and I think without exception the first complete performance of each was a "take."

strumsilly
11-07-2014, 06:50 AM
Also playing jazz tunes on my Kamaka Bari, low g, with Southcoast LL-NW's really helps.I think this was the really important line perhaps ??:biglaugh:
Ha, I just strung my Favilla bari with those this morning and have been practicing my Christmas songs [some of which are Jazzy]. I love them strings!

ps. I agree with this quote from the duke "There are two kinds of music. Good music, and the other kind."

mikelz777
11-07-2014, 06:59 AM
ps. I agree with this quote from the duke "There are two kinds of music. Good music, and the other kind."

But that raises the question, who decides what the good music is and what's the other kind? :confused:

janeray1940
11-07-2014, 07:28 AM
But that raises the question, who decides what the good music is and what's the other kind? :confused:

That's the beauty of it! We all get to decide for ourselves what we consider good :)

SteveZ
11-07-2014, 08:15 AM
But that raises the question, who decides what the good music is and what's the other kind? :confused:

Very easy! According to my grandkids, the "other kind" is what I like, and for the most part vice versa.....

VegasGeorge
11-07-2014, 02:19 PM
Very easy! According to my grandkids, the "other kind" is what I like, and for the most part vice versa.....

Oh jeez! That is one of the most painful aspects of growing older. First, losing touch with whats new and popular. Then realizing that my "good" music is all just old fuddy-duddy stuff to my grandkids. I cling to the past as the world goes whizzing by.

wickedwahine11
11-07-2014, 02:30 PM
I guess for me it becomes snobbish when you say something isn't good just because you don't like it. I don't like chocolate ice cream, camping in the wilderness, or weather much over 85 degrees. I am sure there are people out there that hate cookie dough ice cream, tropical vacations, and weather under 70 degrees. It just means we like different things...and that includes musical tastes.

If you like heavy metal, or country, or jazz or rap, great. If you don't that is fine too - but it doesn't make them bad. It just means you don't like them. When you move into calling them "bad," then yeah, I do think that makes you a snob. Not that there is anything wrong with that...just own it.

This is not really directed to the OP - just in regards to musical snobbishness in general.

RiotNrrd
11-07-2014, 03:22 PM
For me, on the Jazz question:

I love some of it. Some of it I just like, and don't mind listening to, although I might not go out of my way to find it. I dislike a fairly decent proportion of it. And then there's the teeth-clenching stuff I hate. I'm bored by an awful lot of it (generally, the stuff I dislike or hate, which is across the genre probably numerically the majority because Sturgeon's Law).

That tends to happen to me a lot. In different proportions, that's basically my take on rock, pop, rap, classical, orchestral, symphonic, folk, bluegrass, electronic, solo piano, accompanied piano, avante garde, and I could probably keep going but you get the idea.

Actually, that's true for me with desserts, too. And shirts.

Tootler
11-08-2014, 01:57 AM
I guess for me it becomes snobbish when you say something isn't good just because you don't like it.


That's pretty much it as far as I'm concerned though I'd go further and say that snobs not only consider all music but their own favoured style as bad but also look down on all other styles as being inferior. They also tend to have a very narrow outlook and are not even prepared to try listening to other styles but often put them down unheard.

Just having preferences is not snobbery; it's just a matter of personal taste and we're all different.

SteveZ
11-08-2014, 02:28 AM
That's pretty much it as far as I'm concerned though I'd go further and say that snobs not only consider all music but their own favoured style as bad but also look down on all other styles as being inferior. They also tend to have a very narrow outlook and are not even prepared to try listening to other styles but often put them down unheard.

Just having preferences is not snobbery; it's just a matter of personal taste and we're all different.

True. Another observation is that tastes, especially in music, often change over time. However, I must admit that it's tough for me to listen to "gangsta rap" and think any of it being considered a couple decades from now as "golden oldies;" or envision in the future a senior citizen couple celebrating an anniversary, hearing "Straight Outta Compton"
and saying ,"They're playing our song..."

sam13
11-08-2014, 01:08 PM
My favourite Oxymoron:

Country Music.

:agree:

VegasGeorge
11-08-2014, 03:05 PM
My favourite Oxymoron:

Country Music.

:agree:

Snob Alert! Snob Alert! Man your anti-snob battle stations!

Ukejenny
11-09-2014, 12:32 PM
I'm not a musical snob, but I know what I like. And I will try my best not to judge you based on the genres of music you do or do not like. Having said that, it sure is hard to play rap on a ukulele, or I bet it is hard. I've never tried it. And whoever said country music is an oxymoron needs to remember that country and blues have had a tremendous affect on the other genres of music to follow. Bluegrass, Blues, Country - the early roots. We wouldn't have the Beatles, Elvis and so many others without those roots. You may not appreciate the sound of the Carter family, but Mother Carter created a technique of guitar playing that still reverberates through artists performing today. You may think WC Handy is too simple, but his work is still making a difference today.

JJFN
11-09-2014, 12:50 PM
Rap on a ukulele, that would really take talent. I do enjoy rap in small doses, but I'd love to hear it on an ukulele.