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CTurner
12-11-2014, 06:44 AM
I just replaced the two batteries in my Kala U-Bass. It was only because I found out I couldn't get the tuner to light up that I realized it was time.

My question is: should I disconnect my Ubass from the audio interface box when not playing? That is, how do the little batteries get drained?

Phuufme
12-11-2014, 07:46 AM
In my experience most instruments with active pickups (i.e. a battery) discharge power when the cable is plugged in. On my wife's Kala U-Bass we only leave it plugged in when we set up for a gig until the gig is over and of course, when we practice. We try to remember to unplug if it is not being played.

katysax
12-11-2014, 09:44 AM
Yep. Unplug when not using. Plugged drains the battery.

martinfan
04-04-2016, 06:25 AM
Yep. Unplug when not using. Plugged drains the battery.

I just learned this...by default.

Where do most get their batteries? Amazon?

kohanmike
04-04-2016, 07:13 AM
I just learned this...by default. Where do most get their batteries? Amazon?

Hardware store 5 minutes from me; 9v, AA, AAA, 2032. Some people suggest NOT to use lithium because they don't gradually die to warn you that they need changing like alkaline do, lithium die almost instantly.

Booli
04-04-2016, 09:15 AM
Hardware store 5 minutes from me; 9v, AA, AAA, 2032. Some people suggest NOT to use lithium because they don't gradually die to warn you that they need changing like alkaline do, lithium die almost instantly.

I get mine from either Amazon or B&H, both with free shipping.

Lithium battery chemistry (CR2032, CR2025, CR2016) is different enough from alkaline batteries such that if you discharge them too far, they can actually leak or explode, and as such they usually have a minimal protection circuit that provides a 'hard cutoff', whereas alkaline and NiCd and NiMh batteries will allow for a pretty much tapered voltage drop before they simply become unusable from having too little energy stored.

(sorry if this next part is off topic, but it is SAFETY related)

Also, Lithium-Ion and Lithium-Polymer batteries are an entirely different chemistry all-together, and have their own special care requirements.

All of the rechargeable batteries ALSO require special care when charging otherwise they can catch fire or explode in a very nasty way if they are charged with too high an amperage or voltage...but I digress - but do yourself a favor and get a better charger for a few sheckels more rather than risk burning your house down if you are using any kind of rechargeable batteries.