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Preacher
11-15-2014, 02:36 PM
I am enjoying my new concert Fluke tremendously and have been taking it everywhere with me. I figured it would quench my UAS for a while but then I stumbled across this:

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/bugsgear-plastic-concert-size-ukulele?gclid=CInjnvHb3cECFYxDMgodRUMAxA

It looks quite interesting and I know there were some reviews of the soprano version on here. I love that it's fairly cheap and also sturdy. I'm very close to putting in the $80 for one.

But what in the world am I thinking?!? I just got the Fluke a few days ago! Am I that greedy? Gluttonous? I feel guilty. (But I can't stop!!! And I'm trying to justify it by saying that I won't see it for another couple months anyway, so....)

(Sorry if I shouldn't have put the link in. I believe the owner is a member here, so I thought it would be all right. I'm not advertising for it at all.)

Is there any help for me? Counseling? Getting a second job to support the addiction?

Chopped Liver
11-15-2014, 02:52 PM
Well, it is supposed to be indestructible so if your other ukes fail, you'll still have this one.
You could play it in the shower.
You could keep this one in the car.
Christmas is coming so why not get yourself a little gift?

Yeah, I'm no help at all . . .

Ukejenny
11-15-2014, 03:08 PM
OF COURSE UAS is completely greed. But that in no way means you shouldn't consider this. Heck, I'm considering it now...

wayfarer75
11-15-2014, 03:20 PM
Greed? Yes. But UAS is fun, isn't it?

Ukulele Eddie
11-15-2014, 03:25 PM
UAS isn't greed, it's indulgent lust!!!

dsummers
11-15-2014, 03:26 PM
It's greed if the required essentials of life is ignored otherwise it is a fun kind of sickness.

Inksplosive AL
11-15-2014, 03:35 PM
Maybe buy more solid wood ukuleles to justify a room humidifier.

I think I'm hovering around 10 ukuleles at this point (why count) my pocket uke came on Monday and I PMed a member tonight about an old banjo ukulele in the marketplace. All soprano players should have one no? ;)

Overall UAS is an easy addiction to support unlike other destructive addictions or addictions to larger items like say MBS with motorcycles. Wanna buy a bike?

~peace~

katysax
11-15-2014, 03:47 PM
If you aren't hurting anyone why assign a judgment to it?

Rick Turner
11-15-2014, 04:03 PM
Free thyself of that left-over Puritan guilt! Know thee that how many thou needest is one more!

Teek
11-15-2014, 05:14 PM
Free thyself of that left-over Puritan guilt! Know thee that how many thou needest is one more!

Amen, brah! :cool:

vanflynn
11-15-2014, 05:27 PM
Greed? Nay Preacher.

Lust, envy, pride maybe. Nothing wrong with simple enjoyment! Have fun.

Peterjens
11-15-2014, 06:11 PM
You are asking us?
There are two type of people on this forum - 'uke addicts and enablers.
In time you will become one or the other or both.

IamNoMan
11-15-2014, 06:20 PM
Preacher, I'm going to take you at your word here, no funnies. I think this UAS stuff has some sort of endorphin tie-in. If indeed its chemical there isn't much hope for us. You mention greed and gluttony. Maybe you should add envy and lust to the list. Four out of seven! I think you should drop the guilt schtick. I don't see any benefit to it. Consider the nine fruits of the tree. You have a problem with self control but otherwise I'd say 8/9 to the good.

You have a problem. You also have two congregations you minister to. Why not take it to them? I can see an excellent sermon here. Galatians, tie into Solomon and David - (We are talking about joyous noise ehh!). Galatians is about the old and new ways anyway. Your parishioners will doubtless benefit from the Sermon. They may have some helpful advice. Of course Christmas is coming up. They may find another solution. And you can always ask them to pray for you. - Another good sermon idea: prayer.

Anyway, think about it.

sonomajazz
11-15-2014, 06:27 PM
Free thyself of that left-over Puritan guilt! Know thee that how many thou needest is one more!

Well put, rev Turner...!

Rick Turner
11-15-2014, 06:33 PM
"On the first night of Christmas,
My true love gave to me
A ukulele in a koa tree..."

See, you get through that song, and you've got twelve ukes! Twelve gates to the city, halleluja! Rev. Gary Davis would have approved.

It's right there in the New Uke Testament! Acacia and all that. Acacia being what the Ark of the Covenant was made out of... Sacred wood = Joyful noise. And all that!

Captain Simian
11-15-2014, 06:50 PM
Are the bills getting paid? Food on the table and roof over your head? Are you kid or kids lacking any basic comforts? If your wife gets sick can you pay for a bottle of Nyquil? Setting something aside for a rainy day? If you can answer yes to all of these then I see no issue in anyone pursuing their passions. Quite frankly, everyone needs to do on thing that's theirs, whether it's ukes, stamps, memorabilia, cooking, whatever, everyone needs that. As long as your family isn't suffering or lacking why should you feel guilty over a harmless yet fun hobby? It's better than collecting ex-wives like one of my bosses (I found out divorce #3 is about to begin in January) or baby mamas like a kid we hired over the summer (just got word this week to garnish his paychecks for child support for his 2nd kid; he's only 20).

Captain Simian
11-15-2014, 06:53 PM
One last thing: The wife has been annoyed with me lately for all the gear lust I've been having. Yesterday she gets home and sees me sitting on the couch re-watching last week's Walking Dead and strumming my Gretsch soprano. She said it reminded her that if the worst thing I do is buy ukes and get into heated debates with our neighbor's kid about Walking Dead, she can live with that.

uke4ia
11-15-2014, 06:56 PM
One solution to UAS is having family members who will give you a ton of crap about "You want to buy ANOTHER uke?"

ksiegel
11-15-2014, 07:14 PM
Not greed, and in this case, not anything to be ashamed about, either. (said the guy with 15 ukuleles...)

Philip makes nice instruments. I was one of the reviewers for the original aqualele soprano, and - while there are several visible problems with the instrument - it is a solid instrument that performs well. I have left mine in the car all summer long, and the only issues I have are tuning. I'm not really happy with the strings, and I think the heat affects them far more than it affects the body. (I haven't completed the review - I'm leaving the uke in for the cold weather, too, and then I can make a much better review.)

I will say that the instrument sounds better to an observer than it does to the player, but the feel of the instrument is solid.

At a festival this past summer, Stu Fuchs played mine for a little bit, and said that he liked it.

Now, as I've said, Phil makes good instruments - so I've joined the party at the $80 level. I'm thinking about raising my contribution to get the photos on the soundboard.

So, go for it!

Inksplosive AL
11-15-2014, 07:50 PM
I'm thinking of buying my sisters family each an inexpensive ukulele for the upcoming family days. They really just have nothing to do struggling like many others and I would like to try to open them up to music. I guess I'm an enabler!

I'm in a toss up right now over either the aqualele soprano or ukedelics but that's a thought for its own thread.

~peace~

Tootler
11-15-2014, 08:55 PM
If n is the current number of ukuleles you possess, then the optimum number can be found from

n -> n + 1

Rule 2. Money spent on a musical instrument is never wasted :music:

g'est
11-15-2014, 08:58 PM
Well, something that helped me restrict buying ukes was establishing a X number rule. So I can only have X ukuleles at the time so if I want to get a new one I must give something up.

This really helps me to figure out whether I REALLY want that new uke! :D I sometimes do, but in most cases I don't.

Tootler
11-15-2014, 09:00 PM
Well, something that helped me restrict buying ukes was establishing a X number rule. So I can only have X ukuleles at the time so if I want to get a new one I must give something up.

This really helps me to figure out whether I REALLY want that new uke! :D I sometimes do, but in most cases I don't.

Spoilsport :)

g'est
11-15-2014, 09:46 PM
Spoilsport :)

Guilty as charged :D

While I do agree with Tootler that money spent on a musical instrument is never wasted, I also feel like every ukulele deserves to be played. It's meant to be played. So I try to have only as many ukes as I can play.

Still, I made sure not so specify the X for anybody else but me. So my advice is: if you feel that you have room for one more, then get it! ;)

itsme
11-15-2014, 09:58 PM
I got to play a BugsGear that someone brought to a uke meet today, not the same model as linked.

It played okay, but it's a plastic uke. Don't expect a lot in the sound department.

IMO, your Fluke will blow it away, so calm down and uke on. :)

bnolsen
11-16-2014, 04:55 AM
or think of it this way. a police officer pulls you over in a speed trap to ticket you that's about the cost of a decent ukulele. 2 tickets and its a good midrange ukulele. who would you rather get the money, the dept of revenue or someone with a ukulele?

Freeda
11-16-2014, 05:24 AM
Make a joyful noise unto the Lord!


God loves ukulele, IMO.

Rllink
11-16-2014, 05:40 AM
or think of it this way. a police officer pulls you over in a speed trap to ticket you that's about the cost of a decent ukulele. 2 tickets and its a good midrange ukulele. who would you rather get the money, the dept of revenue or someone with a ukulele?That is some sound thinking there. Owning a lot of ukuleles keeps you from speeding, or does it help you get away with it? I'm trying to figure that out. I love reading the UAS threads and how everyone justifies buying something, which I don't understand in itself. Keep them coming.

IamNoMan
11-16-2014, 05:57 AM
Don't uke and drive.... at the same time.

bnolsen
11-16-2014, 06:00 AM
Don't uke and drive.... at the same time.

uking and driving is actually very easy. long straight stretches with steady traffic are good for uke-ing.

Rllink
11-16-2014, 06:29 AM
uking and driving is actually very easy. long straight stretches with steady traffic are good for uke-ing.That is where a non-uking spouse comes in handy.

Olarte
11-16-2014, 06:36 AM
As others mentioned, if you are not tapping into your food/mortgage, living expenses etc. What's the harm, or how is it greed?

After having dealt with diabetes and Prostate Cancer, surgery and the after effects of this @&$:&/ disease any last traces of guilt have long dissapearance from my mind.

I support a family of 4 have a healthy 401k for retirement and save less than 5% for my own personal amusement.

Others have a boat, play golf etc... I collect AND play ukulele, classical guitar and violin, and do a lot of digital photography. And every instrument or piece of technology that I have bought has been carefully chosen for the quality, price and degree of enjoyment that I get out of it.

I was lucky enough to stop Cancer in it's tracks, and even luckier to realize how fragile and short life can be. So despite all my responsibilities I have I also make sure I save some of my resources to enjoy every day, every moment that I have left, be it one day or 20 years...

I'm 53 and have worked steadily for the last 40 years and have another 12-15 years left before retirement. I cannot afford to wait until retirement to enjoy the simple pleasures in life... And ukes are some of the simplest yet most satisfying instruments I've come across.

Some people think the background in my videos is a Uke shop, but no, it's part of my beautiful and prized collection which I'm quite happy with and proud to own.

Last of all this is NOT a justification for UAS, but simply an explenation how I choose to view and live my life with my eyes wide open. Having come from a musical family, I have always had a lot of respect for any Instrument that I aquired. They are all much more than simple possessions, they are items made by artists/craftsmen so I and others could express ourselves through music.

IamNoMan
11-16-2014, 06:38 AM
The only instrument I play while driving is the acapella.

DownUpDave
11-16-2014, 06:48 AM
As others mentioned, if you are not tapping into your food/mortgage, living expenses etc. What's the harm, or how is it greed?

After having dealt with diabetes and Prostate Cancer, surgery and the after effects of this @&$:&/ disease any last traces of guilt have long dissapearance from my mind.

I support a family of 4 have a healthy 401k for retirement and save less than 5% for my own personal amusement.

Others have a boat, play golf etc... I collect AND play ukulele, classical guitar and violin, and do a lot of digital photography. And every instrument or piece of technology that I have bought has been carefully chosen for the quality, price and degree of enjoyment that I get out of it.

I was lucky enough to stop Cancer in it's tracks, and even luckier to realize how fragile and short life can be. So despite all my responsibilities I have I also make sure I save some of my resources to enjoy every day, every moment that I have left, be it one day or 20 years...

I'm 53 and have worked steadily for the last 40 years and have another 12-15 years left before retirement. I cannot afford to wait until retirement to enjoy the simple pleasures in life... And ukes are some of the simplest yet most satisfying instruments I've come across.

Some people think the background in my videos is a Uke shop, but no, it's part of my beautiful and prized collection which I'm quite happy with and proud to own.


I had not jumped in on this thread yet until I read the above.

This is probably the finest answer every penned to the question........should I buy another uke.I have nothing more to add other than thank you Olarte.

bnolsen
11-16-2014, 09:13 AM
what about the folks who buy ukuleles as an investment?

myrnaukelele
11-16-2014, 10:20 AM
You are asking us?
There are two type of people on this forum - 'uke addicts and enablers.
In time you will become one or the other or both.

Lol! Uke addict here! In fact I just went to that link and supported this project. A fun new plastic uke will be coming in January. :cool:

katysax
11-16-2014, 11:11 AM
Olarte has a good point. I used to be very tight and watch every penny, limiting very strictly what I bought for personal enjoyment. Then - this was almost 30 years ago - got hit by a car and came within a fraction of a millimeter of being a quadriplegic. I spent three months in the hospital, had to learn to walk again, and had several surgeries. Thankfully except for a few scars I am now fully recovered and 100% functional. It taught me something though; it made real that your life can change drastically or you can die within a fraction of a second.

Some people might have reacted to that experience by becoming more cautious. The effect on me was the opposite; I became a risk taker. It also made me realize that self-denial can be taken too far. We all have to consider our health, our families, save for a rainy day and so forth but we also need to live in the here and now. The worst thing that happens if you buy too many ukuleles is you decide to sell some and you are out a few dollars.

Chopped Liver
11-16-2014, 11:12 AM
"On the first night of Christmas,
My true love gave to me
A ukulele in a koa tree..."

See, you get through that song, and you've got twelve ukes! Twelve gates to the city, halleluja! Rev. Gary Davis would have approved.

It's right there in the New Uke Testament! Acacia and all that. Acacia being what the Ark of the Covenant was made out of... Sacred wood = Joyful noise. And all that!

:agree: You're right! Acacia wood! I need one of those!!! In fact, all of us Rev. should have one! It's Biblical! :D

Fred Ukestone
11-16-2014, 12:25 PM
Here's some food for thought on the possible cause of UAS in some people. http://sophia.smith.edu/~rfrost/nature.poster.html

The Nature Of Compulsive Buying And Acquisition

Marta Murray-Close & Randy Frost, Smith College


Paper presented at the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Advancement of Behavior Therapy, Miami Beach, FL.


Introduction

Compulsive buying has been defined as buying behavior that is *uncontrollable* and *significantly distressing, time consuming, or resulting in social or financial difficulties* (McElroy et al., 1994, p.242). It has been estimated to occur in approximately 1.1% to 5.9% of the population (Faber & O'Guinn, 1992; Faber & O'Guinn, 1989) and can lead to severe disruption in the lives of those affected. Although compulsive buying is the subject of a substantial body of literature, it has been conceptualized almost exclusively as an impulse control disorder.

McElroy et al. (1991,1994) have suggested that compulsive buying is part of a compulsive-impulsive spectrum. In three case studies, they found compulsive buyers to suffer from recurrent and intrusive urges to buy which were accompanied by mounting anxiety. Buying, which occurred in response to these urges, was seen as an attempt to neutralize the anxiety and discomfort experienced by the shopper. This pattern closely resembles the sequence of thoughts and behaviors associated with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), wherein a behavior, or compulsion, is performed in order to neutralize the discomfort associated with an intrusive thought, or obsession. In view of this similarity, and based on anecdotal evidence, Frost and Hartl (1996) have suggested that compulsive buying is closely associated with the OCD hoarding. In fact, they suggest that hoarding be defined, in part, by the tendency to acquire possessions in a compulsive way. The present study was designed to examine the relationship between compulsive buying and compulsive hoarding.

Hypotheses

Compulsive buying will correlate with compulsive hoarding.

Compulsive buying will correlate with Padua Inventory subscales.

Compulsive buying will correlate with other phenomena closely related to compulsive hoarding including perfectionism and indecisiveness.

Compulsive buying will be related to other OCD-related phenomena such as superstitiousness.

Methods

One hundred and sixty nine female undergraduates completed the Compulsive Buying Scale, the Hoarding Scale (Frost & Gross, 1993), the Padua Inventory (Sanavio, 1988), the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (Frost et al., 1990), the Indecisiveness Scale (Frost & Shows, 1993), and the Lucky Beliefs Questionnaire (Frost et al., 1993).

The Compulsive Buying Scale (CBS) contained 13 items derived from previous research and theoretical models of compulsive buying. Subjects were asked to rate how true each item was for them on a scale ranging from 1 (not at all) to 7 (very much). For a list of CBS items, see Figure 1.

The Hoarding Scale is a 24-item version of the 1993 measure. It has been shown to have adequate reliability and validity (Frost and Gross, 1993).

The Padua Inventory is a general measure of OCD symptomatology and contains four subscales: Checking, Mental Activity Control, Motor Behavior Control and Contamination (Sanavio, 1988). It is a reliable scale and has been shown to have adequate validity.

The Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (MPS; Frost et al. (1990) contains 35 items and six subscales, including Parental Criticism, Doubting of Actions, Concern over Mistakes, Parental Expectations Organization and Personal Standards. It has been found to have adequate reliability and validity.

The Decision Making Questionnaire (DMQ) contains 15 items and was used to measure indecisiveness. It has been shown to have adequate reliability and validity (Frost and Shows, 1993).

The Lucky Beliefs Questionnaire (LBQ) contains 30 items designed to assess superstitiousness and has been found to have adequate reliability (Frost et al., 1993)

Results

Properties of the Compulsive Buying Scale

The CBS had adequate reliability (alpha = .87). Scores ranged from 14 to 71 with a mean of 39.7 and a standard deviation of 13.1.

Relationship of Compulsive Buying with Compulsive Hoarding and OCD Symptomatology

As hypothesized, the Compulsive Buying Scale was strongly correlated with scores on the Hoarding Scale. See Table 1. Compulsive buying was also correlated with the Padun total and with all four subscales (Mental Activity Control, Contamination, Checking and Motor Behavior Control). It is interesting to note that the correlation between control over mental activity and compulsive buying was significantly larger than the other correlations involving the Padua.

Relationship of Compulsive Buying with Perfectionism, Indecisiveness and Superstitiousness

As shown in Table 2, compulsive buying was correlated with five of six subscales Parental Criticism,

Doubt, Parental Expectations, Personal Standards and Concern over Mistakes) and total score on the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale. In addition, significant correlations were found between the Compulsive Buying Scale the Decision Making Questionnaire as well as the Lucky Beliefs Questionnaire.

Discussion

The present study found compulsive buying to be highly correlated with compulsive hoarding in a non-clinical sample. Furthermore, compulsive buying was correlated with other characteristics associated with compulsive hoarding such as perfectionism and indecisiveness. These findings suggest a strong relationship between the hoarding and compulsive buying and argue for the inclusion of compulsive buying as a more central component in the model of compulsive hoarding. As proposed by Frost and Hartl (1996), it seems likely that hoarding is characterized not only by the inability to discard, but also by the tendency to acquire things in a compulsive way.

Compulsive buying was also found to be correlated with OCD symptomatology and with the OCD-related phenomena of superstitiousness. These correlations provide empirical evidence in support of the proposed relationship between compulsive buying and OCD. Of particular interest is the larger correlation between compulsive buying and the Mental Activity Control subscale of the Padua Inventory. The correlation of compulsive buying with Mental Activity Control was significantly higher than the other subscales. This suggests that a lack of control over mental processes is central to the way in which compulsive buying is experienced.

Given the apparent importance of mental activity in the way that compulsive buying is experienced, it is useful to consider the kinds of mental processes that might be involved. It may be the case that compulsive buying is one manifestation of an underlying pattern of mental activity and that the tendency to buy compulsively is part of a more general tendency towards compulsive acquisition. This possibility suggests several avenues for further research. Additional forms of compulsive acquisition are of interest, as are the mental processes that underlie them.

References

Faber, R.J. & O'Guinn, T. (1989). Classifying compulsive consumers: Advances in development and diagnostic tool. Advances in Consumer Research, 16, 738-744.

Faber, R. & O'Guinn, T. (1992). A clinical screener for compulsive buying. Journal of Consumer Research, 19, 459-469.

Frost, R. & Hartl, T. (1996). A cognitive behavioral model of compulsive hoarding. Behavior Research and Therapy, 34, 341-350.

McElroy, S., Phillips, K., Keck, P., Jr. (1994). Obsessive compulsive spectrum disorder. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 55, 33-51.

McElroy, S., Keck, P., Pope, H., Smith, J., & Strakowski, S. (1994). Compulsive buying: A report of 20 cases. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 55, 242-248.

Table 1: Compulsive Buying Scale Items

1. How often do you buy things you never use?

2. How often do you buy things you don't have the money for?

3. How often do you pick things up that other people have discarded?

4. How often do you feel compelled to buy something (e.g. a good bargain) even though you don't need the object?

5. How often do you feel anxious or depressed when you don't buy something you really wanted?

6. How often do you buy things to make yourself feel better?

7. How often do you feel like you absolutely have to have something you see while shopping?

8. To what extent do you feel distressed or upset because you have bought things you don't need?

9. To what extent do you spend too much time shopping?

10. Has excessive shopping resulted in financial difficulties for you?

11. Has excessive shopping interfered with your social life or your job?

12. How often do you look through other people's trash (e.g. dumpsters) for things to bring home?

13. How often do you spend a longer time shopping than you intended?

Table 2: Correlations between CBS and the Hoarding Scale, Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale and the Decision Making Scale

Hoarding Scale .51*
Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale .39*
Parental Criticism
.27*
Doubting of Actions
.35*
Parental Expectations
.28*
Personal Standards
.24*
Concern Over Mistakes
.40*
Decision Making Questionnaire .29*

Table 3. Correlations between Compulsive Buying and the Padua Inventory and Superstitiousness Scale

Padua Inventory .30*
Mental Activity Control
.51*
Contamination Fear
.33*
Checking Behavior
.29*
Motor Behavior Control
.30*
Lucky Beliefs Questionnaire .25*
*p < .01

Olarte
11-16-2014, 12:39 PM
Wow Katysax, thanks for sharing your story. Amazing isn't it how a brush with death can really wake you up.

I was collecting way before my illness but going through Cancer and slaying that dragon made me feel much more aware of how little time we have, it made me more selfish in a very healthy way. Which is why I no longer feel any guilt about doing what I want and when I want. I have enough confidence in myself to know that I know my priorities and what comes first.

Aside from that ukes are affordable, they keep their value if taken care of, and so varied that I often enjoy playing the same tune from my smallest sopranino through to my Risa Les paul steel string.

One thing I am seriously thinking about is what to do with the collection once I'm gone. I'm thinking of donating it to Ukes for Kids (a great non-profit that gives ukes to kids in hospitals) with the provision that they use the proceeds of any sale to fund additional ukes for kids. I figure the my two sons and wife will get everything else and would not appreciate the value of such a collection. Which is currently a bit over 3 dozen. ;)

Just to put my collection in perspective, it's been a shitty year, Cancer woke me up in many ways including realizing that only one out of 6 siblings care enough to be in my life. My marriage of 25 years has been more a label than a reality (which I'm still in the process of re-evaluating) and my job in IT is so full of red tape and unsatisfying that I feel downright dirty as I get paid to put up with it rather than to be creative and motivated.

And so the only 3 things that bring me true happiness on a daily basis are my morning 5 mile walk with my 13 yr old dog skip. Having skip by my side as a constant and loving companion, and looking up at my wall of ukes and playing often, as long as I'm free of pain. (I've been nursing a throbbing right elbow/arm for the past 3 weeks. Hoping it's not arthritis)

Anyway that is my story and I'm sticking to it.

I have found that music reall does have the power to heal!

This is the last video I recorded back in July 3 days after surgery, so please excuse the poor playing specially how out of sync I was with the Cajon track I recorded. Keep in mind what you don't see is the Catherer that I had on and had to keep for the next two weeks. All you see is the walking stick I was using for support and to hang the bag on...
It's been a while but, I have plans to record some songs in Spanish... Real soon.


http://youtu.be/Ve0ENx8UdIA

Teek
11-16-2014, 01:01 PM
I read all of the above and I have watched a number of episodes of hoarding shows. pretty much all of those people have been psychologically damaged for life by abusive parental upbringing. Every item on the hoarding scale correlates with abusive dysfunctional upbringing; perfectionistic, unpleasable, shaming & blaming parents. There is usually substance abuse somewhere in the generational background. It can cause all of thses behaviors and more:

Parental Criticism
.27*
Doubting of Actions
.35*
Parental Expectations
.28*
Personal Standards
.24*
Concern Over Mistakes

So yes, finding something that most of us equate with joy is a way of self medicating; more joy making devices = more joy. If we add in appreciation of the artistic qualities of instruments then there is satisfaction of acquiring functional art (raises hand) that is aesthetically pleasing in addition to bringing joy through playing. There is also a satisfaction in goal setting and achieving those goals. I for example come from a family where one entire side is or were musicians, and my grandfather was a famous bandleader. But they were all such narcissistic dysfuntional abusers/abused that no one ever thought of asking me if I wanted to play an instrument or offered lessons. I was tossed aside by my family and was salvaged by another grandparent, that one person asked "Would you like to play piano?" because she did and could teach me, and I tried but I was only 12 and couldn't really get into it.

I did want to play guitar but there was no money, and I finally got one at around 17 that I bought from a neighbor, but there was nothing available to me to learn but a chord book and trying to teach myself musical notation. There were no tab books. Plus it was a steel string and hurt to play. I didn't try again until my mid to late 20s when I was given a small body student classical guitar and I sat and watched Frederic Noad every Saturday morning on PBS.

Now I am making up for lost time!

However I have also bought AND SOLD a few dozen ukes and have found the ones that fit the best so am moving a lot more out. I think that is also part of the impulse to buy, thinking that this one will sound better or that one will make me a better player. My only other hobbies are riding my 13 year old mountain bike or my motorcycle, and messing around with art. I used to have a lot more interests, I had horses for 30 years, I roasted my own coffee, I was a computer nerd, I sold antiques, I collected native Americana and other tribal art, I was a sculptor and painter; now I am just too tired. Also less is more.

Nickie
11-16-2014, 01:10 PM
Olarte, I think I've said it before, but I'll say it again....congratulations on beating CA. right now I am with a 28 yr old female who is dying of CA. It sucks. The sadness hangs over this house like a black cloud. It's taking it's toll on hte nurses, too. I wish I could play for her, I think it might help.
Fred, thanks for this research article on hoarding and OCD. They are both results of severe control issues, and I can totally relate.
I work every day on compulsivness, control, and other issues like codependency. I think UAS is a cool thing, fun to talk about, I love seeeing people's new ukes....who cares, as long as it doens't hurt anyone?
I watched a guy win 2 ukes at TBUG, the crowd moaned and started to boo, so I started applauding him. Then a whole bunch of people did.
So it was his lucky day and not mine, so what? At least I don't have CA. And I bet his UAS is in remission right about now.
Teek, I just saw your post. My laptop is weird. Yes, less is more. I'm plannng to get work done on two of my ukes, I love customzing things, like I did my Hogs. I really don't need anymore ukes, I can't justify it financially, as long as I am in debt and still working a job. I'm behind on tithing, because I missed church two weeks ina row, but I'll get caught up and pay them interest!
I have no qualms whatever about people having 10, 20, 50, even 100 ukes. I wouldn't have room for more than about 6 at our house anyway.

Fred Ukestone
11-16-2014, 01:14 PM
.....Also less is more.

Never a truer sentence spoken.

Love what you have and not what you crave for.

Olarte
11-16-2014, 01:25 PM
Nickie, I'm so sorry to hear about your friend. That's a tough pill to swallow. One of the reasons why I did not hesitate to get the surgery done which was not an easy decision or experience is because I've been watching my sister in law fight for her life as she is quickly approaching the end with an aggressive form of cancer now on stage 4. I realized how lucky I was to have the chance to battle Cancer early and make a full recovery if I was brave enough to go through with it.

As for ukulele people, the Uke seems to attract a very special kind of beings. People who are happy, friendly and willing to enjoy the simple things in life. I love the story about the double winner, only in our Uke community could one person turn a booing crowd into a cheering one. You certainly had that Aloha spirit!




Olarte, I think I've said it before, but I'll say it again....congratulations on beating CA. right now I am with a 28 yr old female who is dying of CA. It sucks. The sadness hangs over this house like a black cloud. It's taking it's toll on hte nurses, too. I wish I could play for her, I think it might help.
Fred, thanks for this research article on hoarding and OCD. They are both results of severe control issues, and I can totally relate.
I work every day on compulsivness, control, and other issues like codependency. I think UAS is a cool thing, fun to talk about, I love seeeing people's new ukes....who cares, as long as it doens't hurt anyone?
I watched a guy win 2 ukes at TBUG, the crowd moaned and started to boo, so I started applauding him. Then a whole bunch of people did.
So it was his lucky day and not mine, so what? At least I don't have CA. And I bet his UAS is in remission right about now.

Nickie
11-16-2014, 01:46 PM
Thank you Olarte.....actually I am one of her nurses....the only one she wants on weekends....so I'm stuck working whole weekends for a while...but it's some OT....and we've bonded. She's a very sweet kid, gets almost no visitors. Her fiance is burned out on taking care of her....he's pretty "not present". I just want to cry. But I think she does enough of that for both of us. She just lost her appetite....it's a b---- trying to get her pain under control, a constant battle. It's amazing how much of thier pain is emotional....and I'm really sorry tohear about your sister. I'm so glad UU is full of ohana.....and aloha spirit!

Olarte
11-16-2014, 02:44 PM
Nickie I LOVE nurses. God bless you! :bowdown:

Speaking of special people, I think it takes a very special and giving kind of person to be a nurse. Doctors may be there to diagnose, cut, and heal you but nurses are there to care for you and to make you feel safe and secure when you need it the most.

I have nothing but fond memories of nurses that have reassured me before procedures and have been there right after to take care of me and make me feel safe and secure. Not just from the Prostate surgery but as far back as when I had ear surgery at 9.

In hindsight, I would have loved to have been a nurse, I'm serious. And yes I know it's never too late but for me I'm too selfish and thirsty for life to change careers at this point in my life. :old: I rather spend my non-working hours playing Uke and resting than going back to school.

Nickie
11-16-2014, 03:10 PM
Olarte, I totally get it....I don't want any more nursing school either. I love what I do, but I'm ready to retire. Daily telling the Universe to help me get my biz off the ground! Then I can have all the ukes I want! LOL

Chopped Liver
11-16-2014, 03:49 PM
Olarte, I think I've said it before, but I'll say it again....congratulations on beating CA. right now I am with a 28 yr old female who is dying of CA. It sucks. The sadness hangs over this house like a black cloud. It's taking it's toll on hte nurses, too. I wish I could play for her, I think it might help.

Nickie, so sorry to hear this. You both are in my prayers.

Nickie
11-16-2014, 04:08 PM
Nickie, so sorry to hear this. You both are in my prayers.

Thank you so much!

Jim Yates
11-16-2014, 04:54 PM
Olarte - I'm glad that you're getting on with your life so soon after your surgery. Eleven years ago I was diagnosed with prostate cancer as well and, like you, I decided that I wanted to get the cancer out of me ASAP and opted for surgery. I have been cancer free for eleven years now, but in that time I have lost my youngest brother, my sister-in-law and my good friend and musical partner to cancer. It is a terrible disease and we must do all we can to eradicate it. I will be playing at a benefit concert for the brother of a friend who is fighting an aggressive cancer on the weekend.
I enjoyed your playing very much.

Jim Yates
11-16-2014, 05:04 PM
The only instrument I play while driving is the acapella.

About five or six years back, I played a weekend gig in Wilno, a couple of hours away from my home. A law had been recently passed requiring oly the use of "hands free devices" while driving I Ontario. It was late at night and a long boring drive, so I decided to practise my harmonica usig the neck rack. While I was sure that this would qualify as a "hands free device" I was later advised by a friend who was a police officer that I should avoid doing this in the future.
It reminded me of Bryan Bowers, the Autoharp virtuoso, who put suicide knobs at 5 o'clock and 7 o'clock on the steering wheel of his truck so that he could pracise the Autoharp while steering with his knees...definitely not a hands free device.



Thread drift - Spell check tells me that there is no such word as "practise". It has always been my understanding that "practise" is a verb and "practice" is a noun. For example - "We are going to have a choir practice to practise the new song."

Preacher
11-16-2014, 06:45 PM
Well, this thread went in a much "deeper" direction than I had expected when I originally posted it. I meant for it to be bit more light-hearted than it turned out. But, the way it's gone has taught me--no, REMINDED me, because it's evident on here so often--that this UU Community is really made up of an amazing bunch of people. And it's also reminded me of how powerful music is, and how easily accessible the ukulele makes music.

I do find it odd that I'm quick to consider getting another uke when I've just gotten a new one. And it must be a uke thing, because I don't do that with other items in my life. I DO need to keep a watch on the wallet--having 6 kids all under the age of 17 makes for an expensive shopping list most weeks. So I'm trying to sell my Ohana Tenor to pay for the Fluke I just got. Haven't decided yet on the plastic concert.

But having read all the comments on here, I'm inclined to take more risks, enjoy more music, live more fully, and experience all the joy I can.

Thanks guys.

Coconut Willie
11-17-2014, 04:49 AM
Ahhhh....you have been infected!!! lol
The only cure, and it takes a while, is to BUY....BUY....BUY!!!!

bnolsen
11-17-2014, 04:58 AM
I do find it odd that I'm quick to consider getting another uke when I've just gotten a new one. And it must be a uke thing, because I don't do that with other items in my life. I DO need to keep a watch on the wallet--having 6 kids all under the age of 17 makes for an expensive shopping list most weeks. So I'm trying to sell my Ohana Tenor to pay for the Fluke I just got. Haven't decided yet on the plastic concert.

it looks like you have a mainland gecko. That should be everything you need for portability. You can get a plastic but IMHO they don't ever sound as good as a laminate top.

It's great to have a fluke in your arsenal but it seems more like a good ukulele to have in your arsenal. I'm not sure I'd be happy with just a fluke by itself even though it's really a great ukulele. Perhaps it's the unique sound and large size...

Preacher
11-17-2014, 07:08 AM
The Mainland Gecko does not have proper intonation. If I play through the scale starting with the C string, the next note is flat. I don't know enough about how to fix that (I'll put that question in the Luthier's Lounge threads) so I don't really play it at all. The tuners don't hold tuning much at all either. Again, this is all stuff I need to figure out how to fix. The Fluke is the only (and first) concert size uke I have and I'm loving it! That's why I'm looking at the plastic concert.

(And I'm not complaining about the Gecko--it was a gift, so I'm grateful for it. It just doesn't work quite right yet.)

Fleapluckin_Flapper
11-17-2014, 08:32 AM
I would never classify collecting ukes as "greed". Why are you punishing yourself for doing something you obviously enjoy? You're helping the American economy by buying these ukuleles,helping the makers of them keep their jobs,playing the uke to spread happiness and joy. You'll be able to pass on these instruments to the next generation by leaving them in your will. I still have my grandmothers banjo uke. Had she thought of herself as "greedy" I wouldn't have this heirloom in my hands now. Go get that uke.

Tootler
11-17-2014, 09:53 AM
The trouble with UAS is the secondary infections that come with it, commonly known as Gear Acquisition Syndrome (GAS).

You have that nice uke so you think you'll make a video for You Tube so you can show it off and. The built in mic on your laptop is pretty crap so you need a better one.... Then you need a better recording device as the built in input on the laptop is pretty naff and there's loads of hiss.... Well you've got a dynamic mic, wouldn't a condenser mic be better? .... Oh the small diaphragm condenser mic's OKish but a large diaphragm one would be even better and..... Don't forget a better amp for that electric uke you have...... and you have to have some effects pedals to go with it...............





Remember: Anything guitars can do we can do better :music: :cheers: